Ten Canoes
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20 items from 2006


2006 Australian Film Institute Awards

12 December 2006 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- Ten Canoes, the most critically acclaimed Australian film of the year, swept the Australian Film Institute awards last week. The film depicts the cautionary tale of lust and loyalty that an Aboriginal tribe recounts to a young member. Incredibly it is first feature from Australia made in a language indigenous. The film, directed by the experienced Rolf de Heer and newcomer Peter Djigirr, has been generating award buzz since it was selected, and won a Special Jury Prize, at Cannes earlier this year. On Thursday the film won, Best Direction, the much deserved Best Cinematography for Ian Jones, Best Editing, Best Sound and Best Original Screenplay. Unsurprisingly Ten Canoes also managed to secure the L’Oreal Paris AFI Award for Best Film. De Heer was further honoured with the Brian Kennedy Award, an award that is given in respect of a filmmaker’s relentless pursuit of excellence in filmmaking. »

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6 AFI nods for Aussie Oscar hopeful

12 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

SYDNEY -- Boosting its Oscar hopes, Rolf De Heer and Peter Djigirr's bawdy indigenous-language feature Ten Canoes dominated at Thursday night's Australian Film Institute Awards, Australia's most prestigious film and television prizes.

Ten Canoes picked up the three key awards at the black-tie ceremony: best film; best director, for Rolf de Heer and Peter Djigirr; and best original screenplay, for de Heer. The three nods joined awards for best cinematography, best editing and best sound that Ten Canoes picked up in a special presentation Wednesday night (HR 12/06).

The plaudits didn't stop there. Writer-director De Heer also was honored with the prestigious Byron Kennedy award for excellence in filmmaking, while Ten Canoes cinematographer Ian Jones received the Longford lifetime achievement award for his enduring contribution to Australian screen culture.

The awards have been mounting up for Ten Canoes since it won the Un Certain Regard special jury prize at the Festival de Cannes in May. Last month, it took home the Film Critics Circle of Australia award for best film. »

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6 AFI nods for Aussie Oscar hopeful

7 December 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

SYDNEY -- Boosting its Oscar hopes, Rolf De Heer and Peter Djigirr's bawdy indigenous-language feature Ten Canoes dominated at Thursday night's Australian Film Institute Awards, Australia's most prestigious film and television prizes.

Ten Canoes picked up the three key awards at the black-tie ceremony: best film; best director, for Rolf de Heer and Peter Djigirr; and best original screenplay, for de Heer. The three nods joined awards for best cinematography, best editing and best sound that Ten Canoes picked up in a special presentation Wednesday night (HR 12/06).

The plaudits didn't stop there. Writer-director De Heer also was honored with the prestigious Byron Kennedy award for excellence in filmmaking, while Ten Canoes cinematographer Ian Jones received the Longford lifetime achievement award for his enduring contribution to Australian screen culture.

The awards have been mounting up for Ten Canoes since it won the Un Certain Regard special jury prize at the Festival de Cannes in May. Last month, it took home the Film Critics Circle of Australia award for best film. »

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Noms: Australian Film Institute (AFI) Awards

11 November 2006 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- It is award season in Australia again and the time for the small number of people in the Australian film industry to come together and pat each other on the back for a mostly mediocre job well done. The most prestigious of the three major award ceremonies that occur over the next month is the L’Oreal Paris Australian Film Institute (AFI) Awards. It is the ceremony that attracts big names and they like people to know that. Russell Crowe hosted last year. Who cares if he isn’t actually Australian? This year this ceremony has snagged Australian actor Geoffrey Rush to host, a step up from last year. Pleasingly there are a few nominated films that warrant the caliber of the host. Suburban Mayhem, Kenny and Ten Canoes stand out from the rest for varying reasons and look to be the big winners of the night. Suburban Mayhem »

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Oz critics laud 'Canoes,' 'Jindabyne'

31 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

SYDNEY -- Australia's film critics picked Rolf de Heer's Ten Canoes as their top film of the year Friday at the annual Film Critics Circle of Australia awards ceremony in Melbourne.

Ten Canoes took three awards in total, one shy of the four earned by Jindabyne. Ray Lawrence picked up the best director award for Jindabyne, while the psychological thriller also took nods for best supporting actress (Deborra-Lee Furness) and best adapted screenplay (Beatrix Christian). Jindabyne lenser David Williamson shared his cinematography award with Ten Canoes Ian Jones.

