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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

1-20 of 64 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


The Laura Dern-aissance: From Blacklisted After ‘Ellen’ to 2017 Scene-Stealer of ‘Big Little Lies’ and ‘Twin Peaks’

23 June 2017 8:25 AM, PDT | Entertainment Tonight | See recent Entertainment Tonight news »

A formidable actress, Laura Dern has been working in Hollywood since age 5. At 13 years old, the daughter of icons Diane Ladd and Bruce Dern became the youngest Miss Golden Globe and soon thereafter earned critical acclaim with her breakout role in Blue Velvet. The 1986 film also marked the first time Dern and director David Lynch would work together throughout her career, a pairing that continues with Twin Peaks’ celebrated return on Showtime.

Known for her highly emotive face, »

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J. Hoberman’s Best Movies of the 21st Century

20 June 2017 2:50 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

There have been a lot of lists about the best films of the 21st century. IndieWire has been digging through the last two decades one genre at a time; meanwhile, the New York Times’ top movie critics provided their own takes. J. Hoberman, the longtime Village Voice film critic who now works as a freelancer, decided to join the fray. Here’s his take, also available at his site, and republished here with permission. 

People have been asking me, so I thought I might as well join (or crash) the party initiated by the New York Times and put in my two cents regarding the 25 Best Films of the 21st Century (so far). I don’t see “everything” anymore and I haven’t been to Cannes since 2011.

There is some overlap but this is not the same as the proposed 21-film syllabus of 21st Century cinema included in my book “Film After Film.” Those were all in their way pedagogical choices. Begging the question of what “best” means, these are all movies that I really like, that I’m happy to see multiple times, that are strongly of their moment and that I think will stand the test of time.

My single “best” film-object is followed by a list of 11 filmmakers and one academic production company (in order of “best-ness”) responsible for two or more “best films,” these followed by another eight individual movies (again in order) and finally four more tentatively advanced films (these alphabetical). I’m sure I’m forgetting some but that’s the nature of the beast.

Christian Marclay: “The Clock

Lars von Trier: “Dogville” & “Melancholia” (and none of his others)

Hou Hsiao Hsien: “The Assassin” & “Flight of the Red Balloon

Jean-Luc Godard: “In Praise of Love” & “Goodbye to Language”

David Cronenberg: “Spider,” “A History of Violence,” “Eastern Promises,” & “A Dangerous Method

David Lynch: “Mulholland Drive” & “Inland Empire

Ken Jacobs: “Seeking the Monkey King,” “The Guests” (and more)

Cristi Puiu: “The Death of Mr Lazarescu” & “Aurora

Chantal Akerman: “No Home Movie” & “La Captive” (assuming that 2000 is part of the 21st Century)

Paul Thomas Anderson: “The Master” & “There Will Be Blood

Kathryn Bigelow: “The Hurt Locker” & “Zero Dark Thirty

Alfonso Cuarón: “Gravity” & “Children of Men

Sensory Ethnology Lab: “Leviathan,” “Manakamana,” & “People’s Park”

“The Strange Case of Angelica” — Manoel de Oliviera

“Corpus Callosum” — Michael Snow

“West of the Tracks” — Wang Bing

“Carlos” — Olivier Assayas

“Che” — Steven Soderbergh

“Ten” — Abbas Kariostami

“Russian Ark” — Aleksandr Sokurov

“The World” — Jia Zhangke

Citizenfour” — Laura Poitras

Day Night Day Night” — Julia Loktev

“Once Upon a Time in Anatolia” — Nuri Bilge Ceylan

Wall-e” — Andrew Stanton

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- J. Hoberman

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The (Twin) ‘Peaks’ Are Alive With the Sound of Dean Hurley’s Music: A Chat With David Lynch’s Longtime MD

19 June 2017 12:56 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

On “Part 6” of David Lynch’s “Twin Peaks: The Return,” the much heralded look at the surreal Pacific Northwest town 25 years after the mysterious murder of Laura Palmer, the character of Richard Horne — warning: spoilers ahead — recklessly runs over and kills a young child. That this heart-pounding moment was accompanied by the equally unsettling new music of legendary composer and Lynch regular Angelo Badalamenti was reason enough for “Twin Peaks” music director, sound supervisor, and re-recording mixer Dean Hurley to come out of hiding.

