6.1/10
29,589
331 user 212 critic

Bug (2006)

An unhinged war veteran holes up with a lonely woman in a spooky Oklahoma motel room. The line between reality and delusion is blurred as they discover a bug infestation.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (play)

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ON DISC
1 win & 6 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Neil Bergeron ...
Man in Grocery Store
Bob Neill ...
Pizza Harris (voice)
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Storyline

Having escaped her abusive ex-husband Goss, recently released from state prison, Agnes, a lonely waitress with a tragic past moves into a sleazy, rundown motel. Her lesbian co-worker R.C. introduces her to Peter, a peculiar, paranoiac drifter and they begin a tentative romance. However, things aren't always as they appear and Agnes is about to experience a claustrophobic nightmare reality as the bugs begin to arrive... Written by alfiehitchie

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Paranoia is contagious. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Horror | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some strong violence, sexuality, nudity, language and drug use | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

25 May 2007 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Bogárűző  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$4,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$4,015,846, 27 May 2007, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$7,006,708, 17 June 2007
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to Lynn Collins, director William Friedkin never took more than four takes to get a scene in this film, and in fact worked so fast that the actors sometimes had to beg him to do a second take when he thought they'd nailed it the first time. See more »

Goofs

For almost the whole movie the front door of the motel opens to the outside, but in the last few scenes (room wrapped in tin foil) the front door opens to the inside. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
[phone rings]
Agnes White: Hello? Hello?
[hangs up]
Agnes White: Bastard!
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Crazy Credits

There is a short scene after the first part of the credits, a telephone rings during the credits, and a brief shot after the credits end. See more »

Connections

References The Exorcist (1973) See more »

Soundtracks

Viva Mi Sinaloa
(2004)
Written by Luis Enrique Lopez
Performed by Los Tigres del Norte
Courtesy of Fonovisa Records
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User Reviews

 
Effectively disturbing psychological thriller
25 May 2007 | by See all my reviews

Bizarre, stylish thriller is one of the best big screen tales of creeping paranoia in many years.

Depressed Oklahoma woman living in a rural motel meets a mysterious drifter who claims the army has planted deadly insects in his body as part of a shady experiment. But that's only the beginning...

While the trailer for Bug may make it seem like a David Croenberg-type parasite horror film, Bug is really much more of a dark psychological character study. Never the less this is a compelling and truly twisted little shocker. The plot starts off leisurely, but ultimately builds to some intense and hauntingly good sequences. The characters are convincingly well played, the atmosphere is brooding, and the direction is slickly done.

Ashley Judd is terrific as the lonely woman who becomes infatuated with the stranger and Michael Shannon does a strong performance as the ex-soldier who fears he is part of a sinister conspiracy. Harry Conick Jr. is also great in his supporting role as Judd's abusive ex-con husband.

While Bug may disappoint gore-hounds, those that enjoy a good mind-trip will find much to savor in this warped little film!

*** 1/2 out of ****


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