The Fall
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guide
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb


News for
The Fall (2006) More at IMDbPro »


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

4 items from 2017


‘The Handmaid’s Tale’: How Director Reed Morano Made Margaret Atwood’s Classic Novel Cinematic

7 January 2017 11:44 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

How do you turn one woman’s inner narrative into something visceral? Especially when that woman is describing the horrific dystopia in which she’s trapped? That’s the challenge director Reed Morano faced when she took on Hulu’s upcoming adaptation of “The Handmaid’s Tale” — and it was one that she relished.

“I just pitched the craziest ideas I could,” Morano told IndieWire on Saturday at the Television Critics Association press tour.

Showrunner Bruce Miller described the series, set in a dystopian world that subjugates women, as a “thriller.” But it’s also an intimate depiction of life in this terrifying world, told almost entirely from the point of view of Offred (Elisabeth Moss), a young woman forced essentially into sexual slavery.

Read More: The Handmaid’s Tale’ Trailer: Elisabeth Moss Risks It All in Hulu Adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s Drama

Margaret Atwood’s original novel lives entirely in Offred’s head, »

- Liz Shannon Miller

Permalink | Report a problem


‘The Handmaid’s Tale’: How Director Reed Morano Made Margaret Atwood’s Classic Novel Cinematic

7 January 2017 11:44 PM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

How do you turn one woman’s inner narrative into something visceral? Especially when that woman is describing the horrific dystopia in which she’s trapped? That’s the challenge director Reed Morano faced when she took on Hulu’s upcoming adaptation of “The Handmaid’s Tale” — and it was one that she relished.

“I just pitched the craziest ideas I could,” Morano told IndieWire on Saturday at the Television Critics Association press tour.

Showrunner Bruce Miller described the series, set in a dystopian world that subjugates women, as a “thriller.” But it’s also an intimate depiction of life in this terrifying world, told almost entirely from the point of view of Offred (Elisabeth Moss), a young woman forced essentially into sexual slavery.

Read More: The Handmaid’s Tale’ Trailer: Elisabeth Moss Risks It All in Hulu Adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s Drama

Margaret Atwood’s original novel lives entirely in Offred’s head, »

- Liz Shannon Miller

Permalink | Report a problem


Emerald City episode 1 review: The Beast Forever

5 January 2017 11:17 PM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Kayti Burt Feb 8, 2017

The best parts of Emerald City are also the least iconic in this NBC TV drama based on The Wizard of Oz, now airing in the UK...

This review contains minor spoilers and slight references to later episodes.

See related  Netflix's Stranger Things: Shawn Levy interview Netflix's Stranger Things: spotting the movie references

L. Frank Baum's The Wizard of Oz and its sequels have been adapted for the screen for nearly as long as there has been cinema. There's something about the tale of farmgirl Dorothy Gale being swept into the strange, magical, and sometimes scary land of Oz that has stuck in American popular consciousness and never let go.

Emerald City is the latest addition to the long on-screen Oz tradition, but, for all of the ways it draws from its obvious source material, it's strengths and weakness are defined by other pop »

Permalink | Report a problem


Emerald City TV Review – Oz Will Blow You Away All Over Again

3 January 2017 10:38 AM, PST | AreYouScreening.com | See recent AreYouScreening news »

Television reimaginings of classic tales have made for some wonderfully engaging entertainment (going back to Syfy efforts Tin Man and Alice, which were surprisingly fun) but Emerald City moves to a new level as Tarsem Singh returns to the form he hasn’t quite managed since The Fall.

The warning that should come on the tin is that audiences shouldn’t go into this expecting anything like a “retelling” of The Wizard of Oz. It would be nearly impossible to give a clear idea of what’s happened to L. Frank Baum’s works here, but it isn’t just modernized, but dipped in the grime of reality, and subjected to an absolutely unfettered imagination. It covers elements of the first three books (and perhaps beyond… it’s been a while), but is “inspired by” in the broadest sense. Some characters in this effort are an amalgamation of two characters in the books, »

- Marc Eastman

Permalink | Report a problem


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006

4 items from 2017


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners