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42 (2013)

PG-13 | | Biography, Drama, Sport | 12 April 2013 (USA)
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This movie is about Jackie Robinson and his journey to becoming a Brooklyn Dodger and his life during that time.

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3 wins & 18 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

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Wendell Smith (as Andre Holland)
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Storyline

In 1946, Jackie Robinson is a Negro League baseball player who never takes racism lying down. Branch Rickey is a Major League team executive with a bold idea. To that end, Rickey recruits Robinson to break the unspoken color line as the first modern African American Major League player. As both anticipate, this proves a major challenge for Robinson and his family as they endure unrelenting racist hostility on and off the field, from player and fan alike. As Jackie struggles against his nature to endure such abuse without complaint, he finds allies and hope where he least expects it. Written by Kenneth Chisholm (kchishol@rogers.com)

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In a game divided by color, he made us see greatness.

Genres:

Biography | Drama | Sport

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for thematic elements including language | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

12 April 2013 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

42: The Jackie Robinson Story  »

Box Office

Budget:

$40,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$27,487,144 (USA) (12 April 2013)

Gross:

$95,001,343 (USA) (19 July 2013)
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2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Kelley Jakle: babysitter is played by the great-granddaughter of Branch Rickey, general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers. See more »

Goofs

In real life, Fritz Ostermueller was almost 40 years old when Jackie Robinson debuted in the National League. See more »

Quotes

Branch Rickey: It's another opening day, Harold. All future, no past.
Harold Parrott: It's a blank page, sir.
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Connections

Referenced in Midnight Screenings: 42/Scary Movie 5 (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

The Sidewalks Of New York
Written by Charles Lawlor and James Blake
Performed by Ed Alstrom
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User Reviews

A Number on the Back
13 April 2013 | by (Dallas, Texas) – See all my reviews

Greetings again from the darkness. After some soul searching, I have decided to turn off the critical side of my brain and concentrate on what is good about this movie. As a baseball and movie fanatic, a bit of trepidation creeps in when the two come together. However, this really isn't a baseball movie, though the story focuses on what may be the most critical turning point in baseball history. In fact, this turning point was much bigger than the American Pasttime ... it was also key to the Civil Rights Movement. The movie is a reminder of how different things could have been with the wrong man rather than the right one ... Jackie Robinson.

Writer/Director Brian Helgeland (s/p for L.A. Confidential and Mystic River) takes a look at what occurred in 1945-47, when Brooklyn Dodgers President and GM Branch Rickey (played by Harrison Ford) made the business decision to integrate baseball. We see his selection process ... Roy Campanella "too nice", Satchel Paige "too old". He settles on Jackie Robinson after their infamous 3 hour meetings where Rickey confronts Robinson with his need for a black player "with the guts NOT to fight back".

Chadwick Boseman portrays Jackie Robinson as a man thoroughly in love with his wife Rachel (played by Nicole Beharie), and one who says he just wants to "be a ballplayer", while at the same time taking pride in his world-changing role. We see his evolution from his stint as shortstop for the Kansas City Monarchs of Negro Leagues to his time with the Dodgers' AAA minor league team in Montreal and finally to his introduction to the Major Leagues in 1947.

This is an earnest and sincere movie that removes the complexities of the times and the main characters. Much of it is portrayed as good guys versus bad guys. The good guys are really good and the bad guys are really bad. Alan Tudyk has the unenviable task of portraying Philadelphia Phillies manager Ben Chapman, who famously unleashed a verbal assault of vile racism on Robinson. Mr. Rickey credited Chapman's small-mindedness as the single biggest factor in unifying the Dodger team around Robinson. The other famous moment given time in the movie is when beloved shortstop Pee Wee Reese (Lucas Black) put his arm around Robinson, shushing the Cincinnati fans. Of course as a baseball fan, I enjoyed the all too brief antics of Brooklyn manager Leo Durocher (Christopher Meloni) whose place in the Robinson story would have been much more profound had he not succumbed to the weakness of the flesh (so to speak).

Filmmaker Helgeland provides a tale of morality and social change, and provides a glimpse at the character and strength required by those involved. The story has much more to do with demonstrating how the times began to change than it does with how Jackie Robinson, an unpolished ballplayer but superior athlete, transformed himself into a perennial all-star and league MVP. And that's as it should be. As Rickey stated, acceptance will only occur if the world is convinced Robinson is a fine gentleman and a great baseball player. That burden must have weighed heavily at times, but it's very clear that Robinson was the right man at the right time.


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