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Lady in the Water (2006) Poster

Trivia

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M. Night Shyamalan, delighted after he discovered unknown Cindy Cheung, was shocked to hear that her agent demanded 1 million dollars for her role in the film. Night was prepared to pay the SAG minimum, $65,000. They settled at $100,000.
'M Night Shyamalan' adapted Lady in the Water (2006), originally a bedtime story, into an actual children's book. It was released on the same day as the film.
The plot of the movie is based on a bedtime story M. Night Shyamalan wrote for his kids.
Kevin Costner was considered for the role of Heep. However, Paul Giamatti accepted the part before they contacted Costner (Giamatti was really the first option).
According to the book The Man Who Heard Voices, or How M. Night Shyamalan Risked His Career on a Fairy Tale, one of the reasons why Shyamalan decided to part with Disney was because Disney's president of development, Nina Jacobson took her son to a party instead of staying home to read the script for "Lady in the Water." Shyamalan had it personally couriered to her, and to add insult to injury, she didn't like it anyway. Shyamalan went off in a huff, and the "creative differences" he purportedly had with Disney was that he simply felt there was nothing creative about Disney anymore. He took the script to Warner Brothers instead, but without the usual marketing campaign that Disney promoted his other films with, "Lady in the Water" was a box-office flop.
M. Night Shyamalan was in talks with Philip Seymour Hoffman for an unspecified role. Hoffman, despite the fact that he "loved the script, liked the role" had scheduling conflicts.
The reason for the film's shockingly high budget despite being set in one location is because the apartment complex and the pool were built for the film. Some of this film was shot in Levittown, Pennsylvania at a Jacobson logistics warehouse site. (M. Night Shyamalan has committed to using films sites in PA.) The set, built on the warehouse site, includes the apartment complex and a half city block of row houses. Occasional footage was shot inside the overflow area of the warehouse. Most of the filming was completed after Jacobson work hours.
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This movie was originally set up at Disney, but M. Night Shyamalan departed from the studio over "creative differences", and brought it to Warner Brothers. Disney has produced Shyamalan's previous four films, and the studio's subsidiary Miramax Films also produced Wide Awake (1998) which Shyamalan wrote and directed. This departure became the subject of the book "The Man Who Heard Voices: Or, How M. Night Shyamalan Risked His Career on a Fairy Tale".
Second collaboration between Bryce Dallas Howard and M. Night Shyamalan after previously working together in The Village (2004).
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Contrary to popular belief, the creatures in the film are not based on any mythological creatures and were all invented by M. Night Shyamalan. The only creature to be based off of an existing illustration is the Narf which is inspired by water sprites, nymphs, and water-faeries.
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M. Night Shyamalan's wish list for his various male supporting roles included names such as William Hurt, Sidney Poitier, Chris Cooper, Gene Wilder, Terrence Howard, Alec Baldwin, Vince Vaughn, Forest Whitaker, and Don Cheadle among others.
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To date, it Is the longest film of M. Night Shyamalan's career with a runtime of 110 minutes.
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Film debut of Noah Gray-Cabey.
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The band playing at the party is Silvertide.
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The character of the film critic Harry Farber is named after the late critic, painter, and writer Manny Farber (who unfortunately passed away 2 years after this film's theatrical release) who was often described as "iconoclastic".
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The title of the book "The Man Who Heard Voices: Or, How M. Night Shyamalan Risked His Career on a Fairy Tale" that recounted the making of the film is an intentional homage to Stanley Kubrick's film Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964).
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Bob Balaban and Mary Beth Hurt previously worked on the film Parents (1989) with Balaban serving as director.
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Director Trademark 

M. Night Shyamalan: [Pennsylvania] Shyamalan demanded that the set be within 45 minutes of his Pennsylvania home. He timed the trip which took 43 minutes.
M. Night Shyamalan: [self] Acting in his movies. His character, "Vick Ran", is a reference to Vikram Seth, an Indian author.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

This film was the first of M. Night Shyamalan's filmography not to contain his traditional twist ending of sorts.
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