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2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

1-20 of 45 items from 2006   « Prev | Next »


Dubai fest hands out first Muhr awards

18 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates -- The third Dubai International Film Festival ended Sunday with a ceremony for the inaugural Muhr awards.

Oliver Stone, on hand to receive the DIFF Salute for his contribution to cinema and present a screening of his World Trade Center, gave away the prizes to young Arab filmmakers. "It is hard to make films in the Middle East, but cinema can help bridge those divisions (within society)," Stone said. "This is a good attempt to reach out."

Actors Richard Gere, Robin Tunney, Adriana Barraza, Terrence Howard and Mos Def, Arab film personalities and Dubai royalty also were in attendance. The entertainment highlight was Jumana -- a multimedia play projected onto towering sand dunes and water screens.

Algerian feature "Barakat!" (dir: Djamila Sahraoui) took the festival's $50,000 first prize, while Lebanese film Falafel (dir: Michel Kammoun) earned silver and Moroccan entry "Why? O'Sea" (dir: Hakim Belabbes) took third place.

Said DIFF chairman Abdulhamid Juma: "Although a film festival's job is to showcase and not fund films -- as it causes a conflict of interest -- we are supporting regional cinema because there is no state financing available." »

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N.Y. critics hail 'United 93,' 'Queen'

14 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

NEW YORK -- In what chairman Marshall Fine described as "a dogfight" between United 93 and The Queen, Paul Greengrass' Sept. 11 drama was named best film Monday by the New York Film Critics Circle after a four-round tiebreaking vote.

Stephen Frears' Queen earned the most awards, including best actress for Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II and best screenplay for Peter Morgan. Forest Whitaker took home best actor honors for his portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland.

" 'United 93' was really a dark horse," Fine said. "A lot of people avoided seeing it because of the subject matter. It was one of the most harrowing films of the year."

The chairman added that its runoff with Queen was the first he had experienced in his 17 years with the organization. He said that this year's other big Sept. 11 drama, World Trade Center, wasn't a factor in the voting.

Martin Scorsese was named best director for The Departed, the film that ran third among the critics' favorites. Amy Berg's Deliver Us From Evil won nonfiction film, George Miller's Happy Feet won animated film and Ryan Fleck's Half Nelson won best first feature.

In one of the most surprising votes, Jean-Pierre Melville's French World War II drama Army of Shadows won foreign-language film; it was made in 1969 but wasn't released domestically until this year. Pedro Almodovar's Volver and Cristi Puiu's Romanian drama The Death of Mr. Lazarescu were the runners-up.

Newcomer Jennifer Hudson took home the supporting actress award for her much-discussed screen debut in Bill Condon's Dreamgirls, and former child star Jackie Earle Haley (The Bad News Bears) won supporting actor for his portrayal of a sex offender in Todd Field's Little Children. Guillermo Navarro won the cinematography award for Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth.

Larry Charles' Borat won no awards but had a strong second runner-up showing for both Sacha Baron Cohen as best actor (after Ryan Gosling in Half Nelson) and nonfiction film (after Michael Apted's 49 Up). The latter award is notable because the film, despite its reliance in improvisation and the unknowing participation of nonactors, has four credited writers. »

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'United 93,' Whitaker, Mirren, Scorsese get N.Y. critics' nod

12 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

NEW YORK -- In what chairman Marshall Fine described as "a dogfight" between United 93 and The Queen, Paul Greengrass' Sept. 11 drama was named best film Monday by the New York Film Critics Circle after a four-round tiebreaking vote.

Stephen Frears' Queen earned the most awards, including best actress for Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II and best screenplay for Peter Morgan. Forest Whitaker took home best actor honors for his portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland.

" 'United 93' was really a dark horse," Fine said. "A lot of people avoided seeing it because of the subject matter. It was one of the most harrowing films of the year."

The chairman added that its runoff with Queen was the first he had experienced in his 17 years with the organization. He said that this year's other big Sept. 11 drama, World Trade Center, wasn't a factor in the voting.

