6.7/10
15,055
72 user 142 critic

The Hoax (2006)

R | | Comedy, Drama | 20 April 2007 (USA)
In what would cause a fantastic media frenzy, Clifford Irving sells his bogus biography of Howard Hughes to a premiere publishing house in the early 1970s.

Director:

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(screenplay), (book)

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1 win & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Brad Silber
John Carter ...
Harold Mcgraw
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Marion
Raul S. Julia ...
Bike Messenger (as Raul Julia Jr.)
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Mcgraw-Hill Security
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Albert Vanderkamp
Okwui Okpokwasili ...
Malika
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Sporting Goods Salesman
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Car Salesman
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Fredrick Van Pallandt
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Storyline

Early in 1971, McGraw-Hill passes on Clifford Irving's new novel. He's desperate for money, so, against the backdrop of Nixon's reelection calculations, Irving claims he has Howard Hughes's cooperation to write Hughes's autobiography. With the help of friend Dick Suskind, Irving does research, lucks into a manuscript written by a long-time Hughes associate, and plays on corporate greed. He's quick-thinking and outrageously bold. Plus, he banks on Hughes's reluctance to enter the public eye. At the same time, he's trying to rebuild his marriage and deflect the allure of his one-time mistress, Nina Van Pallandt. Can he write a good book, take the money, and pull off the hoax? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Based on the true story. Would we lie to you? See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

20 April 2007 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Beugratás  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$25,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

€349,000 (Italy) (23 October 2006)

Gross:

$7,156,933 (USA) (27 May 2007)
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1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Richard Gere appears with the real Nina van Pallandt (played here by Julie Delpy) in American Gigolo (1980). See more »

Goofs

As Irving first researches Hughes for the hoax, he picks up an edition of Newsweek bearing the title "The Secret World of Howard Hughes," and dated 1971. He actually has the April 19, 1976 issue of Newsweek, which was printed after Hughes's death and included a sketch of Hughes during the last few years of his life. See more »

Quotes

Edith Irving: You're always so careful when you talk, always so soft like a cushion for what you want. But I am leaving. But before I go, I give you something. You are exhausted from your lies. So tell the truth. Tell me the truth about what you did with her this time. It is your moment to be clean.
Clifford Irving: I saw her.
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Connections

References F for Fake (1973) See more »

Soundtracks

Nixon's the One
Written by Vic Caesar and Ray Cork Jr.
Performed by Vic Caesar
Courtesy of Juliet Cesario
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Enjoyable "True Crime" Farce
15 April 2007 | by (New Jersey, USA) – See all my reviews

"The Hoax" is a rollicking good time at the movies. It's a strongly written, competently directed, and well acted character study of a pathological liar, Clifford Irving. This amazing true story details the complex hoax staged by Irving, a man who in the 1970's fooled a major publisher and LIFE magazine into thinking he was writing an authorized biography of Howard Hughes. Most of the fun emerges from the extreme lengths Irving (Richard Gere) and his best friend and partner (Alfred Molina) go to pull off the hair-brained scheme. The more outrageous the lies they concoct, the more believable they become and the more money gets thrown at them.

Richard Gere has never been that good of an actor, but he's always had an arrogant charm that makes him oddly likable, and he uses that to its full extent in what is probably his most mature performance here as Clifford Irving, a arrogantly likable and charming liar. He's surrounded by a fantastic supporting cast in Alfred Molina (as his sympathetic and often comical side-kick), Marcia Gay Harden (donning blonde hair and a European accent as his long-suffering but eager to con wife), and Hope Davis (playing his publishing industry connection). Davis probably gets the best line in the film when she says to a coworker who unwittingly foils a "staged" face-to-face meeting with Hughes, "Pray that you drop dead."

The film starts slowly and plays things for "winks and laughs" and light drama. It gets slightly bogged down in the final act as the hoax crumbles under its own preposterous weight and some scenes get heavy on the melodrama. There's also some wishy-washy "conspiracy" theories floating around about the Nixon administration and Howard Hughes that maybe somewhat true, but might be another figment of Irving's fanciful imagination as this is based on his "memoirs" of the events.

These few flaws, however, don't sink the ship as the playful cast and sure-handed direction from Lasse Hallstrom (in what his probably his best work since "Cider House Rules") keep the hoax firmly afloat. What the film ultimately excels in is the connections it makes with Irving's pathological personality (that ultimately leads to severe paranoia and delusions of grandeur), the paranoia of the Nixon administration (that mirrors nicely the modern Bush administration), and the alleged over-the-top eccentricities of the infamous Howard Hughes. In his mind Irving intertwines himself with these two powerful and tragic men. The film highlights how Irving saw himself and Hughes as smooth-talking, larcenous megalomaniacs, and truly believed he was going to be a major player in world history with the take down of Nixon even though he never had direct contact with either man and based his story on gossip, hearsay, and innuendos. It's really not much of a stretch to imagine Hughes bribing Nixon and wielding power like the wizard behind the curtain in Oz, and it makes for a well told tale. Whether we believe the story ultimately lies in how much power we allow each of these men to have. In his image, Irving thought Hughes held power over everyone, and for Irving, his tiny part in all that was the greatest story of all.


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