The story of Danny, a small boy who goes to the mall with his big sister. While she is hanging out with her friends, he runs away. The viewers see the world through a child's eyes.

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Cast

Credited cast:
Jamie Olson ...
Cindy
...
John Doe
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Tara / Girl
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Storyline

Return is the story of Danny, a little kid who goes to the shopping mall with his big sister. While she is hanging out with her friends, she loses sight of Danny. He wanders off, and the viewers are now free to see the world through a child's eyes. After crossing the freeway and L.A. River, Danny wanders into an old mausoleum, where a dark stranger stands over a grave, watching him suspiciously. The stranger, JOHN DOE engages the child in an existential conversation which leads the two disenfranchised figures to find a common bond, before John help Damny find his way back to his family at the shopping mall. Written by Cameron Pearson

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

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A conversation about death. See more »

Genres:

Short | Drama

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1 January 1996 (USA)  »

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Quotes

Danny: Where are we?
John: The gateway to oblivion; the final destination of our meaninglessnes. who fucking knows... What's your name?
Danny: Danny
John: Pleased to meet you, Danny. My name's John.
Danny: Who are you?
John: I'm one the Catcher in the Rye didn't catch. Chalk. Soap. Cream Corn.
Danny: What?
John: Don't get me started or I'll start quoting Keats.
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User Reviews

 
Looking with a child's eyes
23 September 2007 | by (Canada) – See all my reviews

A unique student film from writer/director Cameron Pearson that deals with existence and death, but from the point of view of a small child, who, interestingly enough, engages in this conversation with a ghost.

Taking a child's point of view always brings a special kind of perspective to any topic as a child's views are pure and uncorrupted. It is often the best way to look at life; to force yourself to see things with a fresh pair of eyes and challenges you to re-think your views, which I firmly believe is the mark of a good movie. If a movie doesn't make you think, then it's simply mindless entertainment. But a movie that makes you walk away deep in thought is a gift.


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