Martin Scorsese was named best director for The Departed, the film that ran third among the critics' favorites. Amy Berg's Deliver Us From Evil won nonfiction film, George Miller's Happy Feet won animated film and Ryan Fleck's Half Nelson won best first feature.

In one of the most surprising votes, Jean-Pierre Melville's French World War II drama Army of Shadows won foreign-language film; it was made in 1969 but wasn't released domestically until this year. Pedro Almodovar's Volver and Cristi Puiu's Romanian drama The Death of Mr. Lazarescu were the runners-up.

Newcomer Jennifer Hudson took home the supporting actress award for her much-discussed screen debut in Bill Condon's Dreamgirls, and former child star Jackie Earle Haley (The Bad News Bears) won supporting actor for his portrayal of a sex offender in Todd Field's Little Children. Guillermo Navarro won the cinematography award for Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth.

Larry Charles' Borat won no awards but had a strong second runner-up showing for both Sacha Baron Cohen as best actor (after Ryan Gosling in Half Nelson) and nonfiction film (after Michael Apted's 49 Up). The latter award is notable because the film, despite its reliance in improvisation and the unknowing participation of nonactors, has four credited writers. »

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N.Y. critics hail 'United 93,' 'Queen'

12 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

NEW YORK -- In what chairman Marshall Fine described as "a dogfight" between United 93 and The Queen, Paul Greengrass' Sept. 11 drama was named best film Monday by the New York Film Critics Circle after a four-round tiebreaking vote.

Stephen Frears' Queen earned the most awards, including best actress for Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II and best screenplay for Peter Morgan. Forest Whitaker took home best actor honors for his portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland.

" 'United 93' was really a dark horse," Fine said. "A lot of people avoided seeing it because of the subject matter. It was one of the most harrowing films of the year."

The chairman added that its runoff with Queen was the first he had experienced in his 17 years with the organization. He said that this year's other big Sept. 11 drama, World Trade Center, wasn't a factor in the voting.

Martin Scorsese was named best director for The Departed, the film that ran third among the critics' favorites. Amy Berg's Deliver Us From Evil won nonfiction film, George Miller's Happy Feet won animated film and Ryan Fleck's Half Nelson won best first feature.

In one of the most surprising votes, Jean-Pierre Melville's French World War II drama Army of Shadows won foreign-language film; it was made in 1969 but wasn't released domestically until this year. Pedro Almodovar's Volver and Cristi Puiu's Romanian drama The Death of Mr. Lazarescu were the runners-up.

Newcomer Jennifer Hudson took home the supporting actress award for her much-discussed screen debut in Bill Condon's Dreamgirls, and former child star Jackie Earle Haley (The Bad News Bears) won supporting actor for his portrayal of a sex offender in Todd Field's Little Children. Guillermo Navarro won the cinematography award for Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrinth.

Larry Charles' Borat won no awards but had a strong second runner-up showing for both Sacha Baron Cohen as best actor (after Ryan Gosling in Half Nelson) and nonfiction film (after Michael Apted's 49 Up). The latter award is notable because the film, despite its reliance in improvisation and the unknowing participation of nonactors, has four credited writers. »

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'United 93,' Whitaker, Mirren, Scorsese get N.Y. critics' nod

11 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

NEW YORK -- In what chairman Marshall Fine described as "a dogfight" between United 93 and another fact-based feature, The Queen, Paul Greengrass' 9/11 drama was named best film at the New York Film Critics Circle awards after a four-round tiebreaking vote.

Stephen Frears' Queen earned the most awards--two--including best actress for Helen Mirren as Queen Elizabeth II and best screenplay for Peter Morgan. Forest Whitaker took home best actor honors for his portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King of Scotland.

"'United 93' was really a dark horse," said Fine. "A lot of people avoided seeing it because of the subject matter. It was one of the most harrowing films of the year." The chairman said its best film tie runoff with Queen was the first he'd experienced in his 17 years with the organization. He said this year's other big 9/11 drama, World Trade Center, wasn't really a factor in the voting.