Aside from the top film prize and shared cinematographer honor, Ten Canoes to the best editing prize for Tania Nehme. Balanda and the Bark Canoes, a documentary about the making of Ten Canoes, won the critics prize for best short documentary.

Neil Armfield's Candy picked up two awards: best actress for Abbie Cornish and best supporting actor for Geoffrey Rush.

Privately financed comedy Kenny, which has taken more than AUS$6 million ($4.5 million) at the boxoffice here to date, received two awards --Shane Jacobson received the best actor award and shared the best original screenplay nod with brother Clayton Jacobson.

»

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Foreign Oscar Hopefuls

20 October 2006 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

- As committees from each individual country select their respective submissions for the Best Foreign Picture Academy Award derby, folks like myself have the arduous task of trying to keep score. Without a doubt the early favorite is Germanyâ€.s selection which has already picked up seven German Film Awards this year. Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck's directorial debut takes place in East Berlin, November 1984. Five years before its downfall, the former East-German government ensured its claim to power with a ruthless system of control and surveillance. Party-loyalist Captain Gerd Wiesler hopes to boost his career when given the job of collecting evidence against the playwright Georg Dreyman and his girlfriend, the celebrated theater actress Christa-Maria Sieland. Sony Pictures Classics will release The Lives of Others early next year, though it could be challenged for the Foreign Oscar category by another Spc pic â€. Pedroâ€.s Volver. Also let »

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'Mayhem' leads AFI noms pack

19 October 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

SYDNEY -- Paul Goldman's dark comedy Suburban Mayhem dominated the nominations for the Australian Film Institute Awards announced Thursday, earning recognition in 12 of 15 film categories, but failed to get a nod for best feature film. The top award instead will be fought out between heroin flick Candy, psychological drama Jindabyne, break-out comedy hit Kenny and indigenous-language feature Ten Canoes. Among Suburban Mayhem's 12 noms is one for New Zealander Emily Barclay, a favorite for best actress for her star turn in the film as the murderous teenager Katrina. Barclay also received an acting nomination in the TV category. »

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'Canoes' is Australia's entry for Oscars

4 September 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

SYDNEY-- The first Australian film to be shot in an indigenous language, Rolf de Heer and Peter Djigirr's Ten Canoes, will be Australia's entry for the 2007 Academy Awards in the best foreign-language film category, the Australian Film Commission said Friday. Its Oscar hopes follow the film's jury prize in Un Certain Regard at the Festival de Cannes in May, while de Heer was awarded the Silver Medallion at the Telluride Film Festival over the weekend. Ten Canoes is set to screen at the Toronto International Film Festival this month. AFC acting chief executive Chris Fitchett said of the selection, "'Ten Canoes' is exemplary in terms of the director's vision, the craft of filmmaking and presenting a uniquely Australian story. We are hopeful that the entry of 'Ten Canoes' results in an Academy Award nomination." Ten Canoes was written by de Heer in collaboration with the people of Ramingining, a community of Yolngu people in Central Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, and was shot in the local Ganalbingu language. It tells the story of a young man who covets one of the wives of his older brother. To teach him the proper way, tribal elders retell a story from the mythical past, a story of wrong love, kidnapping, sorcery, mayhem and revenge gone wrong. »

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'Canoes' is Australia's entry for Oscars

4 September 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

SYDNEY-- The first Australian film to be shot in an indigenous language, Rolf de Heer and Peter Djigirr's Ten Canoes, will be Australia's entry for the 2007 Academy Awards in the best foreign-language film category, the Australian Film Commission said Friday. Its Oscar hopes follow the film's jury prize in Un Certain Regard at the Festival de Cannes in May, while de Heer was awarded the Silver Medallion at the Telluride Film Festival over the weekend. Ten Canoes is set to screen at the Toronto International Film Festival this month. AFC acting chief executive Chris Fitchett said of the selection, "'Ten Canoes' is exemplary in terms of the director's vision, the craft of filmmaking and presenting a uniquely Australian story. We are hopeful that the entry of 'Ten Canoes' results in an Academy Award nomination." Ten Canoes was written by de Heer in collaboration with the people of Ramingining, a community of Yolngu people in Central Arnhem Land, Northern Territory, and was shot in the local Ganalbingu language. It tells the story of a young man who covets one of the wives of his older brother. To teach him the proper way, tribal elders retell a story from the mythical past, a story of wrong love, kidnapping, sorcery, mayhem and revenge gone wrong. »

