There Will Be Blood
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

1-20 of 44 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


7 Good Guy Movie Characters Who Could Have Easily Been Bad Guys

17 hours ago | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Ever watch someone in a movie do something that made you think, “did he really just do that?”  Well, it happens a lot, but because said someone is usually the film’s main character and we want them to win, we let stuff like catastrophic destruction or murder – you know, the little things – slide.

With that said, that doesn’t make what they do right, and the following is a list of 8 movie characters whose choices could be interpreted as either a positive or a negative act. Keep in mind, what we’re looking for here are not necessarily all antiheroes, and that in a lot of these cases, we’re not suggesting that we’re ignorant of the emotional circumstances that prompted the protagonist’s actions. We’re simply playing the devil’s advocate.

The kind of characters that will be featured on this list are protagonists that, for the most part, »

- Luke Parker

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Being There,’ ‘Fire at Sea,’ ‘Multiple Maniacs,’ and More

21 March 2017 9:23 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Being There (Hal Ashby)

On paper, there’s an implausibility to the central conceit of Being There that could have resulted in a four-quadrant studio comedy forgotten soon after its release. However, with Hal Ashby’s delicate touch — bringing Jerzy Kosiński and Robert C. Jones‘ adaptation to life — and Peter Sellers‘ innocent deadpan delivery, this 1979 film is a carefully observed look at how those we interact with can offer an introspective mirror into our own lives. “There’s so much left to do, »

- The Film Stage

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The Search for Purpose in the Films of Paul Thomas Anderson

20 March 2017 12:49 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

We are officially in the year of a new Paul Thomas Anderson film — a re-team with his There Will Be Blood star Daniel Day-Lewis, no less — but as it’ll be a bit of time until we actually get to see it, we’re looking elsewhere to help with the wait. Following a 2.5-hour series, a new video essay has now arrived to help satiate our ongoing curiosity with the director’s films. If there is one unifying theme in the seven narrative films of PTA, it’s the search for purpose in life, covered in a variety aspects in a new 22-minute video essay.

“I don’t get a sense of American pride. I just get a sense that everyone is here, battling the same thing – that around the world everybody’s after the same thing, just some minor piece of happiness each day,” the director once said. Indeed, »

- Leonard Pearce

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Elle,’ ‘The Lovers on the Bridge,’ ‘Fences,’ and More

14 March 2017 10:23 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Elle (Paul Verhoeven)

Paul Verhoeven’s latest treatise on high / low art isn’t going to appeal to everyone, and, as this awards season has shown, it’s already deeply offended some. But its messiness and blurred moral provocations are key to its power as a piece of cinematic trickery. A masterful character study, Elle dresses up a pulpy morality play with an austere European arthouse sheen, then sends its powerfully passive lead through a minefield of ethical conundrums, »

- The Film Stage

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Another Film Podcast Episode 7: The Shining / The VVitch

7 March 2017 10:00 AM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Judson & Collin are back and talkin' horror this week! They talk Kubrick's horror masterpiece The Shining & Robert Eggers masterful debut The VVitch; they also talk about American sexual Puritanism, The Birth of a Nation, the moon landing, even work in a mention of There Will Be Blood - fancy that!

Join us now and in the future. You can listen here or on iTunes, and now available on Android/Google Play!Please rate, review, and share our podcast! Be sure to check out and follow the official Twitter for upcoming episodes. @AnotherFilmPod 

 

 

 

 

HORRORFilmCINEMApodcastANOTHER Film PODCASTStanley KubrickROBERT Eggersthe WITCHThe Shining »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Collin Llewellyn)

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Jackie,’ ’45 Years,’ ‘One More Time With Feeling,’ and More

