"Lucky Louie"
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005

14 items from 2015


Lucky Louie, Ep. 1.11: “Louie Quits” laughs at Louie and Kim’s class

26 August 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Lucky Louie, Season 1, Episode 11: “Louie Quits”

Written by Dan Mintz

Directed by Andrew D. Weyman

Aired on August 20th, 2006 on HBO

Too often, Lucky Louie has come across as a great concept with poor execution. The idea of one of the funniest living comedians showing the contemporary relevance of a seemingly dated storytelling style by featuring modern language and topics of conversation is the sort of of thing which, hypothetically, I’d be very much on board with. Unfortunately, Louis C.K. too often forgets to update the attitudes associated with the form, leaving Lucky Louie often feeling like an ugly excuse to retread perspectives that television should’ve left behind long ago.

This is brought up as a way to discuss the cold open of “Louie Quits,” which has a promising start but eventually succumbs to the same problems which have been dragging down the series from the first episode. »

- Max Bledstein

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Lucky Louie, Ep. 1.10: “Confession” revels in juvenile absurdity

19 August 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Lucky Louie, Season 1, Episode 10: “Confession”

Written by Mary Fitzgerald and Aaron Shure

Directed by Andrew D. Weyman

Aired on August 13th, 2006 on HBO

Maybe Lucky Louie has just been searching for the right material for its jokes. Over the past few weeks, these reviews have derided the show for being racist, misogynistic, homophobic, and using subjects such as rape and alcoholism for comedic material. For too much of the season, Lucky Louie has come across as a way for a white man to crack jokes at the expense of those less fortunate than him. In Louie, Louis C.K. reveals an overwhelming amount of empathy, but his earlier series often feels burdened by his failure to understand anyone’s perspective other than his own.

“Confession” doesn’t find C.K. being any more empathetic, but it does show him aiming his humor in a more suitable (and funnier) direction. Rather »

- Max Bledstein

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Lucky Louie, Ep. 1.09: “Drinking” mocks addiction and rape

5 August 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Lucky Louie, Season 1, Episode 9: “Drinking”

Written by Kit Boss

Directed by Andrew D. Weyman

Aired on August 6th, 2006 on HBO

Welcome to the latest in the series of weekly complaints about offensive jokes in Louis C.K.’s oeuvre, or as Sound on Sight calls them, reviews of the first and only season of Lucky Louie. In all seriousness, just when it seems like the show’s humor can’t get any more tasteless, it finds subjects now (ten years after Lucky Louie premiered, but still) universally considered to be taboo to mock (and probably weren’t looked upon all that much better at the time). In last week’s “Get Out,” it was statutory rape, and this week’s “Drinking” pokes fun at, you guessed it, alcoholism. (It laughs at rape as well, but one gripe at a time.)

It’s too bad writer Kit Boss feels the need »

- Max Bledstein

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Lucky Louie, Ep. 1.08: “Get Out” bungles a statutory rape plot

29 July 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Lucky Louie, Season 1, Episode 8: “Get Out”

Written by Mike Royce

Directed by Andrew D. Weyman

Aired on July 31st, 2006 on HBO

Lucky Louie tackles some fairly dark subjects in its first season. Racism, misogyny, and homophobia are just a few topics the show uses as sources of humor (and which these reviews have called out for poorly handling). That being said, it’s at least had the decency to avoid rape, an issue which it was hard to imagine the series being any more deft at discussing. Avoided, that is, until this week’s “Get Out,” and the results are as uninspiring and potentially pernicious as Rich’s stale and offensive jokes throughout the season.

Before the episode gets to the rape plot, though, it starts off with a teaser which showcases yet another one of said jokes. In the scene, Rich wants free pizza, and he’s not »

- Max Bledstein

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Television that Home Video Forgot: Crossballs: The Debate Show (2004)

25 July 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Crossballs: The Debate Show

Showcase Inventory

Created by Matt Besser, Charlie Siskel

Produced by Charlie Siskel Productions

Aired on Comedy Central for 1 season (23 episodes, 1 unaired) from July 5, 2004 – August 27, 2004

Cast

Chris Tallman as Host/Moderator

Matt Besser as Various characters

Mary Birdsong as Various characters

Andrew Daly as Various characters

Jerry Minor as Various characters

Show Premise

“Out of the Crossfire, beyond Hardball, this is Crossballs!”