Hurley, a longtime collaborator of Lynch’s — maybe the most trusted — is the man responsible for co-writing and performing pieces of music for Showtime’s “Twin Peaks” – “SubDream” and “Snake Eyes” with the director and/or his son, Riley Lynch – and co-selecting new-school indie acts such as Chromatics, Sharon Van Etten, and Au Revoir Simone to play the local Bang Bang Bar at the end of each “part” (as well as appear »

- A.D. Amorosi

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Filmadrid & Mubi: The Video Essay—"永遠の処女 - The Eternal Virgin"

9 June 2017 7:31 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The Video Essay is a joint project of Mubi and Filmadrid Festival Internacional de Cine. Film analysis and criticism found a completely new and innovative path with the arrival of the video essay, a relatively recent form that already has its own masters and is becoming increasingly popular. The limits of this discipline are constantly expanding; new essayists are finding innovative ways to study the history of cinema working with images. With this non-competitive section of the festival both Mubi and Filmadrid will offer the platform and visibility the video essay deserves. The seven selected works will be shown during the dates of Filmadrid (June 8 - 17, 2017) on Mubi’s cinema publication, the Notebook. Also there will be a free public screening of the selected works during the festival. The selection was made by the programmers of Mubi and Filmadrid.永遠の処女 · The Eternal VirginVideo essay by Jorge Suárez-Quiñones RivasThe understanding of domestic, »

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"Twin Peaks," Episode 5 Recap: I Love How You Love Me

6 June 2017 3:19 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.The key image in Part 5 of the revived Twin Peaks is of a woman in ecstasy. Recall, however, the subtitle that series co-creator/director David Lynch appended to his thorny 2006 masterpiece Inland Empire: "A Woman in Trouble." The line separating rapture and anguish is a blurry one, especially for Lynch's ladies, who are as likely to end up exquisitely chiseled corpses (the ubiquitous Laura Palmer; Part 2's doomed henchwoman Darya) as they are world-weary survivors. For the moment, let's focus on Rebecca "Becky" Burnett (Amanda Seyfried), daughter of Rr Diner waitress Shelly Johnson (Mädchen Amick), though Becky's last name—taken from ne'er-do-well husband Steven Burnett (Caleb Landry Jones)—obscures the identity of her father. (Dana Ashbrook's now-law-abiding Bobby Briggs is the most likely candidate, »

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Twin Peaks 2017 Episode 5 Review: These ‘Case Files’ Are Worth Perusing, Even If They Don’t Answer Many Questions

4 June 2017 9:40 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Hello-o-o! Now that we’ve all binged the first four episodes of the “Twin Peaks” revival and waited two weeks like the good residents of the Black Lodge that we are, part five is now upon us. “Case Files” isn’t as wild a ride as some of what we’ve already seen, which is what makes it ideal as the first standalone episode: Its oddity is the kind that will take longer to digest, though one hopes it goes down more easily than garmonbozia.

David Lynch, by all accounts, is not a fan of the binge-watching approach to television. After this latest episode, it’s easy to see why: There’s nothing as outwardly jarring as the glass-box monster or Evil Cooper’s endless stream of vomit, and so “Case Files” might easily get lost in the shuffle of an hours-long binge. Watching it on its lonesome, however, we »

- Michael Nordine

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Twin Peaks 2017 Episode 5 Review: These ‘Case Files’ Are Worth Perusing, Even If They Don’t Answer Many Questions

4 June 2017 9:40 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Hello-o-o! Now that we’ve all binged the first four episodes of the “Twin Peaks” revival and waited two weeks like the good residents of the Black Lodge that we are, part five is now upon us. “Case Files” isn’t as wild a ride as some of what we’ve already seen, which is what makes it ideal as the first standalone episode: Its oddity is the kind that will take longer to digest, though one hopes it goes down more easily than garmonbozia.

