Little Miss Sunshine
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004

1-20 of 167 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


St. Vincent – The Review

16 October 2014 9:25 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Bill Murray has always played the nice guy. Whether on-screen in one of his many iconic roles or off-screen singing karaoke with fans or giving spontaneous bachelor party speeches (yes… that has happened), Bill Murray seems to wander intermittently in and out of our lives like that stoic but occasionally goofy uncle that you’ve always admired. His career has been partially eclipsed by his public reputation as of late, but St. Vincent is here to tarnish it with a bad-boy image. Well… maybe just a little.

Bill Murray plays a crotchety boozer named Vincent. His thrown-together appearance and house in shambles is just the start of the deeper problems that lie within. Around every corner is another person who he’s indebted to (one of which is a fellow gambler from the racetrack played by Terrence Howard). Vincent sees an opportunity to get himself out of the hole when »

- Michael Haffner

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Toni Collette Shows Off New Buzzed 'Do!

10 October 2014 12:45 PM, PDT | TooFab | See recent TooFab news »

Toni Collette has said goodbye to her long locks!The actress showed off her bleached blonde buzz cut at a photo call for her new film "Miss You Already" in London on Thursday. Collette looked gorgeous and confident as she posed for pics with costar Drew Barrymore at the event and sported a pink pin for Breast Cancer Awareness month.The "Little Miss Sunshine" star shaved her head to play a cancer patient in the drama which follows two life-long gal pals whose friendship's put to the test when one becomes ill and the other begins a family, according to IMDb. While we're guessing the new 'do is just a temporary look for the 41-year-old beauty, we think she can definitely rock the cut. What do you think about Toni's new look? Tell toofab in the comment section below and check out the gallery above to see even more stars who've shaved their heads! »

- tooFab Staff

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Producers Guild Names Three Finalists in Short Film Competition

9 October 2014 11:10 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

To help emerging filmmakers launch their careers, the Producers Guild of America named three finalists in the Make Your Mark short film competition on Thursday The finalists will create new shorts with mentors Bruce Cohen (“Silver Linings Playbook”), Gale Anne Hurd (“The Walking Dead”) and Peter Saraf (“Little Miss Sunshine”) and compete to see a portion of their film on a 30-second spot for Cadillac aired during the Oscar telecast in 2015. See Photos: TheWrap's 2014 ShortList Film Fest Rocks YouTube Space La (Photos) The finalists are Michael Burke and Ian Wagner; Alvaro Ron; and Tim Wen and Chidi Onyejuruwa. “We take »

- Gina Hall

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The Academy’s Producer Dilemma

8 October 2014 8:30 AM, PDT | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor 

Determining which producers can receive recognition at the Oscars for a best picture nomination has been debated for years, particularly since Shakespeare in Love (1998) won at the 71st Academy Awards. This could be up for debate again this year due to the potential exclusion of two Boyhood producers during the upcoming Oscars. As first reported by The Wrap, John Sloss, a lawyer and producer, and Jonathan Sehring, president of IFC Films — which financed and distributed the film — are listed as producers on the film, but they were not recognized by the Producers Guild of America (PGA).

The rules for producers and nominations have changed multiple times since 1999, with the most recent change made this year. The rule states that two-person producing teams could count as a single “producer” should the team meet specific requirements. Here’s a brief look at the history and controversy behind »

- Anjelica Oswald

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Ray Winstone: 'Jack Nicholson and I just didn't click on The Departed'

8 October 2014 6:54 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Ray Winstone has revealed he and Jack Nicholson didn't get on when the pair filmed The Departed.

The actor played right hand man Arnold 'Frenchy' French to Nicholson's Frank Costello in Martin Scorsese's Oscar-winning 2006 film.

He said: "Me and Jack did not seem to get on too well. Maybe he was going through a funny time. Everyone else loves him to death - I just wanted him to be a great guy.

"We just did not click... on the film it works and all that, you know? I'll probably meet him tomorrow and he'll be as good as gold, you know? It happens sometimes, you know."

Winstone was speaking at a BAFTA Life In Pictures event held in his honour, and he also described how he persuaded Scorsese to give him the role of Frenchy.

"I went to see Marty in the Dorchester Hotel," he recalled. "It was Sunday morning, »

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The Maze Runner! The Equalizer! – Watch this week’s Us Box Office Chaps!