A parody of political debate shows, Crossballs has comedians pose as experts in their field to discuss the issue of the day and pits them against real life experts who are not aware of the farce debate they are participating in. The comedians argue both sides of an issue, be it ridiculous or not, and mine comedy from taking the issue to absurd lengths and goading reactions from the real experts.

Each episode is moderated by Chris Tallman (as a Chris Matthews type), who introduces »

- Jean Pierre Diez

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Lucky Louie, Ep. 1.07: “Discipline” effectively satirizes modern parenting

22 July 2015 2:29 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Lucky Louie, Season 1, Episode 7: “Discipline”

Written by Louis C.K.

Directed by Andrew D. Weyman

Aired on July 24th, 2006 on HBO

After all of the story arcs focusing on issues of gender, race, and sexuality, most of which haven’t been well handled, it’s refreshing to see Lucky Louie focus on an topic Louis C.K. understands better: parenting. While the attempts to tackle these other subjects have tended to reek of misplaced white male intentions, C.K. uses his experience as a parent to deliver a clever and touching take on parent-child power dynamics in the age of contemporary parenting techniques. This experience made for some of the best material in his stand-up work from the period (some of which is adapted directly into “Discipline”), and seeing it play out in the sitcom format makes it work even better.

Even with the improvement, “Discipline” isn’t entirely free from »

- Max Bledstein

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Lucky Louie, Ep. 1.06: “Flowers for Kim” makes the show’s style work

15 July 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Lucky Louie, Season 1, Episode 6: “Flowers for Kim”

Written by Jon Ross

Directed by Andrew D. Weyman

Aired on July 17th, 2006 on HBO

Throughout Lucky Louie’s prior episodes, the show has struggled to toe the line between using a dated style to express contemporary ideas and genuinely espousing a retrograde attitude. Although some moments, like Rich’s misogynistic jokes, have at least had the awareness not to directly align the viewer with the sentiments being conveyed, others, like the racist caricature in “A Mugging Story,” have seemed flat-out backwards. Louis C.K.’s conception for the show doesn’t seem inherently misguided, but the missteps of the early episodes have made the approach feel questionable.

It’s refreshing then, to see a half hour which finally works as C.K. intends. From the beginning of the cold open, writer Jon Ross puts the freedom from censorship allowed by HBO to good use, »

- Max Bledstein

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Lucky Louie, Ep. 1.05: “Control” hides funny gags inside a dull framework

8 July 2015 7:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Lucky Louie, Season 1, Episode 5: “Long Weekend

Written by Dino Stamatopoulos

Directed by Andrew D. Weyman

Aired on July 10th, 2006 on HBO

If nothing else, “Control” makes for a very focused episode of Lucky Louie. In a series crammed full of B plots and skits that feel forced in because Louis C.K. didn’t know where to put them (i.e. the “Why” sketch from the cold open in “Pilot”), it’s refreshing to see an episode which clearly develops a single idea. Whereas other half-hours have felt trapped between half-baked gags, there’s something enjoyable about seeing an episode which devotes its running time to exploring a specific concept and how it affects various members of the ensemble.

It’s too bad, though, that writer Dino Stamatopoulos doesn’t use the focus of the episode to examine a fresher topic. By looking at dieting, and specifically Louie’s desire »

- Max Bledstein

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Lucky Louie, Ep. 1.04: “Long Weekend” is built on a contrived premise

1 July 2015 7:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Lucky Louie, Season 1, Episode 4: “Long Weekend

Written by Louis C.K.

Directed by Andrew D. Weyman

Aired on July 3rd, 2006 on HBO

Throughout Louis C.K.’s career, although he often bears a strong resemblance to the characters he plays (including in his stand-up persona), he almost never seems to intend for the audience to wholly identify with them. Outside of his self-righteous late-night rants, as heavily as C.K. plays his regular guy shtick (particularly when he positions himself as the relatable foil to an off-the-rails sad sack, such as in “Cop Story” from the most recent season of Louie), there’s almost always something to keep the viewer from unambiguously rooting for him.