David Lynch, by all accounts, is not a fan of the binge-watching approach to television. After this latest episode, it’s easy to see why: There’s nothing as outwardly jarring as the glass-box monster or Evil Cooper’s endless stream of vomit, and so “Case Files” might easily get lost in the shuffle of an hours-long binge. Watching it on its lonesome, however, we »

- Michael Nordine

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‘Twin Peaks': A Melancholic Day in the Life of Dougie in “Part 5″

4 June 2017 8:48 PM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

It's hard to get ahold of anything in the moment when it comes to David Lynch, at least at first blush. About an hour into my first viewing of Inland Empire, I was quite literally checking where the exits were in Alice Tully Hall in the hopes that a brief leave from Lynch's miasma would give me better bearings. And attempting to hone in on what Lynch has been circling in these latest episodes of Twin Peaks hasn't exactly been a cakewalk, though there was finally some sense of the scope of Lynch's latest vision that … »

- Chris Cabin

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Great Job, Internet!: The world needs to know how David Lynch’s beef with 5 Woody Woodpecker dolls began

2 June 2017 10:26 AM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

David Lynch’s creative process is the stuff of legends. His affection for transcendental meditation is well known, but individual anecdotes from that process—like the way Blue Velvet began with the germ of an idea about an ear found within a field, or Laura Dern’s retelling of the credits sequence for Inland Empire—get passed around long after the fact, not as keys to understanding his work but almost as creative additions to them. The 20 hours of new work currently unfolding on Twin Peaks’ third season will surely go on to generate plenty such legends, but one is making the rounds again now. It is the story of David Lynch’s tempestuous friendship with five Woody Woodpecker dolls, with whom he is no longer on speaking terms.

The story has been kicking around for years, but it was renewed by Lynch’s comments on the dolls in ...

»

- Clayton Purdom

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David Lynch’s ‘Twin Peaks’ Goes ‘Eraserhead’ & Absurdist Comedy [Episodes 3 & 4 Recap]

30 May 2017 9:57 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

**Spoilers ahead if you haven’t seen the show.**

And you thought that last episode was weird. David Lynch’s “Twin Peaks” goes off the edge in this week’s two episodes. Like a modern update on “Eraserhead,” the beginning of episode three, “Call For Help,” is some kind of spellbinding bewitchery, featuring easily the strangest, most unsettling images that Lynch has committed to celluloid since the rabbit scenes in “Inland Empire” or some of his early experimental short films, of which the opening scene of episode 3 is very reminiscent.

Continue reading David Lynch’s ‘Twin Peaks’ Goes ‘Eraserhead’ & Absurdist Comedy [Episodes 3 & 4 Recap] at The Playlist. »

- Rodrigo Perez

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"Twin Peaks," Episodes 3 & 4 Recap: Hell-o-o-o-o-o-o-o-o!

30 May 2017 8:44 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Twin Peaks Recap is a weekly column by Keith Uhlich covering David Lynch and Mark Frost's limited, 18-episode continuation of the Twin Peaks television series.What's an FBI Special Agent to do after being locked away for 25 years in unearthly purgatory? Episodes three and four of Mark Frost and David Lynch's revived Twin Peaks, which aired on Showtime this past Sunday in a two-hour block (aside from September's two-part finale, it's all single, hour-long episodes from hereon out), follow our besuited, Black Lodge-incarcerated hero Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) as he reintegrates into modern terrestrial society. So this is basically Peaks doing Rectify, just with a sterile death row replaced by an infernal hellscape out of Clive Barker. Or David Lynch, really. What's becoming more and more evident as the new Peaks progresses is that the series is, in large part, a repository for Lynch's subconscious, past and present. »

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'Twin Peaks' Recap: Keeping Up With the Joneses

28 May 2017 7:00 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

His name is Dougie Jones. He has a beer gut, a bad haircut, an even worse selection of sportjackets and a penchant for adultery in vacant development housing. And he does not exist.