Martin Scorsese was named best director for The Departed, the film Fine said ran third among the critics' favorites. Amy Berg's Deliver Us From Evil won best nonfiction film, George Miller's Happy Feet won best animated film and Ryan Fleck's Half Nelson won best first feature.

In one of the most surprising votes, Jean-Pierre Melville's French World War II drama Army of Shadows won best foreign language film. Shadows was made in 1969 but never released domestically until this year. Cristi Puiu's Romanian drama The Death of Mr. Lazarescu also had a lot of support, according to Fine.

Newcomer Jennifer Hudson took home the best supporting actress award for her much-discussed screen debut in Bill Condon's Dreamgirls, and former child star Jackie Earle Haley (The Bad News Bears) won best supporting actor for his portrayal of a pedophile in Todd Field's Little Children.

Guillermo Navarro won the best cinematography award for Guillermo Del Toro's Pan's Labyrynth, which was also a top contender for best film and other awards, according to Fine. »

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Bello, Sher, Gyllenhaal rise, shine

27 November 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

World Trade Center stars Maria Bello and Maggie Gyllenhaal and producer Stacey Sher will be the keynote speakers Dec. 5 at The Hollywood Reporter's Women in Entertainment breakfast at the Beverly Hills Hotel.

The annual breakfast event is held in conjunction with the publication of The Reporter's Women in Entertainment Power 100 special issue, now in its 15th year.

"We are delighted to have such a talented trio keynote this year's breakfast," said John Kilcullen, publisher of The Reporter. "They each have noteworthy achievements in their respective fields and represent the essence of the success that Women in Entertainment is designed to celebrate."

Bello and Gyllenhaal earned accolades from critics this year for their performances as the wives of two NYPD officers trapped in the rubble of the World Trade Center's twin towers on Sept. 11, 2001. An Oscar-nominated producer, Sher served as producer on WTC, directed by Oliver Stone.

As part of the event, two-time Academy Award winner Meryl Streep will receive the 2006 Sherry Lansing Leadership Award. »

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Etheridge, Stone score on panels

15 November 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The subtleties of dealing musically with the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks and the threat of global warming were addressed by director Oliver Stone and musician Melissa Etheridge, respectively, during panel discussions Tuesday at The Hollywood Reporter/Billboard Film & TV Music Conference.

Discussing his feature World Trade Center on a panel at the Beverly Hilton with his composer, Craig Armstrong, and music supervisor, Budd Carr, Stone said that Armstrong was not his first choice to score the picture. "John Williams turned us down", the Oscar-winning writer-director said. "I listened to dozens and dozens of composers."

However, Armstrong -- best known for his work with Baz Luhrmann on Romeo + Juliet and Moulin Rouge! -- ultimately impressed Stone with his delicate approach. "It was very, very subtle music", Stone recalled. "The very first piano theme was right on."

Surprisingly, though shooting was well under way when the Scottish composer joined the project, Armstrong wrote his key theme on the basis of the script.

"It's very helpful to write away from picture, to get the emotional truth," Armstrong said.

The sensitive nature of the subject matter in "WTC" -- the struggle to rescue two New York policemen trapped in the rubble of the towers, and the impact of the search on their families -- was addressed by the filmmakers. »

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Etheridge, Stone score on F&TVM panels

14 November 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The subtleties of dealing musically with the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks and the threat of global warming were addressed by director Oliver Stone and musician Melissa Etheridge, respectively, during panel discussions Tuesday at The Hollywood Reporter/Billboard Film & TV Music Conference.

Discussing his feature World Trade Center on a panel at the Beverly Hilton with his composer, Craig Armstrong, and music supervisor, Budd Carr, Stone said that Armstrong was not his first choice to score the picture. "John Williams turned us down", the Oscar-winning writer-director said. "I listened to dozens and dozens of composers."