7 March 2017 7:20 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

45 Years (Andrew Haigh)

Andrew Haigh’s third feature as a director, 45 Years, is an excellent companion piece to its 2011 predecessor, Weekend. The latter examined the inception of a potential relationship between two men over the course of a weekend, whereas its successor considers the opposite extreme. Again sticking to a tight timeframe, the film chronicles the six days leading up to a couple’s 45th wedding anniversary. Though highly accomplished, Weekend nevertheless suffered from a tendency towards commenting »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Before’ Trilogy, ‘Moonlight,’ ‘Kate Plays Christine,’ ‘Allied,’ and More

28 February 2017 6:12 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Allied (Robert Zemeckis)

That thing we can’t take for granted: a film whose many parts – period piece, war picture, blood-spattered actioner, deception-fueled espionage thriller, sexy romance, and, at certain turns, comedy – can gracefully move in conjunction and separate from each other, just as its labyrinthine-but-not-quite plot jumps from one setpiece to the next with little trouble in maintaining a consistency of overall pleasure. Another late-career triumph for Robert Zemeckis, and one of the year’s few truly great American movies. »

- The Film Stage

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Oscars: What Should Have Won – There Will Be Blood for Best Picture over No Country for Old Men

24 February 2017 4:30 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Graeme Robertson on why There Will Be Blood should have won Best Picture at the 80th Academy Awards…

The Oscars celebrating the best that 2007 had to offer were something of an oddity, in that nearly every film nominated in the main categories dealt with rather dark and complex themes, with the only light in this cavalcade of darkness being teenage pregnancy comedy Juno. Also, it was odd in that unlike most Oscar line-ups most of the films were actually quite good.

While the Coen brothers triumphed in the major categories winning Best Director and Best Picture for their dark neo-noir western thriller No Country for Old Men, and I while do think it’s an excellent film, I’m going to be a contrarian again for the final time in this series and argue that the top prize should have gone to another film.

In my view, the film that »

- Graeme Robertson

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Manchester by the Sea,’ ‘Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown,’ and More

21 February 2017 7:44 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Fireworks Wednesday (Asghar Farhadi)

After a festival tour back in 2006, Asghar Farhadi’s Fireworks Wednesday was theatrically re-released by the newly established Grasshopper Films, and now it’s arriving on DVD. The drama is another precisely calibrated, culturally specific demonstration of Farhadi’s skills in constructing empathy machines. Further in line with the director’s filmography, this story has a nesting-doll structure that combines ingrained social hierarchies, domestic drama, and a tragic intersection of misunderstandings. And while it »

- The Film Stage

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Arrival,’ ‘The Edge of Seventeen,’ ‘The Tree of Wooden Clogs’ & More

14 February 2017 6:50 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Arrival (Denis Villeneuve)

Within the alien subgenre, there lies another. Therein, knowledge is treasure and the fifth dimension is love. The major rule: once the mystery and the chills have subsided, the revelations are enlightening and the welcomes warm. Thankfully, Denis Villeneuve‘s Arrival is more worthwhile than that. The film juggles a bit of world-building with meaty, compelling characters while trying to make linguistics look cool. No easy task, but the film does so in a breeze »

- The Film Stage

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Oscar-Animated Short Nominees Break With Tradition

9 February 2017 9:30 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

This year’s nominees for animated short run the gamut of emotions, from tragedy to joy. In many cases, they also stretch the bounds of what’s traditionally expected in animation.

Nominee Theodore Ushev, director of “Blind Vaysha,” notes that indie animation typically has thought-provoking, darker, themes, but may have flown under the Acad’s radar in the past. “I see enormous progress in the Academy’s choices,” Ushev says. “It’s evolved in a good direction recently, really recognizing the differences and diversity in the art of animation. Animation is not only for kids, not only for entertainment. I made my film for kids from 9 to 99.”