Dougie is the mystical creation of Agent Dale Cooper's doppelganger – a living, breathing bait-and-switch brought into existence, somehow, to get sucked into the Black Lodge in the evil being's place. So when Coop returns to the real world, it's this poor sap who gets airlifted into the afterlife. The Bad Dale may vomit up poison and get himself arrested, »

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Update: David Lynch is not retiring from filmmaking

26 May 2017 1:20 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

David Lynch is returning to the town of Twin Peaks this month, having directed all eighteen episodes of Showtime’s revival of his cult 90s series, but if you were hoping he might follow this up by getting back behind the camera for another feature film, we have some bad news for you

Asked by The Sydney Morning Herald whether 2006’s Inland Empire will prove to be his last film, Lynch responded:

“Yes it is. Things changed a lot. So many films were not doing well at the box office even though they might have been great films and the things that were doing well at the box office weren’t the things that I would want to do.”

Update: It seems that Lynch has not called time on features after all, with the filmmaker revealing at the Cannes premiere of Twin Peaks that: “My remarks have been misrepresented. I »

- Gary Collinson

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David Lynch Backtracks On His Comments That He’ll Never Make Another Movie Again

26 May 2017 11:35 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

After releasing “Inland Empire” in 2006, director David Lynch stayed creative with lots of projects — music, short films, and other artistic endeavors — but didn’t get back behind the camera in any substantial way until the newly revived “Twin Peaks.” However, fans hoping that Lynch would return to the arthouse as well with a new film were left disappointed when he stated he was never going to make another movie, citing the current industry landscape, and concerns his kind of creations wouldn’t be financially viable.

Continue reading David Lynch Backtracks On His Comments That He’ll Never Make Another Movie Again at The Playlist. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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David Lynch Is Not Retiring From Filmmaking After All, But His Future Still Remains Unclear

26 May 2017 7:02 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

David Lynch fans went into mourning earlier this month when the director revealed to the Sydney Morning Herald that his filmmaking career was over. When asked if “Inland Empire” was his last movie, the director responded with a point blank “yes,” and he cited the dominance of blockbusters and the growing lack of interest in art house films as the main reason why.

Read More: David Lynch’s ‘Twin Peaks’ Receives Standing Ovation at Cannes

“Things changed a lot,” Lynch told the newspaper. “So many films were not doing well at the box office even though they might have been great films and the things that were doing well at the box office weren’t the things that I would want to do.”

Even though we’re lucky enough to have “Twin Peaks” back in our lives this summer, the thought of never seeing a new Lynch movie on the »

- Zack Sharf

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‘Twin Peaks’: Where Food Is a Signifier of Virtue, and Only Heroes Deserve Pie

24 May 2017 10:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from the first four episodes of Showtime’s “Twin Peaks.”]

Much is made of the joy that pie and donuts and coffee bring to the characters on “Twin Peaks.” In the original series, Special Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) went into raptures over the “damn fine coffee” at the Great Northern Hotel’s restaurant and declared the cherry pie at the Double R Diner was so good it could “kill ya.”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’: A Guide to Returned Characters and How They’re Helping Cooper – Parts 1 & 2

Cooper’s obsession with the town’s cuisine could be interpreted as an appreciation of life’s simple pleasures or merely as an extension of series co-creator David Lynch’s love of food. After all, the director notoriously once used a cow as part of an Oscar campaign stunt because without milk, “Inland Empire” would never have been made, since Lynch had eaten a lot of cheese while making the film. And »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Twin Peaks’: Where Food Is a Signifier of Virtue, and Only Heroes Deserve Pie

24 May 2017 10:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s Note: The following contains spoilers from the first four episodes of Showtime’s “Twin Peaks.”]

