MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Up 50,342 this week

Torn from the Flag: A Film by Klaudia Kovacs (2007)

8.8
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 8.8/10 from 75 users  
Reviews: 36 user | 7 critic

A sociopolitical historical documentary-thriller about the international decline of communism and the 1956 Hungarian Revolution.

Writers:

, (story)
0Check in
0Share...

Related News

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 601 titles
created 08 Dec 2011
 

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Torn from the Flag: A Film by Klaudia Kovacs (2007)

Torn from the Flag: A Film by Klaudia Kovacs (2007) on IMDb 8.8/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Torn from the Flag: A Film by Klaudia Kovacs.
4 wins. See more awards »

Photos

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
...
Himself
Otto von Habsburg ...
Himself
Edit

Storyline

A sociopolitical historical documentary-thriller about the international decline of communism and the 1956 Hungarian Revolution.

Add Full Plot | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The significant global effects of the Hungarian revolution of 1956

Genres:

Documentary

Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

10 November 2007 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Torn from the Flag: A Film by Klaudia Kovacs  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Budget:

$1,700,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

16:9 HD
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Winner Best of the Fest Minneapolis/St. Paul International Film Festival 2008. See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A masterly account of a crucial episode in the Cold War
11 November 2007 | by (San Diego, CA) – See all my reviews

The Hungarian uprising of 1956 was the first time a people spontaneously overthrew a Communist government and successfully attained freedom -- even if only for a dozen days. The complex tale of how it came to be, and what contributed both to its success and to the all too short-lived duration of that success, combines a host of factors ranging from cynical geopolitical calculation to the individual initiatives of private citizens who discovered that they were not, after all, lacking in power. "Torn from the Flag" makes the myriad strands of the story clear -- even to someone unfamiliar with the history -- in its 97 minutes: and that, by itself, makes it an astonishing achievement.

It is, however, a great deal more. It presents a remarkably balanced account of a subject that still excites visceral passions more than half a century after the event. It offers moments of intense (and intensely moving) human connection, as participants relive their political, moral, spiritual, and physical journeys. And, in reels shot during the revolution by two film students -- Laszlo Kovacs and Vilmos Zsigmond -- it also offers instants of heart-stoppingly beautiful cinema, even when the images are of conflict, destruction, and death. The editing (reducing more than 90 hours of footage to under 100 minutes, still making it all comprehensible), the music (original scoring complementing a brilliantly chosen array of sources -- not least, using perfectly selected passages from Shostakovich's 11th symphony to complement martial scenes), and, above all, the people who gave of their time and their selves to be interviewed, make this a film to contemplate long, long after the house lights come up.

Nobody should think that this film merely rehashes an old tale of no current relevance: the people of Myanmar and Pakistan (to name just two examples) today face situations similar in many respects to that of Hungary 51 years ago.

Kudos to the indefatigable Klaudia Kovacs and her team for surmounting the odds in a nine-year struggle to complete this effort. The result is eminently worth it.


4 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
Photos filminginc
Worth Seeing mistoflove21

Contribute to This Page