All We Are Saying is a personal look at what makes musicians tick -- a look into the psyches of some of the top musical artists of the day. Through a series of intimate conversations, over ... See full summary »

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All We Are Saying is a personal look at what makes musicians tick -- a look into the psyches of some of the top musical artists of the day. Through a series of intimate conversations, over fifty musical legends, hot new artists and music industry insiders reveal what inspires them, their personal struggles of balancing relationships and family while working on the road and the state of the music business in the 21st Century. Presented as an ongoing, casual conversation, the film offers artists' candid and personal thoughts. Written by The Road, LLC

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8 March 2006 (USA)  »

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Snake Knife Drown
Written by John Kimler
Performed by Tony Lunn, Michael Kinkade, Berman, and Chandra Watson
Courtesy of Flying Tiger Records and NovaTunes
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Sad
14 March 2006 | by (Utah) – See all my reviews

Hearing these musicians and singers speak, reminded me of a recurring scene from "Beavis and Butthead." Whenever Beavis or Butthead would deeply think, an image came up on the screen of a mostly burned out light bulb with a half dead fly buzzing around inside it.

The old rock stars reminded me of dried up tumbleweeds which blow around in the desert on windy days. They spoke of how commercialized the music business is now. They lamented the fact that now it's looks, not talent which make a singer famous. Old rich complainers, jealous of the younger generation of musicians. David Crosby who looks like he's been dead for ten years was especially pathetic. A big empty head with gibberish coming out of it. Patty Smith now looks like a man, mustache and all. She looks like Tom Petty's twin brother without the blonde dye job.

The younger musicians are no better. The guy from "Andre 3000" talked of how he is truly a misunderstood introvert, as he spoke wearing his bright read pants, blue, plaid shirt, Mr. T stater kit jewelry and big puffy hat. Gwen Stefani spoke of the pain no one could understand, the day her assistant was off work and she (gasp)locked herself out of her house.

It's often disappointing to hear public figures speaking their private thoughts, this movie was no exception. It was a portrait of out of touch, insulated, childish, self absorbed dumb people speaking of their rich, pampered and dumb lives. It was particularly annoying to hear these singers and guitar strummers constantly calling themselves "artists." Please! If you enjoy the music of any of these "artists" listed in the credits for this movie, you may want to skip it.

Kudos to Rosanna Arquette though. Every time the camera was panned to her she looked like she was actually enjoying hearing these "artists" speak. That's good acting.


10 of 33 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

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