6.2/10
84,810
315 user 220 critic

Vacancy (2007)

A married couple becomes stranded at an isolated motel and finds hidden video cameras in their room. They soon realize that unless they escape, they'll be the next victims of a snuff film.

Director:

Writer:

Reviews
Popularity
4,693 ( 738)

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
1 nomination. See more awards »
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Horror | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5/10 X  

Three young people check into the Meadow View Inn for a night's rest, fully unaware of the inn's sick-minded employees and their nefarious intentions.

Director: Eric Bross
Stars: Agnes Bruckner, David Moscow, Scott Anderson
The Strangers (2008)
Horror | Mystery | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.2/10 X  

A young couple staying in an isolated vacation home are terrorized by three unknown assailants.

Director: Bryan Bertino
Stars: Scott Speedman, Liv Tyler, Gemma Ward
Horror | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

After kidnapping and brutally assaulting two young women, a gang unknowingly finds refuge at a vacation home belonging to the parents of one of the victims: a mother and father who devise an increasingly gruesome series of revenge tactics.

Director: Dennis Iliadis
Stars: Garret Dillahunt, Monica Potter, Tony Goldwyn
Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

A suburban American family is being stalked by a group of psychotic people who live in the desert, far away from civilization.

Director: Alexandre Aja
Stars: Ted Levine, Kathleen Quinlan, Dan Byrd
The Collector I (2009)
Horror | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.4/10 X  

Desperate to repay his debt to his ex-wife, an ex-con plots a heist at his new employer's country home, unaware that a second criminal has also targeted the property, and rigged it with a series of deadly traps.

Director: Marcus Dunstan
Stars: Josh Stewart, Andrea Roth, Juan Fernández
You're Next (2011)
Horror | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

When the Davison family comes under attack during their wedding anniversary getaway, the gang of mysterious killers soon learns that one of the victims harbors a secret talent for fighting back.

Director: Adam Wingard
Stars: Sharni Vinson, Joe Swanberg, AJ Bowen
Wrong Turn I (2003)
Horror
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.1/10 X  

Six people find themselves trapped in the woods of West Virginia, hunted down by "cannibalistic mountain men grossly disfigured through generations of in-breeding."

Director: Rob Schmidt
Stars: Eliza Dushku, Jeremy Sisto, Emmanuelle Chriqui
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
...
...
Killer (as Scott G. Anderson)
Mark Casella ...
Truck Driver (as Mark Cassella)
David Doty ...
Highway Patrol
Norm Compton ...
Snuff Victim
...
Snuff Victim
...
Snuff Victim (as Meegan E. Godfrey)
...
Snuff Victim
...
Steven R
...
Brenda B (as Dale Waddington Horowitz)
Ernest Misko ...
Snuff Victim (as Ernie Misko)
Bryan Ross ...
Snuff Victim
Edit

Storyline

David and Amy Fox find themselves stranded in the middle of nowhere when their car breaks down. Luckily, they come across a motel with a TV to entertain them during their overnight stay. However, there's something very strange and familiar about the Grade-Z slasher movies that the motel broadcasts for its guests' enjoyment. They all appear to be filmed in the very same room they occupy! Realizing that they are trapped in their room with hidden cameras now aimed at them filming their every move, David and Amy desperately find a means of escape through locked doors, crawlspaces and underground tunnels before they too become the newest stars of the mystery filmmaker's next cult classic! Written by alfiehitchie

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Once you've checked in... The terror begins. See more »

Genres:

Horror | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for brutal violence and terror, brief nudity and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

20 April 2007 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Hotel sin salida  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$19,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$7,603,376, 22 April 2007, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$19,363,565

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$35,300,645
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| |

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Writer Mark L. Smith stated that he used to live in Colorado with his wife and they would frequently drive down to New Mexico. During these drives, they would see all these isolated motels in the middle of nowhere that never seemed to have any customers. Smith started to wonder how these empty motels stayed in business, and that is how he came up with the idea of an isolated motel that was actually a front for selling snuff films of its traveling guests. Smith also mentioned that New Mexico was the original setting for the film, however, this was not made apparent in the film, as the location of the Pinewood Motel is never exactly specified. It is still entirely possible that the Pinewood is located in New Mexico as it is mentioned that David and Amy live in California. The Pinewood could also be located near the Sierra Nevadas in California or Nevada since it is mentioned to be "by the mountains" and David and Amy are apparently on the last leg of their trip. The film's prequel, Vacancy 2: The First Cut; also written by Smith, is mentioned to take place in North Carolina, however it is never specified whether or not the motel in the film is the Pinewood. North Carolina is also home to the Appalachian Mountains, which would fit the description of "by the mountains". See more »

