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Tower Heist (2011)

PG-13 | | Action, Comedy, Crime | 4 November 2011 (USA)
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ON DISC
When a group of hard-working guys find out they've fallen victim to their wealthy employer's Ponzi scheme, they conspire to rob his high-rise residence.

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(story), (story) | 4 more credits »
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3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Lester (as Stephen McKinley Henderson)
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Miss Iovenko
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Rose
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Manuel
Harry O'Reilly ...
Special Agent Dansk
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Marty Klein Esq.
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Storyline

Josh Kovaks is the manager of a high-rise condominium in New York. He is close to all the tenants, especially financier Arthur Shaw. One day Shaw is arrested by the FBI for fraud. Josh thinks it's a misunderstanding that can be resolved, but later he learns that the employees' pension fund - which he asked Shaw to handle - is gone. When one of the employees tries to kill himself, Josh's views of Shaw change. He goes to see him and loses his temper, and his job. The FBI agent in charge tells him that Shaw might walk, and recovering the pension fund is unlikely. She tells him that it's been rumored that Shaw has $20 million lying around if he needs it in a hurry. Josh thinks he knows where it is, so with two other fired employees and an evicted tenant, they set out to get into Shaw's penthouse to get the money. But they realize they need the assistance of someone who knows how to steal, so Josh asks an old acquaintance named Slide who he knows is a thief to help them. Written by rcs0411@yahoo.com

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

It's not just a robbery. It's payback. See more »

Genres:

Action | Comedy | Crime

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for language and sexual content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

4 November 2011 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Trump Heist  »

Box Office

Budget:

$75,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

AED 1,802,057 (United Arab Emirates) (6 November 2011)

Gross:

$78,046,570 (USA)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Stephen Henderson (Lester) is talking to Ben Stiller (Kovaks) about how he got drunk and pretended to be Mufasa from The Lion King (1994). Matthew Broderick (Mr. Fitzhugh) did the voice for adult Simba in the Disney version of The Lion King (1994). See more »

Goofs

When referencing The Lion King, Lester says "Mustafa" when the character's name is "Mufasa." However, the mispronunciation could have been deliberate as Lester was referencing a drunken moment Josh has had in the past, and directly quoting him during Josh's drunken state. See more »

Quotes

[from trailer]
Odessa Montero: You mess with me, you're a dead man!
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Connections

References Matlock (1986) See more »

Soundtracks

Charge the Field
Written by Jeremy Sweet, Sean Vega and Amjad Albasel
Courtesy of FirstCom Music
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

Cookie-Cutter Action-Comedy
4 November 2011 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Everyone's excited for the new Brett Ratner movie, right? Jonesing for another marginal action-comedy in the vein of Rush Hour 2? You're in luck! Tower Heist fits the bill, and despite its allusions to 2011 Wall Street turmoil, the familiar flick feels very much of that era. The Rat-man's latest is cookie-cutter entertainment at its most transient, but everyone likes cookies. Right?

In Tower Heist, Ben Stiller plays subservient chief of staff at a ritzy Central Park apartment complex — but when a tenant (Alan Alda) swindles him and his workforce out of their pensions, it's no more Mr. Nice Josh. He masterminds a robbery with the help of his concierge (Casey Affleck), an elevator operator (Michael Peña), a downtrodden former resident (Matthew Broderick), and a Jamaican cleaning woman (Gabourey Sidibe). Unschooled as they are in the art of the steal, Josh also employs the aid of petty criminal "Slide," (Eddie Murphy) who gives the crew a crash course in crime.

The cast of Tower Heist, anchored by Stiller, Alda, and the under-appreciated 'other' Affleck, is its greatest asset. Gabourey Sidibe pulls a Melissa McCarthy in a similar big girl supporting role, and as for Eddie Murphy — it's good to know that there's still a funny guy beneath the Norbit prosthetics. Granted, nobody's working with AAA material here, but their comic chemistry makes for some laugh out loud moments.

Conceived and written by Ted Griffin of Ocean's Eleven and Matchstick Men, Tower Heist strictly adheres to caper convention. Assemble the team, unfurl the plan, set said plan into motion, and wait for it all to come undone. It's a tried and true formula, which is ironic considering the risk its characters incur. There's even a heavy-handed chess metaphor about sacrificing one's Queen, but Griffin is a decidedly defensive player.

Then there's the Rat-factor. Poor Brett's an easy guy to hate. Called "Hollywood's Ad Impresario" by Businessweek, he's the dude who wants to make a Guitar Hero movie. He's a purely commercial filmmaker who's helmed competent but inferior follow-ups to beloved franchises like X-Men and Silence of the Lambs. And let's face it, he's kind of ugly. With Tower Heist, the director isn't flexing any artistic muscles, but he's got the mechanics down pat.

Plus, he's got the good sense to hire performers who probably don't need much direction. Guys like Stiller, Murphy, and Broderick are so well practiced that they're entertaining even when they're resting on their laurels. Similarly, Ratner's worked with cinematographer Dante Spinotti enough times to not have to concern himself with the visual aspects of filmmaking. Though the credits suggest otherwise, Ratner's role is nearer to producer than director.

Consequently, Tower Heist feels impersonal and even a bit disingenuous. After all, what could Brett Ratner, the privileged son of a Miami socialite turned blockbuster director, have in common with the working stiffs he portrays? It's easy to hate Ratner, but unfair to channel that negative energy at his work. With a good cast and decent material, Tower Heist is an amusing, inconsequential diversion that entertains and evaporates in the span of 100 minutes. And with a family friendly PG-13 rating, this cookie-cutter action-comedy is poised to make loads of dough.


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