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'Sunshine' honored at Sydney fest

26 June 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

SYDNEY -- U.S. independent films fared well in the prize lineup on the closing night of the Sydney Film Festival this year, with Sundance sparkler Little Miss Sunshine, Hong Kong-U.S. martial arts feature Fearless, documentary An Inconvenient Truth and Brazil/U.S. music documentary Favela Rising, taking home key awards, while local short film, Girl in a Mirror swept the Dendy Awards announced Saturday. Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris' debut feature, Little Miss Sunshine, one of many sold-out sessions at the festival, was the audience favorite, taking away the Urban Cinefile best feature-world cinema award, while Ronny Yu's Fearless, starring Jet Li as 19th century martial arts legend Huo Juan Jia won the audience award for best feature-sidebar program. David Guggenheim's engrossing documentary on climate change, An Inconvenient Truth, presented by former U.S. Vice President Al Gore, won the audience-voted best documentary--world cinema, while the "making of" documentary, that followed the progress of Australian feature Ten Canoes, The Balanda and The Bark Canoes, directed by Molly Reynolds, Tania Nehme and Rolf de Heer, won the best documentary in the sidebar program. »

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'Eagle' lands with Miramax

1 June 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

As business begun at the Festival de Cannes wraps up, Miramax Films has acquired North American rights to the comedy Eagle vs. Shark, the debut feature from New Zealand filmmaker Taika Waititi. Palm Pictures has acquired North American rights to Ten Canoes, an Australian feature directed by Rolf de Heer and co-directed by Peter Djigirr. Waititi's short film Two Cars, One Night was nominated for an Oscar as best live-action short in 2005, and his second short Tamu tu received the Special Jury Prize at the Berlin International Film Festival that same year. His first feature Eagle, a comic account of two misfits searching for acceptance, was developed at the Directors and Screenwriters Lab at the Sundance Institute. Currently in postproduction after shooting in and around Wellington, N.Z., it stars New Zealanders Loren Horsley and Jemaine Clement. Horsley developed the character while collaborating with Waititi on the script. Ainsley Gardiner and Cliff Curtis of Whenua Films are producers. »

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Wang drives 'Car' to win

30 May 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

CANNES -- Chinese director Wang Chao scooped the Prix Un Certain Regard here Sunday, the top prize in the Festival de Cannes' sidebar, for his film Luxury Car. The film follows the journey of an aging country teacher who goes to the city to find his missing son, and finds his daughter is working there as a prostitute. The Certain Regard special jury prize went to Rolf de Heer's ancient Aborigine tale Ten Canoes. Best actor honors in the sidebar were shared by Dorothea Petre for her performance in How I Celebrated the End of the World from Romanian helmer Catalin Mitulescu and Don Angel Tavira for his role in The Violin by Mexico's Francisco Vargas. »

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Wang drives 'Car' to win

30 May 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

CANNES -- Chinese director Wang Chao scooped the Prix Un Certain Regard here Sunday, the top prize in the Festival de Cannes' sidebar, for his film Luxury Car. The film follows the journey of an aging country teacher who goes to the city to find his missing son, and finds his daughter is working there as a prostitute. The Certain Regard special jury prize went to Rolf de Heer's ancient Aborigine tale Ten Canoes. Best actor honors in the sidebar were shared by Dorothea Petre for her performance in How I Celebrated the End of the World from Romanian helmer Catalin Mitulescu and Don Angel Tavira for his role in The Violin by Mexico's Francisco Vargas. »

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Cannes film festival Winners

28 May 2006 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

-  Well the Palmes are given out and it seems political correctness has won again. Everybody got something with the big prizes going to small films The Wind That Shakes The Barley, and Flanders that would have otherwise died at the box office. Volver got two Palmes for directing and acting but should have gotten the Golden one. Also "Babel" got the directing one which I knew it would get but it will collect many awards later this year along with "Volver".As Ken Loach said we live in political times and it didn't escape the jury, specially with China banning the controversial "Summer Place". Next year will be the 60th year of the festival and you can be sure, it will be a nice anniversary. A bientot.The AwardsPalme d'Or: "The Wind That Shakes The Barley" by Ken LoachGrand Prix (runner-up): "Flanders" by Bruno DumontPrix de la Mise »

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Ten Canoes

19 May 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

CANNES -- A joke about flatulence comes early in Australian writer-director Rolf de Heer's tragicomedy Ten Canoes, yet this richly layered film couldn't be further removed from the low-brow concerns of a Hollywood sex comedy.

