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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004

1-20 of 24 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


Logan Review

17 February 2017 1:29 PM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Jon Lyus

From the first scene, from the very first word in fact, it is clear that Logan is far from just another comic book movie. It may be the latest X-Men film to the fans but James Mangold and Hugh Jackman have created something distinct and different. We saw hints of what they wanted to achieve in their 2013 film The Wolverine but Logan is purposefully named. The raw narrative drive and the unrelenting violence make a solid foundation for a new type of Wolverine movie. This is not your comic book hero come to life, this is real life with all the pain and pathos that comes with it.

Logan is a very different beast. It shrinks its focus to a fine point, it collapses the worldwide grab of its superhero brethren to an almost claustrophobic hold. This film is less about saving the world, and far more about saving yourself. »

- Jon Lyus

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Interview: ‘Logan’ Director James Mangold on His Influences, PG-13 Violence, and the Political Relevance of the X-Men

16 February 2017 6:00 AM, PST | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Logan may technically be an X-Men spinoff, but it doesn’t really feel like an X-Men movie — or really any superhero movie, for that matter. It’s more akin to an offbeat road trip flick a la Little Miss Sunshine, filtered through a grimy Western vibe and undergirded by years of cinematic and comic book history. During a recent […]

The post Interview: ‘Logan’ Director James Mangold on His Influences, PG-13 Violence, and the Political Relevance of the X-Men appeared first on /Film. »

- Angie Han

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Sundance Film Fest 2017: Awards and Acquisitions

1 February 2017 9:00 AM, PST | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

The desert film fest that brought us “Little Miss Sunshine,” “Whiplash,” and this season’s “Manchester by the Sea” concluded Jan. 29 with an awards ceremony honoring some of the world’s most exciting indie filmmakers. The 2017 Sundance Film Festival premiered 119 feature-length and 68 short films, yielding several big acquisitions for Netflix, Amazon, and Sony Pictures Classics, and crowning many promising winners—titles that could reappear in the next film awards season. Larry Wilmore, Gael García Bernal, Peter Dinklage, and Sonia Braga were among the jurors selecting this year’s award recipients. The U.S. Grand Jury Prize for a dramatic feature, an award that in 2014 helped carry Damien Chazelle’s “Whiplash” to Oscar-winning status, went to Macon Blair’s directorial debut, a comedy-thriller starring Melanie Lynskey and Elijah Wood titled “I Don’t Feel at Home in This World Anymore.” The directing award for U.S. dramatic feature—which has in »

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How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love Sundance Hype

31 January 2017 9:39 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

I vividly remember the 2012 Sundance Film Festival, even though I was 2,000 miles away when it happened. That was the year “Beasts of the Southern Wild” premiered to the kind of rapturous response that’s usually reserved for new popes or Marvel trailers. The reviews were ecstatic, and on Twitter critics were falling over themselves to declare the movie a milestone in the history of independent cinema. I couldn’t wait to see it.

And then I did.

That’s when I decided that I had to go to Sundance for myself, that I had to vet these films first-hand. I was fascinated by the disconnect. I had big questions. Was the air in Park City as thin as they say? Why do Sundance films always seem to get over-hyped while Cannes films always seem to get under-hyped? (I’ll never forgive the shrugged response to “Certified Copy.”)

And then, on »

- David Ehrlich

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Sundance 2017: Key Deals Mean Buzz Titles Are Heading to Theaters

27 January 2017 3:00 PM, PST | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Once upon a time, big sales at the Sundance Film Festival made big news. Back in 2006, Fox Searchlight made a record-breaking deal for Little Miss Sunshine, paying more than $10 million for distribution rights; the movie eventually earned more than $100 million worldwide. Last year, the company hoped to repeat that kind of success, reportedly paying $17.5 million for distribution rights to the striking historical drama The Birth of a Nation. Unfortunately, the movie became mired in controversy around filmmaker Nate Parker's personal past before it was released in the fall. Fox Searchlight may end up breaking even on the deal, but it's far from the blockbuster that was anticipated. This year has seen a good number of deals, which means we'll get to see a lot of the...

