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The Tower of Nesle (1909)

La tour de Nesle (original title)
Marguerite de Bourgogne had her father, the Duke of Bourgogne, murdered by Buridan, her page and lover. Once her aim achieved, she tried to get rid both of Buridan and of the two sons, ... See full summary »

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(play) (as Alexandre Dumas père), (play)
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Cast

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Buridan
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Gaultier d'Aulnay (as Alexandre)
Andrée Mégard ...
Andrée Pascal
Paul Capellani

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Storyline

Marguerite de Bourgogne had her father, the Duke of Bourgogne, murdered by Buridan, her page and lover. Once her aim achieved, she tried to get rid both of Buridan and of the two sons, Philippe and Gaultier, they had together. But, not only did Buridan manage to escape but Landry, the man assigned to kill the two children, was moved to pity by their lot and could not bring himself to stab them to death. Twenty years later, Buridan is back from war in Paris; Marguerite has become the Queen of France and the two babies are now handsome knights. More pervert than ever, Marguerite lures men into the Tower of Nesle where she makes love to them before getting them killed and thrown into the River Seine. Worse, her present favorite is now Gaultier, who she does not know is her own son. As for Buridan, she tries one more time to eliminate him by accusing him falsely and having him imprisoned... Written by Guy Bellinger

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Genres:

Short | Drama | History

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Release Date:

22 September 1909 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Tower of Nesle  »

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1.33 : 1
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Connections

Version of La tour de Nesle (1937) See more »

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User Reviews

A complete picture that could be painted by an artist
7 January 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

The reception of this film by the public fully justified the advance notice given in last week's Moving Picture World. It is, as should be, a series of moving pictures and not a moving picture record. The composition of the scenes in this film are so well thought out that every little section that goes to make up the hundreds of exposures forms a complete picture that could be painted by an artist. What we mean by composition is this: The arranging of the scenery, properties and actors in their proper relation to the picture and that each unit takes its place and forms an agreeable whole, according to the accepted principles of art. The lighting and photography in this film is an object lesson to be studied by beginners in the field. There is just one thing in the whole ensemble that did not meet our taste, and that was the heroic size of the figures in one or two scenes. Seen on a large screen such as Keith & Proctor's, the effect of figures of men and women nine and ten feet high was hardly in keeping with the exquisite taste otherwise displayed in the production. - The Moving Picture World, October 9, 1909


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