Much is made of the joy that pie and donuts and coffee bring to the characters on “Twin Peaks.” In the original series, Special Agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) went into raptures over the “damn fine coffee” at the Great Northern Hotel’s restaurant and declared the cherry pie at the Double R Diner was so good it could “kill ya.”

Read More: ‘Twin Peaks’: A Guide to Returned Characters and How They’re Helping Cooper – Parts 1 & 2

Cooper’s obsession with the town’s cuisine could be interpreted as an appreciation of life’s simple pleasures or merely as an extension of series co-creator David Lynch’s love of food. After all, the director notoriously once used a cow as part of an Oscar campaign stunt because without milk, “Inland Empire” would never have been made, since Lynch had eaten a lot of cheese while making the film. And »

- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Twin Peaks: Season 3 – Episodes 1 & 2′ Review

22 May 2017 12:01 PM, PDT | Blogomatic3000 | See recent Blogomatic3000 news »

Twin Peaks is finally back, and yes as almost every review is probably saying, it is worth the wait. What we have though is something a little different from the Twin Peaks we know. This is David Lynch giving us his full vision, and while special, don’t expect to understand everything you see. In many ways though, that is the point of the show.

When the Log Lady’s (Catherine E. Coulson) has a message for Deputy Hark (Michael Horse) the case of Agent Cooper’s (Kyle MacLachlan) is examined. Is it time for the mystery of Cooper’s disappearance to be finally solved and could he be returning?

Presenting the first two episodes together is the perfect way to bring back Twin Peaks. It feels like an event, and for fans it is an event that has been waited for, for a long time. We finally get to see where Cooper is, »

- Paul Metcalf

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David Lynch’s Glass Box Murders in ‘Twin Peaks’ Are a Key to Understanding the Revival Series

22 May 2017 10:37 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Just 35 minutes into the new “Twin Peaks,” the woman sitting next to me looked over and said, “Holy shit.”

We’d never met before, but I responded in kind. The two of us were far from alone: Everyone at the “Twin Peaks” world premiere had just let out a collective gasp after witnessing one of the most unsettling moments in David Lynch’s oeuvre. Considering the Winkie’s Scene in “Mulholland Drive,” the hallway phantom from “Inland Empire” and pretty much every moment of “Eraserhead,” that’s no small feat.

We were all at downtown Los Angeles’ Theatre at the Ace Hotel for the long-awaited return to “Twin Peaks,” which up until that moment I wasn’t fully onboard with. I found myself resisting the extended sequence, which takes place in New York and features characters (played by Ben Rosenfield and Madeline Zima) we’ve never met before. I kept »

- Michael Nordine

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David Lynch’s Glass Box Murders in ‘Twin Peaks’ Are a Key to Understanding the Revival Series

22 May 2017 10:37 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Just 35 minutes into the new “Twin Peaks,” the woman sitting next to me looked over and said, “Holy shit.”

We’d never met before, but I responded in kind. The two of us were far from alone: Everyone at the “Twin Peaks” world premiere had just let out a collective gasp after witnessing one of the most unsettling moments in David Lynch’s oeuvre. Considering the Winkie’s Scene in “Mulholland Drive,” the hallway phantom from “Inland Empire” and pretty much every moment of “Eraserhead,” that’s no small feat.

We were all at downtown Los Angeles’ Theatre at the Ace Hotel for the long-awaited return to “Twin Peaks,” which up until that moment I wasn’t fully onboard with. I found myself resisting the extended sequence, which takes place in New York and features characters (played by Ben Rosenfield and Madeline Zima) we’ve never met before. I kept »

- Michael Nordine

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

1-20 of 64 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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