There Will Be Blood
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A Note Regarding Spoilers

The following FAQ entries may contain spoilers. Only the biggest ones (if any) will be covered with spoiler tags. Spoiler tags have been used sparingly in order to make the page more readable.

For detailed information about the amounts and types of (a) sex and nudity, (b) violence and gore, (c) profanity, (d) alcohol, drugs, and smoking, and (e) frightening and intense scenes in this movie, consult the IMDb Parents Guide for this movie. The Parents Guide for There Will Be Blood can be found here.

Yes. There Will Be Blood is loosely based on Oil!, a 1927 novel by American author Upton Sinclair [1878-1968], although producer, director, and screenwriter Paul Thomas Anderson admits that he changed the title because "there's not enough of the book... to feel like it's a proper adaptation."

Because he seems to sense that the people of the community are too savvy, i.e., they cannot be taken advantage of. With all the people talking (and yelling) in the meeting, Daniel picks up on how much sharper they are than his usual prospects.. So, rather than take their offer and knowing they'd want to know every aspect of his business process, he turns them down.

Paul Dano was originally cast as Paul Sunday only, while Kel O'Neill was originally cast as Eli Sunday. When O'Neill left, Dano was recast as both Paul and Eli because, at that point, it was too late to re-shoot scenes, so the film plays out that Paul is Eli's identical twin. Paul Dano stated to an NPR interviewer that he had less than a week to prepare for the role of Eli.

Why did Daniel kill Eli?

It's rather obvious that Daniel (Daniel Day-Lewis) and Eli have had a feud ever since Daniel snubbed Eli publicly at the dedication of the Little Boston well, and the baptism didn't help nor the money Daniel refused to pay Eli. The fact that H.W. Plainview (Russell Harvard) was now going to be a rival to Daniel caused more fury and anger in him. When Eli visited and told Daniel about Mr. Bandy's land, Daniel had already drained the areas with the wells he'd drilled surrounding that area. Daniel wanted nothing to do with Eli. He killed Eli out of greed and hate. The last line "I'm finished!" meant he was finished with his guest along with his life. It could also mean that Daniel had eliminated his last possible source of competition, Eli. Another explanation lies in Daniel's view of family. He accepted H.W. as his son, as he had control over the child. As H.W. became autonomous, he withdrew from Daniel, destroying Daniel's attempt at family. Eli arrives, telling that he and Daniel are now brothers. As Daniel never sought this creation of family with Eli, he decided to destroy it. A popular explanation of Daniel's killing of Eli and the meaning of the film's final line is that throughout the movie, Daniel devolves into a purely evil human being. From the beginning where he is so poor that he is willing to crawl on his back for miles to claim a silver find to the end where he has become rich and is now almost completely insane, Daniel has descended into becoming truly demonic. Ultimately, he is so evil that the murder of Eli means absolutely nothing to him, and his final line, "I'm finished," cements the fact that he has "finished" his descent into evil. Another interpretation to the final line could be that Daniel meant that he was finished "eating". This could either mean finished eating the meal that can be seen when the two were talking, just before the murder or that he was done "eating" Eli as Daniel can be heard saying "I told you I would eat you up." while he chases Eli around the bowling lane.

In the beach scene, Daniel makes reference to the "Peachtree Dance" and looks at Henry as if expecting an immediate response (presumably this is a dance in their hometown of Fond du Lac, WI). Henry clearly doesn't recognize what Daniel is talking about, and he begins to suspect that Henry is a fraud. He later interrogates Henry further before shooting him.

He didn't want his son to know he was talking business with Tilford. His son had probably, in addition to learning sign language, learned how to read lips. Daniel wanted HW to think they were going out together as a family to a nice restaurant, just as father and son, and he thought HW would be upset that his father was doing business during "their" time together. HW was in a fragile emotional state just after being reunited with Daniel.

The track in question is the third movement (Allegro giocoso, ma non troppo vivace Poco pi presto) of the Konzert fr Violine und Orchestra D-dur (Violin Concerto in D Major), Op. 77 (1878), by Johannes Brahms. A variation can be found here. However, if you want the exact performance as featured in the film, you have to find the version featuring the Berlin Philharmoniker, conducted by Herbert von Karajan and featuring Anne-Sophie Mutter as soloist. (Incidentally, if you watch the credits for the film, they are wrong on this point, and include Antnio Meneses as a second soloist alongside Mutter. This is from the original release of the recording of this concerto, which also featured the Brahms 'Doppelkonzert', Op. 102, which DOES feature Meneses as soloist [on cello, to Mutter's violin].) The best quality release of this particular version of the piece is available here and is selling, at present, for $16.99. It is a pristine mastering of the Concerto from the Deutsche Grammophon Gesellschaft label, which originally released the recording in 1982. A budget version can also be found here.

H.W. is the son of one of Plainview's men in the early part of the film. The boy's father is killed in accident (the film's first death), and he is "adopted" (taken) by Daniel. We are forced to speculate on Plainview's motivations for taking & keeping H.W., though he clearly does not want the fact he is not the boy's biological father public (and this would be why he avoids discussion of the boy's mother). Towards the end of the film, Daniel states that he adopted H.W. in order to have a "sweet face" when purchasing land.

"Convergence" by Jonny Greenwood, guitarist for Radiohead. The song was one of Greenwood's compositions for the soundtrack to the film Bodysong. The version heard in the film is a slight variation of the original and is NOT included on the film's original score, which was also composed by Greenwood. The Bodysong soundtrack is available through Amazon & "Convergence" on that album is very close to the version in this film.

The composer of the film was Jonny Greenwood, primarily famous as the guitarist for the British rock band Radiohead. Paul Thomas Anderson sent Greenwood a copy of the film, and a few weeks later, Greenwood sent back hours and hours of music. Much of the music was scored directly for the film, although a few pieces were taken from Greenwood's prior composition "Popcorn Superhet Receiver", which Greenwood composed as BBC's composer in residence. As for non-Greenwood music, classical pieces by Arvo Part and Johannes Brahms are used in a few places, such as the final scene in the bowling alley and the spudding of the well, but the brunt of the score is Greenwood's original compositions. Unfortunately, the score was ruled ineligible for an Academy Award nomination, due to an AMPAS rule that does not allow 'scores diluted by the use of tracked themes or other pre-existing music.'

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