Director James Spione's passionate portrait of his extended family is an intimate revelation of the inner workings of the American family farm. Unlike previous documentaries on the subject,... See full summary »

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Director James Spione's passionate portrait of his extended family is an intimate revelation of the inner workings of the American family farm. Unlike previous documentaries on the subject, Spione examines the impending demise of the farm where his Mom grew up as the result not of economic trends or political pressures, but rather, the increasingly strained intergenerational dynamics between family members. With extraordinary plain-spoken candor, the Ames family reveals how callous parenting and diverging religious views may have led an entire generation to turn away from the family tradition. On the other hand, the film makes abundantly clear that the work itself is still a back-breaking grind, a difficult path for even the hardiest farmer's son to follow, even in the era of air-conditioned tractor cabs. A powerful evocation of a vanishing way of life, and a moving tribute to the rare character it takes to persevere on a small American farm. Written by Anonymous

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19 February 2005 (USA)  »

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Solid work on an important and complex problem - family farms
28 April 2006 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

David Hovland writes: This is a solid presentation, with interviews and well-chosen images, of the problem of the decline of family farms in the United States.

The father of the family has worked on his dairy farm in upstate New York for most of his life. The problem now is that his children have gone into occupations other than farming, so there is no direct and convenient way to transfer the operation to the next generation.

The son who made the film was at a showing I attended. I signed on to receive e-mails concerning more showings, and have thus been informed of many more showings to extend the impact of the documentary. This is praiseworthy -- a new film director with a real message and commitment should be encouraged.


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