30 September 2014 10:18 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Flickering Myth co-editor Oliver Davis and film boffin Sam Winchester discuss the Us Box Office Top 5 from the weekend 26-28th September, 2014, casting their English eyes across the pond!

The movies discussed are The Maze Runner (Dylan O’Brien), Dolphin Tale 2 (Morgan Freeman), The Boxtrolls (Simon Pegg), The Equalizer (Denzel Washington) and This is When I Leave You (Jason Bateman) – but in what order!? Find out in this week’s episode…

If you haven’t subscribed to Flickering Myth’s wonderful YouTube channel, you well should. It’s lovely.

Here’s a bit more information on the films discussed at the top of the Us Box Office…

The Maze Runner

…features Dylan O’Brien (Teen Wolf), Kaya Scodelario (Moon), Will Poulter (We’re the Millers), Thomas Brodie-Sangster (Game of Thrones) and Aml Ameen (The Butler).

The Equalizer

Denzel Washington plays McCall, a former black ops commando who has faked »

- Oliver Davis

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Fox Searchlight Promotes Acquisitions Exec Ray Strache

29 September 2014 11:35 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Fox Searchlight has promoted Ray Strache to the post of senior VP of acquisitions and co-productions.

He will jointly run the acquisitions department with Tony Safford, exec VP of worldwide acquisitions. Strache and Stafford will continue to report to presidents Nancy Utley and Steve Gilula.

Strache joined Fox as an assistant to then Fox chairman Tom Rothman and most recently held the post of VP of acquisitions and co-productions at Searchlight.

He’s been involved with “Napoleon Dynamite,” “Garden State,” “Little Miss Sunshine,” “Beasts of the Southern Wild” and “The Way, Way Back.”

 

 

»

- Dave McNary

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Pride Has One of the Best British Casts in Recent Memory

26 September 2014 5:45 AM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

If Pride were a politician, you’d want to vote for it, march for it, and sign up to make calls for it. This rah-rah-union, rah-rah-gay-rights, boo-hiss–Maggie Thatcher ensemble comedy-drama is a dazzler, one of those perfectly engineered crowd-pleasers like The Full Monty and Little Miss Sunshine that proves once again how movies are a great populist art. Is it a great piece of drama? Not really. It’s too tidy, too one-sided. But given that the second side is made up of homophobes and Thatcherite Tories, I didn’t much give a shite about balance. You?The film, directed by Matthew Warchus from a script by Stephen Beresford, takes place in 1984 during a nationwide U.K. coal-miner strike that Thatcher set out to break. The hook — a true one — is that way down in the wilds of bohemian London, a gay activist named Mark (Ben Schnetzer) had a brainstorm. »

- David Edelstein

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Genre Films Can Break the Oscar Norm

24 September 2014 8:37 AM, PDT | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Anjelica Oswald

Managing Editor 

Jake Gyllenhaal’s performance as a sleazy freelance TV reporter determined to go to any length in search of crime footage in Dan Gilroy’s Nightcrawler could get him “recognized as one of the most daring actors working in Hollywood today” and has been called some of the “best work of his career.” With this type of praise, award contention usually follows, but historically speaking, “genre films” don’t fare well at the Oscars. It’s not impossible for films that deviate from the Oscar norm — biopics, period pieces or dramas — to secure Oscar nominations for the actors involved, but looking back through the years, from 2000 to the present, shows that these films constitute a lower percentage of overall nominees.

Musicals are a type of “genre film” that actors have managed to score Oscar nominations for, though they have had more difficulty doing so since the late 60s. »

- Anjelica Oswald

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Casting Society of America to Honor Rob Marshall, Ellen Lewis

22 September 2014 3:36 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Rob Marshall and Ellen Lewis will be honored at this year’s Artios Awards, the Casting Society of America has announced.

Marshall, who received award recognition for his direction of films “Chicago,” “Memoirs of a Geisha” and “Nine,” as well as his 1998 Broadway revival of “Cabaret,” will receive the New York Apple Award. It honors New Yorkers who have made significant contributions with casting directors.

Lewis will receive the Hoyt Bowers award, which recognizes unique spirit, ideals and creativity in casting. Lewis has casted movies such as “Goodfellas,” “Forrest Gump” and “The Wolf of Wall Street,” and is known for her work with Martin Scorsese.