Fellow nominee, “Borrowed Time” co-director Lou Hamou-Lhadj, echoes Ushev’s view: “We were a bit frustrated with the lack of breadth in stories told through animation in America, and wanted to contribute to the medium by helping illustrate that it isn’t merely a children’s film genre, »

- Terry Flores

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Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Cameraperson,’ ‘Loving,’ ‘The Lobster,’ and More

7 February 2017 1:06 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Cameraperson (Kirsten Johnson)

A travelogue through one artist’s subconscious, Cameraperson is perhaps the most plural film of 2016 – a formal, tonal, situational, and pacing exercise that lulls viewers into thinking it’s set on one thing before turning towards seemingly new territory. And it never feels out-of-balance because director Kirsten Johnson has, by building this film around moments that “marked” her, granted such an intimate experience that it almost feels wrong to intellectualize much of anything that’s going on here, »

- The Film Stage

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Witness the Evolution of Cinematography with Compilation of Oscar Winners

6 February 2017 1:47 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

This past weekend, the American Society of Cinematographers awarded Greig Fraser for his contribution to Lion as last year’s greatest accomplishment in the field. Of course, his achievement was just a small sampling of the fantastic work from directors of photography, but it did give us a stronger hint at what may be the winner on Oscar night. Ahead of the ceremony, we have a new video compilation that honors all the past winners in the category at the Academy Awards

Created by Burger Fiction, it spans the stunning silent landmark Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans all the way up to the end of Emmanuel Lubezki‘s three-peat win for The Revenant. Aside from the advancements in color and aspect ration, it’s a thrill to see some of cinema’s most iconic shots side-by-side. However, the best way to experience the evolution of the craft is by »

- Jordan Raup

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From ‘Manchester By the Sea’ to the Super Bowl: How a Rising Cinematographer Landed a Major Budweiser Ad

6 February 2017 12:53 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

If the Budweiser Super Bowl ad “Born The Hard Way” reminded you of the work of Paul Thomas Anderson, that’s not a coincidence. The 60-second commercial that tells the story of Anheuser-Busch co-founder Adolphus Busch’s emigration from Germany to St. Louis, Missouri was inspired by Anderson’s “The Master” and “There Will Be Blood,” according to director of photography Jody Lee Lipes.

Read More: ‘Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2’ Super Bowl Trailer: Chris Pratt and the Alien Misfits Face Their Biggest Battle Yet

The cinematographer of “Manchester by the Sea” and “Trainwreck,” Lipes and the commercial’s director, Chris Sargent, also drew inspiration from Francis Ford Coppola’s “Apocalypse Now,” Terrence Malick’s “Days of Heaven” and “The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford.” Sargent hired Lipes for the Budweiser ad after the pair worked together on commercials for Asics and Acura.

Set in »

- Graham Winfrey

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‘Beauty and the Beast’: John Legend and Ariana Grande Give the Classic Ballad a Modern-Day Twist – Listen

3 February 2017 9:21 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

John Legend and Ariana Grande have taken the reins singing the Disney classic “Beauty and the Beast” for the upcoming live-action musical. A snippet of the title track first debuted in the final trailer that was unveiled this week and now, the full version has been released.

The iconic ballad is given a modern-day twist by the two award-winning artists, who do an exceptional job at showcasing their powerful vocal abilities. The song is produced by Ron Fair, who described the song as “a new school/old school fresh treatment that shows the soulfulness and power of what a great melody and lyric can inspire.”

Grande and Legend will also shoot a music video for the track, to be directed by Dave Meyers, and released later this month.

Read More: ‘Beauty and the Beast’ Trailer: Emma Watson and Dan Stevens Fall in Love In This Live-Action Tale as Old as »

- Liz Calvario

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A Beautiful Video Compilation of Every Best Cinematography Winner