However, Armstrong -- best known for his work with Baz Luhrmann on Romeo + Juliet and Moulin Rouge! -- ultimately impressed Stone with his delicate approach. "It was very, very subtle music", Stone recalled. "The very first piano theme was right on."

Surprisingly, though shooting was well under way when the Scottish composer joined the project, Armstrong wrote his key theme on the basis of the script.

"It's very helpful to write away from picture, to get the emotional truth," Armstrong said.

The sensitive nature of the subject matter in "WTC" -- the struggle to rescue two New York policemen trapped in the rubble of the towers, and the impact of the search on their families -- was addressed by the filmmakers. »

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Stone Shooting Olympic Promo

6 November 2006 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Oscar-winning director Oliver Stone is lending his movie expertise to 2008 Olympics host China to shoot a five-minute promo encouraging "cultural exchange". The World Trade Center filmmaker will film the project in capital city Beijing. In a statement organizers said it would form a "promotional video for cultural exchange between Beijing and the world." It will be shown on TV, in cinemas and on flights in China and abroad in the run-up to the sporting extravaganza. Stone says of the task, "Today, many peoples of the world can live in harmony, and China plays an important role. China and the United States are two big countries that should have more interaction. My goal in shooting this Olympic short film also lies in this - the need to build a harmonious international society." Other international directors lined up to promote China through short movies are Italian Giuseppe Tornatore and Iranian Majid Majidi. »

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Cineplex enjoys record Q3 revenue

3 November 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

TORONTO -- Canadian exhibition giant Cineplex Entertainment LP on Thursday posted improved earnings on record third-quarter revenues after acquiring the rival Famous Players Ltd. chain from Viacom a year ago.

Toronto-based Cineplex Entertainment, which operates 132 theaters nationwide, posted third-quarter earnings of CAN$9.3 million ($8.2 million) for the three months to Sept. 30, up 63% from earnings of CAN$6.1 million in 2005.

Cineplex Entertainment CEO Ellis Jacob attributed the record third-quarter revenue -- CAN$199 million, compared with a year-earlier $151.9 million -- to the strong boxoffice from Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest, Talladega Nights, Superman Returns and World Trade Center.

Revenues at Cineplex Entertainment also were up after the exhibitor acquired 77 locations with 768 screens from Famous Players last year. Cineplex Entertainment subsequently agreed to sell off 35 Famous Players theaters to secure regulatory approval for the deal.

Cineplex Entertainment is 59% owned and controlled by the Cineplex Galaxy Income Fund, with the rest controlled by Canadian holding company the Onex Corp.

»

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Chinese gov't pushes patriotic films

31 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

BEIJING -- Chinese authorities declared October as Golden Autumn Excellent Domestic Film Exhibition Month in a government-led campaign to promote the premieres of patriotic films.

All month long, theaters across China have been urged to favor titles such as My Long March, a paean to Mao Zedong, founder of the People's Republic.

The campaign delayed the premiere of Oliver Stone's World Trade Center and Michael Mann's Miami Vice until November.

Film executives said that the campaign is in keeping with a speech made by President Hu Jintao last December to mark the centenary of Chinese cinema. Hu, who has overseen a general crackdown on media freedoms here this year, called for film workers "to stick to the correct political direction at all times."

Executives and China scholars say that Beijing's intervention in the film business is discouraging to young filmmakers in an industry struggling to gain a footing in the increasingly global marketplace.

»

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Chinese gov't pushes patriotic films

31 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

BEIJING -- Chinese authorities declared October as Golden Autumn Excellent Domestic Film Exhibition Month in a government-led campaign to promote the premieres of patriotic films.

All month long, theaters across China have been urged to favor titles such as My Long March, a paean to Mao Zedong, founder of the People's Republic.

The campaign delayed the premiere of Oliver Stone's World Trade Center and Michael Mann's Miami Vice until November.