“Marshall and Lewis have defined excellence in their respective fields, and each has played a vital role in the advancement of the casting industry,” said Richard Hicks, president of the Casting Society of America. “Throughout their careers, the honorees and nominees have been instrumental in »

- Sebastian Torrelio

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Casting Society of America to Honor Rob Marshall, Ellen Lewis

22 September 2014 3:36 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Rob Marshall and Ellen Lewis will be honored at this year’s Artios Awards, the Casting Society of America has announced.

Marshall, who received award recognition for his direction of films “Chicago,” “Memoirs of a Geisha” and “Nine,” as well as his 1998 Broadway revival of “Cabaret,” will receive the New York Apple Award. It honors New Yorkers who have made significant contributions with casting directors.

Lewis will receive the Hoyt Bowers award, which recognizes unique spirit, ideals and creativity in casting. Lewis has casted movies such as “Goodfellas,” “Forrest Gump” and “The Wolf of Wall Street,” and is known for her work with Martin Scorsese.

“Marshall and Lewis have defined excellence in their respective fields, and each has played a vital role in the advancement of the casting industry,” said Richard Hicks, president of the Casting Society of America. “Throughout their careers, the honorees and nominees have been instrumental in »

- Sebastian Torrelio

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Casting Society to honor 'Into the Woods' director Rob Marshall at Artios Awards

22 September 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

While the Oscars have yet to make room for casting directors — a pivotal part of the Best Picture equation — the oversight isn't stopping the Casting Society of America from readying its third decade of picking up the Academy's slack. Csa announced Monday morning that the 30th Annual Artios Awards will honor Academy Award-nominated and Emmy Award-winning director Rob Marshall and Emmy Award-winning casting director Ellen Lewis for their individual work in the world of casting. The news arrives with nominations in categories of television, theater, new media and short film, and on the heels of the ceremony's move from November to Jan. 22, the thick of the awards season. Feature film nominations will be announced closer to the show date. Marshall, whose adaptation of Stephen Sondheim's "Into the Woods" bows Dec. 25, will receive the New York Apple Award, "recognizing individuals who have made special contributions to the New York entertainment »

- Matt Patches

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You Decide: Who will will Original Screenplay Oscar? 'Boyhood,' 'Foxcatcher' ...?

13 September 2014 5:09 PM, PDT | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

Who will win the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay? You can now make your predictions in our prediction center. -Break- You Decide: Who will will Adapted Screenplay Oscar? 'Unbroken,' 'Gone Girl' ...? It's hard to identify a common theme in this Oscar race; in the last 10 years, the award has gone to dramas ("Crash") and comedies ("Little Miss Sunshine," "Juno"), true stories ("Milk") and fiction ("The Hurt Locker"), period films ("The King's Speech") and sci-fi ("Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind," "Her"). But if there's one thing a screenplay winner usually needs, it's broad academy support. The last nine winners in a row were also Best Picture nominees. A number of strong Best Picture hopefuls might contend for their original scripts, including "Boyhood," written and directed by two-time past Oscar-nominee Richard »

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Heroes and Villains: 'Love & Mercy''s Paul Dano on Playing Brian Wilson

13 September 2014 6:00 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

The guy in the short-sleeved, striped button-down shirt certainly looks happy enough, playing the bass alongside his brothers and relatives, watching the kids dance to his band's hits about girls and cars and surfing. But something is clearly troubling the Beach Boys' singer-songwriter and resident musical genius Brian Wilson, and in the film Love & Mercy, the epiphany that will give birth to both creative heights and a descent into dark times is communicated in a few facial expressions. There's the silent look of dread on Wilson's face, as hears »

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Review: Melancholy 'The Skeleton Twins' Starring Kristin Wiig & Bill Hader

10 September 2014 3:04 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

For whatever reason, comedians have never received the same degree of respect as their dramatic counterparts —that is, until they take on more serious material. The road to critical esteem is littered with actors making the transition from comedy to drama (think Steve Carell in "Little Miss Sunshine" or Bill Murray in "Broken Flowers"), and the latest pair to cross over are former ”Saturday Night Live” stars Kristen Wiig and Bill Hader, both delivering impressive turns as a pair of depressive siblings in the dramedy “The Skeleton Twins.” The film opens with concurrent, unsuccessful, suicide attempts from the two: Maggie (Wiig) is a dental assistant living in the small New York town she grew up in, while Milo (Hader) is a struggling actor in La whose recent breakup sent him off the deep end. Though the pair have not spoken in 10 years, Milo’s situation brings him back home to stay with his sister, »

- Cory Everett

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Alan Arkin, Michelle Monaghan Set for San Diego Film Festival Honors

10 September 2014 1:45 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The San Diego Film Festival will honor Alan Arkin with its inaugural Gregory Peck Award at “Variety’s Night of the Stars: A Tribute” event on Sept. 25.