Set a thousand years ago in Australia's far northern Arnhem Land, it manages to skirt the issue of race relations, a hot-button topic in a country where black and white Australians are still coming to grips with their recent disharmonious history. Yet, in telling this ancient story with style and humor, de Heer and his Aboriginal collaborators promote cultural understanding and acceptance by stealth, if you will.

The beauty of the otherworldly landscapes and the authenticity of the detail gleaned from anthropologist Donald Thomson's mid-1930s photographs will appeal to arthouse audiences, and the film should have legs on the international festival circuit. (It will open the Sydney Film Festival on June 9, ahead of its Australian release June 29.)

De Heer's latest outing -- co-directed by Peter Djigirr and written in collaboration with the Arnhem Land community of Ramingining -- is playful where his 2002 political allegory The Tracker was potent.

Frequent bursts of bawdy humor are as unexpected as they are welcome, leavening the ethnographic raw material and providing handy points of entry into the first Australian feature shot entirely in a number of indigenous languages, predominantly Ganalbingu.

This mythic history lesson also is buoyed by naturalistic performances from a cast of first-time Aboriginal actors and chatty narration by the legendary David Gulpilil.

Ten Canoes opens with a grand aerial swoop over the remote Arafura swamp region of northeast Arnhem Land while Gulpilil's Storyteller solemnly intones: "Once upon a time in a land far, far away ..." The spell is broken -- and a capricious tone set -- when the voice cracks up at the fairytale stereotype and says, I'm only joking.

Old Minygululu (Peter Minygululu) discovers that his younger brother Dayindi (played by Gulpilil's 22-year-old son, Jamie) covets his third and youngest wife, and decides to tell him an ancestral story to, in the words of the narrator, "help him live proper way."

The screen is saturated with color as this parable -- set in the mythical past -- begins. The action then switches nimbly between the two periods for the remainder of the film.

Minygululu's cautionary tale concerns Yeeralparil (also played by Jamie Gulpilil), a young single man who desires one of the wives of his older brother, Ridjimiraril (sculptor and dancer Crusoe Kurddal.)

The core story is a relatively simple one of forbidden love, made epic by the many narrative offshoots and asides that flesh out the meandering tale. Soon we are up to our ears in kidnapping, sorcery, murder and bloody revenge -- though de Heer always has time for a jokey aside about the rampaging sweet tooth of the Honey Man (Richard Birrinbirrin.)

Ian Jones' superb photography underscores the majestic beauty of the landscapes and leaves a lingering impression, while intuitive editing by Tania Nehme keeps the narrative threads from tangling. Kudos also to the cast and crew for enduring the hard slog of a weeks-long shoot fending off leeches, mosquitoes and crocodiles in the unforgiving swamplands of Australia's top end.

TEN CANOES

Vertigo Prods./Fandango Australia

Credits:

Director-screenwriter: Rolf de Heer

Co-director: Peter Djigirr

Producers: Rolf de Heer, Julie Ryan

Executive producers: Sue Murray, Domenico Procacci, Bryce Menzies

Director of photography: Ian Jones

Production designer: Beverley Freeman

Co-producers: Richard Birrinbirrin, Belinda Scott, Nils Erik Nielsen

Costumes: Beverley Freeman

Editor: Tania Nehme

Cast:

Ridjimiraril: Crusoe Kurddal

Dayindi/Yeeralparil: Jamie Gulpilil

Honey Man: Richard Birrinbirrin

Minygululu: Peter Minygululu

Nowalingu: Frances Djulibing

The Storyteller: David Gulpilil

The Sorcerer: Philip Gudthaykudthay

The Stranger: Michael Dawu

No MPAA rating

Running time -- 91 minutes »

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Live from Cannes 2006!

