In March of 1990, two thieves dressed as Boston police officers gained entrance to the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum in Boston Massachusetts and successfully executed the largest art ... See full summary »

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In March of 1990, two thieves dressed as Boston police officers gained entrance to the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum in Boston Massachusetts and successfully executed the largest art heist in modern history. Among the thirteen priceless works stolen was Vermeer's "The Concert" one of only 35 of the masters surviving works. Not a single one of the works has been recovered. STOLEN is a full exploration of the Gardner theft, and the fascinating, disparate characters involved: from the 19th century Grand dame Isabella Gardner to a private detective obsessed with finding the art to a terrorist organization with a penchant for stealing Vermeers. Written by Anonymous

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Documentary

Certificate:

Unrated
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Release Date:

20 March 2007 (USA)  »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$6,250 (USA) (21 April 2006)

Gross:

$289,773 (USA) (21 September 2012)
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Connections

Edited from Stolen (2005) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Enjoyable and Insightful
7 September 2006 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I found this movie to be interesting and thoughtful, skillfully combining investigative reporting with art criticism and human interest. It was atmospheric and, perhaps most successfully of all, captured something of the allure that draws us to works of art and that then makes some people steal them--the latter a sort of perverse commentary on the intangible something about great art that makes us value it so highly.

By concentrating on the fascination that all the characters in the movie had with these paintings, the movie thus, for me, extended itself beyond the requirements of who stole the goods and how they did it (the theme, after all, of many tedious heist movies) and became an extended meditation on what it means to possess and be possessed by an image. Looked at this way, the movie grows in the imagination long after one or many viewings, and deepens very satisfyingly. Highly recommended.


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