The event was established in collaboration with Peck’s daughter Cecilia Peck to honor an individual who has made a signification contribution to the world of filmmaking, and whose work reflects the spirit of the late Gregory Peck.

Arkin’s career spans more than 45 years with a filmography of over 70 titles. He’s been nominated for four Oscars and won a supporting award for “Little Miss Sunshine.”

The festival will also honor Michelle Monaghan at the event with its Sol de Oro award for her performance as an Army medic returning home from an extended deployment in “Fort Bliss.”

Alison Pill of HBO’s “The Newsroom” will receive the Virtuoso award for achievement in breakthrough performances. The American Legacy Award will be given »

- Dave McNary

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Ranked: Every Summer Movie Season Since 1980 - Part 1

8 September 2014 4:11 AM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Summer movie season is a magic time of year when Hollywood traditionally rolls out its most appealing merchandise. It’s true that some summer movie seasons are better than others. This is our ranking of all the summer movie seasons since 1980 from worst to best. 

On January 20th, 1975, Steven Spielberg and Universal Studios released Jaws. The movie landscape would be forever changed from that date. Jaws is widely credited as being the first blockbuster film because it was the first movie to make over $100 million (non-adjusted). The fact that the film had a meager $8 million budget meant that it was a huge cash cow for the studio and rocketed Spielberg to the the forefront of a new generation of filmmakers for a new era of movie mass-consumption. George Lucas and Spielberg followed up in 1977 with Star Wars, which became a sensational and very profitable hit. It helped to convince production »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (G.S. Perno)

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'Ender's Game' Star -- My Trailer Better Be As Big As Abigail Breslin's

6 September 2014 12:20 AM, PDT | TMZ | See recent TMZ news »

Size definitely mattered for the teenage stars of "Ender's Game" ... who had a mine's-bigger-than-yours attitude on the set ... at least as far as their dressing room trailers were concerned. Both Asa Butterfield and Hailee Steinfeld made sure they didn't get stuck with a dinky or crappy trailer ... by including specific language in their minor's contracts. Studios are required to file these with the court for all actors under 18. According to the legal docs obtained by »

- TMZ Staff

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Maps To The Stars Review [Tiff 2014]

4 September 2014 8:22 AM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

For a stretch in the mid-aughts, it looked as though Canadian provocateur David Cronenberg had gone a bit Hollywood, despite never shooting any of his films there. Having built a career on the psychologically and visually grotesque, the three-peat of A History of Violence, Eastern Promises and A Dangerous Method saw Cronenberg attracting big names to awards-buzz material that, while still beholden to his darker impulses, played well with critics. Then 2012’s Cosmopolis started him down a slippery slope leading back to material as confounding as it was disturbing. His latest, Maps to the Stars, marks Cronenberg’s full-blown relapse into misanthropic weirdness, but with more expensive drugs at his disposal.

The first of his pictures to actually shoot in America is just as much concerned with atrophying empire as Cosmopolis was, but centers on the sunny Hollywood rot of the entertainment industry, instead of New York’s well-tailored economic sociopathy. »

- Sam Woolf

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Excerpt: Producer Sees New Opportunities for Independent Films in ‘Hope for Film’

29 August 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

I started using the phrase “a complete systems reboot” to describe what was needed for the film industry. Unless this happened, we were fated to stay mired in an outdated and unsustainable model. In the 1990s, two key tactics of independent producers were to make movies for underserved audiences and to differentiate ourselves in the marketplace. Independent film used to be a business of singles, not home runs — where a producer aimed for a million-dollar box office gross on a $200,000 spend. This approach allowed directors to experiment and take real risks in both form and content. And it worked because there were more newspaper film critics, arthouse theaters and foreign sales. But then “Pulp Fiction” exploded on the scene, and independent filmmaking became the business of profit margins rather than the underserved audience. You now had to make movies for everyone (be it “Little Miss Sunshine,” “Juno” or “Crouching Tiger, »

- Ted Hope

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