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The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause (2006) Poster

Trivia

Peter Boyle played Mr. Whittle, Scott Calvin's supervisor in the first movie, then was recast as Father Time in the latter movies.
Jack Frost is seen wearing a black and white outfit with a pale and white look, referring to Jack Skellington from the The Nightmare Before Christmas (1993), another character who believed that he could take over for Santa Claus. In the trailer, the tracks "What's This" and "Making Christmas" from that film are heard in the background.
This is the only "Santa Clause" movie where Santa's head elf Bernard doesn't make an appearance. This leaves the returning character Curtis the new head elf.
When Santa and Lucy are visiting Santa's hall of snow globes for the first time, you can see (on the right side of the frame just when they are leaving) the head of director Michael Lembeck in one of the flying snow globes.
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Spencer Breslin's sister Abigail Breslin appears as Trish, one of the elf students in Mrs. Clause's class.
The scrolling ticker sign in the toy factory reads "378 Years without an accident".
Despite Bernard's non-appearance in the film, the novelization uses his character.
The movie wasn't released on DVD until a year after it pulled from theaters.
The answer to Mrs./Teacher Claus's math question is 3 hours; an object moving in one direction at 20mph would take 3 hours to travel 60 miles, and another object moving in the opposite direction at 50mph would take three hours to travel 150 miles. 60+150=210.
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This is Martin Short and Tim Allen's second time in a film together they starred in Disney 's Jungle 2 Jungle together in 1997
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The "Red Deer" energy drink vending machines are not only a Santa-related parody on the well-known soft drink brand, but they also are a tongue-in-cheek reference to Rudolph's red nose. During the first part of the movie, the North Pole is disguised as "Canada". There is a city called Red Deer on Alberta, Canada.
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The "parodied words" to Jack Frost's "final number" in the film:

Start spreading the news, by jet or by sleigh You wanna be a part of it, North Pole, North Pole You snooze and you lose, so come here to play Here at the very heart of it, North Pole North Pole Come see the snowman, up where no man's without a treat And watch this king of the chill --- HA! --- turn up the heat Those summertime blues are melting away Although it's 55 below at Polar North You'll zip your parka tight Sugar plum trees late at night It's all for you, North Pole, North Pole. Start spreading the news, by jet or by sleigh You wanna be a part of it, North Pole, North Pole You snooze and you lose, so come here to play Here at the very heart of it, North Pole, North Pole You'll wanna wake up in the resort that never sleeps And watch this king of the chill, inventive control, doing his thing at the top of the pole Those summertime blues are melting away Although it's 55 below at Polar North If you can make it here, the world's all Christmas cheer Holiday gold, North Pole, North Pole.
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Jack Frost's discovery of the closet filled with cans of beans is a triple joke: (1) The closet is "full of beans", just like Santa is, (2) Santa's being "full of beans" from eating so many cans of them is a reference to the common saying, "That jolly old guy is still full of beans" (still peppy and lively, just as Santa Clause is in this movie), and (3) The "full of beans" saying fits perfectly with Comet's "lively" flatulence problem.
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Jack Frost's musical number "North Pole, North Pole" is a parody of Frank Sinatra's "New York, New York"
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See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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