Qing hong (2005) - News Poster

(2005)

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Cannes Completes Competitive Slate

Cannes Completes Competitive Slate
By Steve Pond 

The Cannes Film Festival has added the final two films to its 2010 competitive slate, choosing the Chinese drama "Chongqing Blues" and the Hungarian "Tender Son - the Frankenstein Project" to complete its 18-film lineup.

The former film was made by director Wang Xiaoshuai, a Cannes 2005 jury winner for "Qing Hong" ("Shanghai Dreams"); the latter by Kornel Mondruczo, who won the Fipresci prize at the festival for "Delta" in 2008.

The first 16 films screening in competition were announced on April 15.

Two films were added...
See full article at The Wrap »

ARP takes French rights to 'Eye'

ARP takes French rights to 'Eye'
HONG KONG -- French film distributor ARP Selection bought all French-speaking rights to Eye in the Sky, the Hong Kong International Film Festival opener by first-time director Yau Nai Hoi, from Fortissimo Films.

The deal for the Sundream Motion Pictures title, concluded late Tuesday at the Festival's parallel Hong Kong Filmart, was signed by Fortissimo's co-chairman Wouter Barendrecht and ARP's Michele Halberstadt.

Financial details were not disclosed.

Halberstadt said ARP was "blown away" by Eye. "It's a fast-paced and intense thriller, wonderfully acted, beautifully framed, which manages to capture the hectic pulse of Hong Kong," Halberstadt said.

Fortissimo's Barendrecht said "ARP's passion for Asian cinema is intense," adding that he was "delighted" to have worked with ARP on Chinese director Wang Xiaoshuai's Shanghai Dreams (2005).

"Eye" director Yau also is a writer whose script for Hong Kong director Johnnie To's Election won him the Taiwan Golden Horse award for best screenplay in 2005. He also won two screenwriting prizes at the Hong Kong Film Awards.

"Eye" premiered to critical acclaim at the Berlin International Film Festival in February.

China participation highlights Kolkata fest

China participation highlights Kolkata fest
NEW DELHI -- The week-long Kolkata Film Festival, India's only non-competitive festival, ended Friday with a screening of Kaalpurush by renowned Indian director Buddhadeb Dasgupta.

Now in its 12th year, a highlight of this year's festival was the first-ever participation from China, which saw four contemporary films screened including a Sunday premiere Sunday for 7 Colours, a collection of seven short films. One the film's seven directors, Lu Yitong, and actress Yang Qing were in attendance.

The Chinese flavor at the festival comes just a week before the official visit of Chinese President Hu Jintao to India.

Other Chinese films unspooling included Yang Li's noirish 2003 title Blind Shaft; 2005 Cannes Jury Prize winner Shanghai Dreams, directed by Xiaoshuai Wang; and 2005's Perpetual Motion, by director Ning Ying.

The festival, which opened with Danish filmmaker Andres Thomas Jensen's Adam's Apples, showcased 225 films, compared with 149 last year, from 53 countries, including a special showcase of eight films by Ingmar Bergman.

Also included were retrospectives of Italian filmmakers Luchino Visconti and Roberto Rossellini, whose birth centenaries are being observed this year.

'Shanghai' wins best feature at first Eurasia fest

'Shanghai' wins best feature at first Eurasia fest
ANTALYA, TURKEY -- Chinese and Russian directors took top honors at Turkey's first International Eurasia Film Festival in Turkish Mediterranean resort Antalya at a closing ceremony Saturday night hosted in a famed Roman amphitheatre. Chinese director Wang Xiaoshuai beat a field of 11 European and Asian movies to win best feature - and a $75,000 check - for Shanghai Dreams (Qing Hong), already a jury prize winner at Cannes this year. Eurasia festival jury president, British director John Irving, called the film, "a masterful account of life in a distant community recounting the pain of exile, and yearning for a better life."

Cannes winners top N.Z. fests

Cannes winners top N.Z. fests
WELLINGTON, New Zealand -- The Telecom Auckland 37th International Film Festival kicks off Friday with five top-prize winners from this year's Festival de Cannes highlighting a two-week showcase of 150-plus titles. The festival, led by director Bill Gosden, includes offshoot sister fests in 15 other New Zealand cities. The festivals will hold the first screenings outside of Europe for Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne's The Child, which won the Palme D'Or; Jim Jarmusch's Broken Flowers (Grand Prix); Michael Haneke's Hidden (best director); Miranda July's Me, You and Everyone We Know (best film by a new director); and Wang Xiaoshuai's Shanghai Dreams (Jury Prize).