3 February 2017 7:45 AM, PST | firstshowing.net | See recent FirstShowing.net news »

This is splendid. YouTube channel Burger Fiction has put together a beautiful compilation video of every Best Cinematography winner at the Oscars from 1927 to 2015, when it was award to Emmanuel Lubezki of The Revenant, a back-to-back win after Birdman. For admirers of cinematography, this is a breathtaking and awe-inspiring video. And it just makes me want to watch everything all over again. From Cleopatra, The Thief Of Bagdad, Ben-Hur, Doctor Zhivago, Dance With Wolves, Braveheart, The Aviator, Couching Tiger Hidden Dragon, There Will Be Blood to Inception, there's so many excellent films awarded in this category. Thanks to David Chen fro the tip on this. Originally from YouTube, made by Burger Fiction. For the full list of all the Best Cinematography winners seen in this, visit their Tumblr. The Best Cinematography category has been around since the very beginning. From 1939 to 1967 (with the exception of 1957), there were also separate awards »

- Alex Billington

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Official Information on Paul Thomas Anderson's New Untitled Film

2 February 2017 9:18 AM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

The movie news that the film community has been waiting for: Focus Features sent out an official press release giving us an update on the new unititled Paul Thomas Anderson film, which reunites him with Daniel Day-Lewis after the two collaborated on the 2007 masterpiece There Will Be Blood.

Cameras are rolling on Paul Thomas Anderson's eighth picture in the United Kingdom under the working title Phantom Thread, although the press release addresses it as "Untitled." I think Phantom Thread is a title fitting of Paul Thomas Anderson's oeuvre of masterpieces, but we'll see what they land on in the near future. The film is being distributed by Focus Features and Universal Pictures with an anticipated release date in late 2017.

The meat of the press release as follows:

Continuing their creative collaboration following 2007’s There Will Be Blood, which earned Mr. Day-Lewis the Best Actor Academy Award, Mr. Anderson »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Collin Llewellyn)

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Production underway on Paul Thomas Anderson and Daniel Day-Lewis’ latest film

2 February 2017 5:35 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Focus Features has announced that production is underway on Paul Thomas Anderson’s as-yet-untitled new film, which reteams him with his There Will Be Blood star Daniel Day-Lewis.

The film is a drama set in the couture world of 1950s London, and “illuminates the life behind the curtain of an uncompromising dressmaker commissioned by royalty and high society.”

Day-Lewis will be joined in the cast of the film by Lesley Manville (Another Year) and Vicky Krieps (A Most Wanted Man). »

- Gary Collinson

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Newswire: Jonny Greenwood is doing the score for that new Paul Thomas Anderson movie

1 February 2017 7:25 PM, PST | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Consequence Of Sound reports that Radiohead guitarist Jonny Greenwood has signed on to write the score for Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest film. Greenwood has worked extensively with Anderson; counting this latest, still-untitled project, he’ll have scored the last four of the director’s eight feature films. (Meanwhile, Anderson has returned the favor, filming several music videos for Radiohead.) The two first worked together on 2007’s There Will Be Blood, which starred Daniel Day-Lewis, who’s also starring in this latest film.

»

- William Hughes

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Paul Thomas Anderson Begins Shooting New Movie with Daniel Day-Lewis

1 February 2017 5:30 PM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Production has begun in the U.K. on writer/director Paul Thomas Anderson's untitled new film. Three-time Oscar winner Daniel Day-Lewis is joined in the cast by Lesley Manville, who was a BAFTA Award nominee for Best Actress for Another Year, and Vicky Krieps, whose films include A Most Wanted Man and Focus Features' Hanna. Focus holds worldwide rights to the film, and will distribute the film in the U.S. later this year with Universal Pictures handling international distribution.

The film's producers are JoAnne Sellar, Megan Ellison, through her Annapurna Pictures, and Paul Thomas Anderson. The executive producers are Peter Heslop, Adam Somner, and Daniel Lupi. Chelsea Barnard and Jillian Longnecker are overseeing production for Annapurna. Continuing their creative collaboration following 2007's There Will Be Blood, which earned Mr. Day-Lewis the Best Actor Academy Award, Mr. Anderson will once again explore a distinctive milieu of the 20th century. »

- MovieWeb

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

1-20 of 44 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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