Sometimes that “something” is quite a bit more pronounced, like in “Long Weekend.” Although there are often conceivable loopholes for those who wish to defend C.K.’s characters, there’s not much of a possible »

- Max Bledstein

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Lucky Louie, Ep. 1.03: “A Mugging Story” lazily deals with race

24 June 2015 9:36 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Lucky Louie, Season 1, Episode 3: “A Mugging Story”

Written by Patricia Breen

Directed by Andrew D. Weyman

Aired on June 18, 2006 on HBO

From the beginning of Lucky Louie, the main impetus behind the project has always seemed to be to address issues which its stylistic progenitors couldn’t discuss. In the first two episodes, that meant issues of female sexual desire and pregnancy. As prior reviews have discussed, Louis C.K.’s results in these episodes were mixed, as he often teetered between laughing at the atavistic views of his male characters and endorsing them. The same inconsistency continues in “A Mugging Story,” but on a different subject: racism.

Before that though, the episode kicks off with a humorous cold open in which Louie plays a failed game of hide and seek with Lucy. The scene serves to illustrate Kim’s parenting superiority over Louie, as her willingness to play along »

- Max Bledstein

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Lucky Louie, Ep. 1.02: “Kim’s O” shows us sex from Kim’s perspective

17 June 2015 7:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Lucky Louie, Season 1, Episode 2: “Kim’s O”

Written by Dan Mintz & Aaron Shure

Directed by Andrew D. Weyman

Aired on June 18, 2006 on HBO

Two episodes in, sexual politics have been a clear theme of Lucky Louie, and “Kim’s O” plays no small part in that. Like last week’s “Pilot,” the episode centers on the dysfunctional sexual relationship between Louie and Kim, and how it burdens their entire lives. But whereas “Pilot” suffered for being too focused on the boorishness of Louie and his friends (even if it mocked their perspective), “Kim’s O” succeeds by making her unhappiness the episode’s focal point, rather than depicting her as unfortunate (but comical) collateral damage.

It’s not like “Kim’s O” completely leaves the boorishness aside, although it’s used more sparingly and effectively here. It begins in the teaser, with Louie and Kim laughing at the loud, »

- Max Bledstein

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Lucky Louie, Ep. 1.01: “Pilot” misses the mark, but still gets laughs

10 June 2015 8:59 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Lucky Louie, Season 1, Episode 1: “Pilot”

Written by Louis C.K.

Directed by Gary Halvorson

Aired on June 11, 2006 on HBO

Louis C.K.’s current series, Louie, is unlike anything on T.V. The show’s cinematic style, unpredictability, and the way it remains difficult to define make it a unique outlier in the T.V. landscape, even in a world with shows as idiosyncratic as Transparent and Girls. In that context, the first series he created, Lucky Louie, almost seems like the work of a different writer: it’s presented in the style of classic sitcoms like The Honeymooners, and its multi-cam set-up was filmed in front of a live audience.

Despite its traditional appearance, Lucky Louie tackles topics and uses language which would be unthinkable in the shows it’s inspired by, which can be seen through much of its first episode. It starts with the “Why?” gag of the cold open, »

- Max Bledstein

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How ‘Louie’ got a shorter season because Louis C.K. got high

28 May 2015 9:44 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

The network TV season ended last week, which means we're diving deep into Emmy campaigning season. The official Emmy ballot gets sent to TV Academy members in early June, and in the meantime, networks and studios are doing their best to put on good faces for potential voters, sometimes with elaborate screener packages, sometimes with For Your Consideration panels featuring the creators and stars of their shows. Last week, I moderated one of those for "Transparent," and last night, I got to do the same for "Louie," sitting down for a conversation with Louis C.K. and Pamela Adlon after the audience got to watch this season's "Bobby's House" and the nightmare-fueled "Untitled." While some of these panels are recorded and later made available to the public (I believe that's the plan with the "Transparent" one), FX didn't film this. But it was memorable enough — particularly since C.K. doesn't do »

- Alan Sepinwall

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Emma Stone's 10 Best Performances, Ranked

21 February 2015 1:00 AM, PST | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

It.s hard to imagine a time before Emma Stone existed in film. But, before 2007, the actress had barely touched any segment of the entertainment industry. After her first appearance on TV as a 16-year-old on In Search of the Partridge Family, Stone then went on to make appearances in a few shows including one particularly angsty role in Lucky Louie and then in 2007 she took the big screen as Jules in Superbad and the magic began. Now, the 26-year-old actress has shown off her chops in an array of genres, and is currently up for her first Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress in the film, Birdman. In less than eight years, Stone went from quirky teen playing a minor role in a comedy blockbuster to critically-acclaimed actress, with award nominations and even a run on Broadway as the leading role in Cabaret. Her career may only just »

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005

14 items from 2015


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