Film executives said that the campaign is in keeping with a speech made by President Hu Jintao last December to mark the centenary of Chinese cinema. Hu, who has overseen a general crackdown on media freedoms here this year, called for film workers "to stick to the correct political direction at all times."

Executives and China scholars say that Beijing's intervention in the film business is discouraging to young filmmakers in an industry struggling to gain a footing in the increasingly global marketplace.

»

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'World Trade Center' Wins First Film Honor of the Season

25 October 2006 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Oliver Stone's gripping 9/11 drama World Trade Center was named Best Film in the first major awards show of the 2006/2007 season, beating out Pirates Of The Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest at the Hollywood Awards on Monday night. The night's big award was voted for by online film fans. The other big winner at last night's honors was Robin Williams, who claimed the Hollywood Career Achievement Award and poked fun at his recent rehab stint. The recovering alcoholic told the star-studded Beverly Hilton audience, "It's fun to come out of rehab and come somewhere with an open bar." Meanwhile, Forest Whitaker earned the Hollywood Actor of The Year Award for his portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in The Last King Of Scotland, while Penelope Cruz's turn in Volver earned her the Hollywood Actress of the Year Award. Ben Affleck claimed the Best Supporting Actor prize for playing TV Superman George Reeves in Hollywoodland. Affleck took time to heap praise on his actress wife Jennifer Garner, who had to leave the event early to take care of the couple's baby daughter, during his acceptance speech. He said, "The woman who is babysitting my daughter tonight, she's the reason I was able to be here. She's, in fact, the reason most of the good things have happened to me in my life. She is spectacular." Affleck's Forces Of Nature co-star Sandra Bullock picked up the night's Best Supporting Actress trophy for her portrayal of Harper Lee in new film Infamous. Lindsay Lohan and Derek Luke were honored with Breakthrough Actor and Actress of the Year Awards, while Lohan's starry movie Bobby was handed the Hollywood Ensemble Acting Award. Oliver Stone also claimed the Director of The Year prize for World Trade Center. »

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Stone To Re-Visit 9/11 Tragedy

17 October 2006 | WENN | See recent WENN news »

Oliver Stone is set to direct another movie based on the 9/11 terrorist attacks on America following his recent film World Trade Center. The director's next film, Jawbreaker, will focus on America's response to the terrorist attacks with the invasion of Afghanistan and hunt for 9/11 mastermind Osama Bin Laden. The script will be based in part on a memoir of the same name by Gary Berntsen, the Central Intelligence Agency's point man during the invasion and the man who coordinated the efforts of the CIA and Special Operations Forces to end Taliban rule. Stone secured the rights to the book months ago and kept it a secret so that World Trade Center could open unencumbered in the US and overseas. He says, "We've been discreet because we didn't want World Trade Center to be affected unnecessarily by political bulls**t about Afghanistan." The Platoon director said the intention of Jawbreaker will be to create compelling drama, not spark political controversy. He adds, "I'm not looking to make a political movie, but it always seems to come down to that with me." »

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'Prada,' 'Trade Center' hold top spots in int'l b.o.

16 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Films geared to the over-25 audience continue to do well at this time of year, with such titles as The Devil Wears Prada and World Trade Center leading the overseas boxoffice for a second week in a row. Those entries, along with such newcomers as Martin Scorsese's crime drama The Departed and Sony Pictures Animation's Open Season added to the positive signs of a recovery of the international boxoffice from the doldrums of 2005. Foreign distribution studio executives cite an MPA report that indicates that this year's January-September boxoffice at offshore theaters is ahead of 2005's pace by 12%, $6.4 billion to $5.7 billion, and is equal at this time to 2004's record $6.4 billion for the period. In the U.K. over the weekend, the top three films on the boxoffice chart -- The Departed, Prada and Open Season -- earned more than $3 million each at the boxoffice. »

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'Prada,' 'Trade Center' hold top spots in int'l b.o.

16 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Films geared to the over-25 audience continue to do well at this time of year, with such titles as The Devil Wears Prada and World Trade Center leading the overseas boxoffice for a second week in a row. Those entries, along with such newcomers as Martin Scorsese's crime drama The Departed and Sony Pictures Animation's Open Season added to the positive signs of a recovery of the international boxoffice from the doldrums of 2005. Foreign distribution studio executives cite an MPA report that indicates that this year's January-September boxoffice at offshore theaters is ahead of 2005's pace by 12%, $6.4 billion to $5.7 billion, and is equal at this time to 2004's record $6.4 billion for the period. In the U.K. over the weekend, the top three films on the boxoffice chart -- The Departed, Prada and Open Season -- earned more than $3 million each at the boxoffice. »

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'Prada' wears well at o'seas b.o.

9 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The fall overseas market, usually subdued until the arrival of the year-end blockbusters, provides an opportunity for films that appeal to the over-25 crowd, a status validated as The Devil Wears Prada and World Trade Center finished No. 1 and No. 2 in the weekend boxoffice sweepstakes. Also noticeable at this time of year is the steady arrival of a batch of action, crime, thriller and mystery dramas -- among them The Departed, The Guardian, Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, The Black Dahlia -- all with staggered release patterns and geared to pick up a piece of the boxoffice action before the newest Bond offering, Casino Royale, floods the international market in November. At the same time, local films -- a German documentary about World Cup soccer, for example -- continue to shine in many markets, and territorial distributors have a chance to find dates for independent product. »

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'Prada' wears well at o'seas b.o.

9 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The fall overseas market, usually subdued until the arrival of the year-end blockbusters, provides an opportunity for films that appeal to the over-25 crowd, a status validated as The Devil Wears Prada and World Trade Center finished No. 1 and No. 2 in the weekend boxoffice sweepstakes. Also noticeable at this time of year is the steady arrival of a batch of action, crime, thriller and mystery dramas -- among them The Departed, The Guardian, Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, The Black Dahlia -- all with staggered release patterns and geared to pick up a piece of the boxoffice action before the newest Bond offering, Casino Royale, floods the international market in November. At the same time, local films -- a German documentary about World Cup soccer, for example -- continue to shine in many markets, and territorial distributors have a chance to find dates for independent product. »

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Par, bank team for sequel fund

3 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The Paramount Motion Picture Group, a unit of Viacom, and investment bank Dresdner Kleinwort announced a $300 million film financing arrangement Monday. Called Melrose Investors 2 Llc., it is a follow-up transaction to the 2004 Melrose Investors Llc. fund, which invested $225 million in 25 Paramount films, beginning with the April 2004 release Mean Girls. The new fund will invest in the production costs of at least 30 films bearing the labels of Paramount Pictures, DreamWorks, MTV Films and Nick Movies. Titles from the studio's specialty division Paramount Vantage and the Paramount Classics label are not part of the package. The new fund covers the current Paramount release slate beginning with the romantic comedy Failure to Launch, which was released March 10. It includes the summer's Mission: Impossible III, Nacho Libre and World Trade Center; the current Jackass Number Two; and such upcoming releases as Freedom Writers, Norbit, Shooter and The Spiderwick Chronicles. »

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New entries vie for overseas b.o.

3 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

As the overseas market settles into the autumnal slowdown that precedes the year-end burst of holiday entries, a diverse group of films got a chance to find audiences in scattered markets around the world. At present, the overall international market is doing better than at this time a year ago, but it falls far short of any shouting from the rooftops. A mad scramble for dates in key moviegoing territories saw a close race for weekend boxoffice honors, with World Trade Center coming in first with $12.7 million, followed by Click, $11 million; The Devil Wears Prada, $10.9 million; and Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, $8.5 million. Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest, which dominated the overseas market for 10 of the past 13 weeks, wound down to $4 million, but not before accumulating a mammoth $631.5 million at foreign boxoffices and a total of $1.1 billion when combined with domestic returns. »

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