Palme adopts 'Child'; Jones, Haneke lauded

CANNES -- Tommy Lee Jones was named best actor at the Festival de Cannes on Saturday night having directed himself in his theatrical feature debut, The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, which also won the screenplay award. The festival's top prize, the Palme d'Or, went to The Child (L'enfant), by Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne, with Focus Features' Broken Flowers, directed by Jim Jarmusch and starring Bill Murray, taking the second-place Grand Prize. Austrian Michael Haneke won best director honors for his highly praised Hidden (Cache), starring Juliette Binoche and Daniel Auteuil, and Shanghai Dreams, from Chinese director Wang Xiaoshuai, won the Jury Prize. Hanna Laslo was named best actress for the Israeli film Free Zone. The prizes were handed out on the last night of the 58th Cannes festival at a gala ceremony that preceded the screening of the closing Out of Competition film Chromophobia, directed by Martha Fiennes.

Belgian Film Takes Palme D'Or

Belgian movie L'Enfant beat 20 other films to win the coveted Palme D'Or at the Cannes Film Festival in France on Saturday. L'Enfant, which has the English title of The Child, was directed by brothers Luc Dardenne and Jean-Pierre Dardenne and follows a young couple struggling to survive in France's urban jungle. This year's festival marked the second time the Dardenne brothers have picked up the prestigious Palme D'Or - they previously won it in 1999 for Rosetta. Elsewhere, Tommy Lee Jones won the Best Actor award for his role as Pete Perkins in western The Three Burials Of Melquiades Estrada, which he also directed. Jones' film also won Best Screenplay for its writer Guillermo Arriaga. Israeli Hanna Laslo picked up the Best Actress prize for her role in Free Zone, about a borderless Middle East. She dedicated her award to her mother, who died in the Holocaust. American director Jim Jarmusch won the Grand Prix award for his film Broken Flowers, which stars Bill Murray, Sharon Stone and Jessica Lange. Chinese filmmaker Wang Xiaoshuai won the Special Jury Prize for Shanghai Dreams. Michael Haneke won the Best Director award for French film Hidden, while Best Short Film went to Wayfarers by Ukraine moviemaker Igor Strembitskyy.

Palme adopts 'Child'; Jones, Haneke lauded

Palme adopts 'Child'; Jones, Haneke lauded
CANNES -- Tommy Lee Jones was named best actor at the Festival de Cannes on Saturday night having directed himself in his theatrical feature debut, The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, which also won the screenplay award. The festival's top prize, the Palme d'Or, went to The Child (L'enfant), by Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne, with Focus Features' Broken Flowers, directed by Jim Jarmusch and starring Bill Murray, taking the second-place Grand Prize. Austrian Michael Haneke won best director honors for his highly praised Hidden (Cache), starring Juliette Binoche and Daniel Auteuil, and Shanghai Dreams, from Chinese director Wang Xiaoshuai, won the Jury Prize. Hanna Laslo was named best actress for the Israeli film Free Zone. The prizes were handed out on the last night of the 58th Cannes festival at a gala ceremony that preceded the screening of the closing Out of Competition film Chromophobia, directed by Martha Fiennes.

Palme adopts 'Child'; Jones, Haneke lauded

Palme adopts 'Child'; Jones, Haneke lauded
CANNES -- Tommy Lee Jones was named best actor at the Festival de Cannes on Saturday night having directed himself in his theatrical feature debut, The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, which also won the screenplay award. The festival's top prize, the Palme d'Or, went to The Child (L'enfant), by Belgian brothers Jean-Pierre Dardenne and Luc Dardenne, with Focus Features' Broken Flowers, directed by Jim Jarmusch and starring Bill Murray, taking the second-place Grand Prize. Austrian Michael Haneke won best director honors for his highly praised Hidden (Cache), starring Juliette Binoche and Daniel Auteuil, and Shanghai Dreams, from Chinese director Wang Xiaoshuai, won the Jury Prize. Hanna Laslo was named best actress for the Israeli film Free Zone. The prizes were handed out on the last night of the 58th Cannes festival at a gala ceremony that preceded the screening of the closing Out of Competition film Chromophobia, directed by Martha Fiennes.

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