17 May 2006 | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

-  [Ed's note: This website is only possible with the help of some great folks - and before we get to the Cannes business - I'd like to intro y'all to our Cannes correspondent. Now in his second year attending the festival, Mr.Yama Rahimi will be our eyes and ears of the fest - relaying what we should be checking out in the near future. Yama was born in Kabul, Afghanistan; attended school in Germany; studied photography, web and graphic design before attending Los Angeles Film School to study film. He has written, produced and directed two short films. Prior to arriving on the Riviera, he was teaching students at Kabul University on Cinema. I'll be hard at work after this working holiday - he is currently developing several feature films. I asked Yama to list the films he is most looking forward to seeing at year's edition. Look for Yama's impression of this year’s slate – in easy capsule form reviews in the coming days. My two dollars for the Palme d'or goes to Fast Food Nation...I'm curious to see what Yama's pick will be...] The Official Selection 1. Volver by Pedro ALMODÓVAR 2. INDIGÈNES by Rachid Bouchareb 3. Iklimler (Climates) by Nuri Bilge Ceylan 4. Marie Antoinette by Sofia Coppola 5. Babel by Alejandro González IÑÁRRITU 6. Southland Tales by Richard Kelly 7. Fast Food Nation by Richard Linklater 8. Summer Palace by Lou Ye Un Certain Regard1. Paris, Je T'aime by 20 directors 2. Ten Canoes by Rolf De Heer 3. Salvador by Manuel Huerga 4. Bihisht Faqat Baroi Murdagon (To Get To Heaven First You Have To Die) by Djamshed Usmonov Out of Competition1. The Da Vinci Code 2. Shortbus 3. The Last Adventure (1967) by Robert Enrico 4. Odd Man Out (1947) by Carol Reed »

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Native 'Canoes' kicks off 53rd Sydney film festival

11 May 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

SYDNEY -- A focus on Latin America and Danish cinema, the return of a substantial number of Australian films, and three soccer-themed documentaries are the hallmarks of this year's Sydney Film Festival, which kicks off June 9 and runs through June 25. Opening night for the 53rd festival will feature a screening of ground-breaking, indigenous-themed feature Ten Canoes, by Rolf de Heer and the people of Ramingining. The film will unspool just three weeks after screening in Un Certain Regard at the Festival de Cannes and three weeks before its general release here. Lynden Barbers' second program as artistic director will see some new ticketing initiatives, while a three-year plan being implemented by the new board is expected to revitalize the festival and put it back in the black after four years of deficits, festival president Jacquie Feeney said Thursday at the launch of the festival program. »

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2 Australian features selected for Cannes lineup

21 April 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

SYDNEY -- The beleaguered Australian film industry received a shot in the arm Thursday with the announcement that two features set for release this year have been chosen as official selections for next month's Festival de Cannes. Paul Goldman's Suburban Mayhem, a dark comedy from first time screenwriter Alice Bell, and Rolf de Heer's indigenous feature Ten Canoes will both screen as part of the festival's Un Certain Regard sidebar. Both films are, at their heart, very Australian -- one, a mythical, dreamtime telling of an aboriginal story; the other, a fast-paced comedy shining a light on the nation's suburban underbelly. »

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2 Australian features selected for Cannes lineup

20 April 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

SYDNEY -- The beleaguered Australian film industry received a shot in the arm Thursday with the announcement that two features set for release this year have been chosen as official selections for next month's Festival de Cannes. Paul Goldman's Suburban Mayhem, a dark comedy from first time screenwriter Alice Bell, and Rolf de Heer's indigenous feature Ten Canoes will both screen as part of the festival's Un Certain Regard sidebar. Both films are, at their heart, very Australian -- one, a mythical, dreamtime telling of an aboriginal story; the other, a fast-paced comedy shining a light on the nation's suburban underbelly. »

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2 Australian features selected for Cannes lineup

20 April 2006 | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

SYDNEY -- The beleaguered Australian film industry received a shot in the arm Thursday with the announcement that two features set for release this year have been chosen as official selections for next month's Festival de Cannes. Paul Goldman's Suburban Mayhem, a dark comedy from first time screenwriter Alice Bell, and Rolf de Heer's indigenous feature Ten Canoes will both screen as part of the festival's Un Certain Regard sidebar. Both films are, at their heart, very Australian -- one, a mythical, dreamtime telling of an aboriginal story; the other, a fast-paced comedy shining a light on the nation's suburban underbelly. »

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20 items from 2006


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