Goofs

When Amy and David climb out of the 'secret' door and into the little store, David places the cover back over the door and we see that the handle on the door's cover is closest to the table with the cash register, however when David knocks that table over and the camera pans back to the 'secret' door the handle is moved to the opposite side. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
David Fox: [after swerving while driving] Son of a bitch!
Amy Fox: What are you doing?
David Fox: It was a goddamn raccoon in the middle of the road!
Amy Fox: Well, better to kill us than get a little roadkill on the car, huh?
David Fox: Well, we're still alive. I can tell by the pissy look that you're giving me.
See more »

Connections

References Psycho (1960) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Worth Checking In
18 June 2007 | by See all my reviews

Vacancy has Alfred Hitchcock's finger prints smeared all over it, in fact at several times, especially the quite nifty looking opening credits, seems a lot like a homage to the great horror maestro himself. Its true, that even many years after Hitchcok finished making movies, that his movie still stay in memory for longer than most of the recent Hollywood horror that has arrived. The Birds and Psycho are far more memorable than the House of Wax remake or The Reaping. Hitchcock's movies worked because he had great characterisation and also a great sense of atmosphere, you could sit and watch a Hitchcock movie and be terrified for half an hour before anything scary actually happens. The sense of foreboding and incredibly skilfully done atmosphere did that to an audience. Nowadays we get cheap jump out of your seat scares and torture scenes designed to sicken. Initially my thoughts towards seeing Vacancy were not great, the trailer looked alright, but my guess was it would just be another lame, modern slasher flick. So what a great surprise to say that Vacancy is a good little movie that actually has some genuine scares in it. The movie isn't gory, nor is it jumpy, the movie is unsettling and creepy. Now this is what a true horror movie should do in my eyes, if a movie can unsettle without resorting to jump scares then it is a success. Vacncay pulls this off, well it pulls this off for a majority of the time. The movie is an absolute success until the ending, at the ending it seems to flounder a bit and leaves a bitter taste in the mouth. But everything up until the ending is a joy to watch.

What surprised me most about Vacancy has to be the actual acting. When I saw the trailer and saw that Kate Beckinsale and Luke Wilson were the leading couple I nearly burst out laughing. For starters Luke Wilson is a comedy man, he's designed to make funny movies. Well when I say funny movies I mean if he has the right material as just recently I've found him as unfunny as can be. Kate Beckinsale just doesn't seem the type to be in a horror movie. But its this bizarre casting that pays off so well. Luke Wilson really proves himself in this movie, to the extent I want him to focus more on a serious acting career, he seems to be more at home here than he has in years with his comedy movies. Kate Beckinsale also proves herself admirably. The pair are believable, and you actually start to care for them. Wishing that they will escape the nightmare, hoping that they find a way out. Their performances are so much different from the usual stupid teenagers we see in horror movies today, its refreshing to see adults in this horrific situation. The villains of the movie are also quite menacing for the majority of the time, the hotel manager played by Frank Whaley is a good character. He's not on screen too often, but he does play a creepy little man very well.

So what of the scares then? Well as I've said the movie is at times pretty scary. Not for the first twenty minutes mind you, that is dedicated for set up and too increase the atmosphere. Those scenes work very well and once again its refreshing to see genuine character development in a horror movie, made better by the fact the two leads are great. However, the minute the couple enter the hotel room the focus shifts. Bangings on the wall and doors begin, the phone rings with nobody on the other end. From that point onwards the movie gets terrifying, the bangings on the wall really starts to creep you out at one point. Once the big bad secret about the motel is discovered, after watching some tapes, and the lights suddenly go out. The movie succeeds in terrifying. After the lights go out I guarantee you will be sitting on the edge of your seats. The movie does a couple of jump scares here and there, but it focuses mainly on the unseen terror. The minute the bangings stopped you aren't relieved, you're even more terrified because then you don't know what the people are up to. Its this sense of terror that makes the movie worthy of a recommendation. Its nice to see a horror movie try scaring and unsettling the audience once in a while. Its nothing a hardcore horror fan can't handle, but it definitely will unsettle the general population of people.

As I've said the movie isn't perfect. The ending being the major setback of the movie. After the brilliant set up, and the scary middle section, the ending seems to run out of steam. In fact it seemed like the writers wasn't sure what to do anymore and did a few obvious things and quickly ended the movie. It feels rushes and unlike the rest of the movie, unskillfully made. Its the ending that fails in making this a complete homage to Hitchcock, Hitchcock could deliver an ending, this movie doesn't really get an ending. The ending is enough to leave you satisfied, but in a movie that exceeds all expectations you expect more from the ending.

Vacancy is a good old fashioned horror/thriller. Its only let down by its pretty disappointing ending. The run time is pretty short, making the experience short and sharp enough to pack a real punch. Its really worth checking out just for the brilliant set up and middle section. But the ending really does make the movie suffer a little bit. Still this is definitely a good horror movie, and more horror movies made in this style would be a welcome relief.


95 of 137 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?
Review this title | See all 315 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

'Star Wars' Creatures We Love

"The IMDb Show" breaks down the origins of some iconic Star Wars creatures. Plus, legendary sword choreographer Tim Weske explains the basics of lightsaber combat.

Watch now