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- Peter Martin

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7 Dysfunctional Film Families in Screen Actors Guild Awards History

26 January 2017 2:00 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Everyone loves a good family drama, or dramedy, or dark comedy — or whatever your personal genre-demarcation preference may be — and they’re usually awards-show catnip. Whether it’s a more whimsically dysfunctional family like the Hoovers in Little Miss Sunshine or a decidedly sardonic group like the Burnhams in American Beauty, your nuclear unit probably seems normal in comparison. Check out seven of the more unhinged family-centric Screen Actors Guild Awards darlings.

American Beauty, 1999

Well, dad’s midlife crisis entails smoking pot, lusting after his daughter’s teenage friend, and quitting his job to a buy a sweet hot rod »

- alexheigl

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Sundance 2017. Correspondences #3

25 January 2017 11:22 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

A Ghost StoryDear Lawrence,Almost every major festival has a hidden holy grail, the one film that will justify trudging through thick snow, the one film that will sustain us through less than ideal conditions, and the one film that will remain in our memory long after the festival is over. But because of how Sundance is programmed, marketed and covered, finding that film is impossible without trial and error, as you probably know all too well by now. Almost everything is positioned as the next something-or-other: the next all-timer, the next Best Picture winner, or the next Juno, Little Miss Sunshine or what have you. Have you been checking Twitter, reading the press releases, keeping up with all the “takes”? When I was here last year, there was the big hoopla over Birth of a Nation, which garnered universal acclaim and was the most expensive acquisition of the festival’s history. »

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Sundance Film Review: ‘The Last Word’

24 January 2017 9:57 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Here’s a new movie rule: If you’re going to sit through a Sundance “crowd-pleaser,” complete with cardboard situations and cheeseball snark and life lessons, it’s always better if that movie stars Shirley MacLaine. In “The Last Word,” she plays — what else? — a cutely difficult pie-eyed pixie-curmudgeon who is always scolding everyone and telling them how to improve themselves. I can think of many films where she played a similar role that outclass this one — like “Terms of Endearment,” “In Her Shoes,” “Bernie,” or “Postcards from the Edge.” Those were real movies. “The Last Word,” written by Stuart Ross Fink and directed by Mark Pellington, is an eager assemblage of quasi-fake setups and two-stroke characters. It makes “Little Miss Sunshine” look…organic. (It’s also not nearly as well-made.) Yet MacLaine, who isn’t above falling into high-concept shtick herself, hasn’t lost the gift of spontaneity. At 82, she’s spry and fearless. »

- Owen Gleiberman

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Get a Closer Look at the X-Men Comic Featured in Logan

24 January 2017 9:43 AM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

When the final Logan trailer debuted last week, one of the early scenes featured Hugh Jackman's title character discovering that Dafne Keen's X-23 is a fan of the X-Men comics. We get a brief glimpse at some of the panels, as Logan rmuses that "maybe a quarter of it happened," referring to the events depicted in these fictional pages. As it turns out, this on-screen comic book was actually brought to life for the film by Marvel's chief creative officer, Joe Quesada, who is sharing the page as seen in the trailer. If that wasn't enough, Hugh Jackman just debuted a sneak peek at the new Empire Magazine cover featuring a look at Logan after having been shot numerous times, along with four more photos from inside magazine.

Joe Quesada posted the comic book images on his Tumblr page last night, explaining how he worked closely with Wolverine »

- MovieWeb

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‘Logan’ Images: X-23 Unleashes the Fury

24 January 2017 7:00 AM, PST | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

The latest trailer for Logan continued to help make James Mangold‘s film stand out from the herd. Everything we’ve seen so far from the R-rated comic book movie implies what Mangold has been saying all along: this isn’t your average superhero movie.  Hugh Jackman recently described Logan as a slightly more violent Little Miss Sunshine, which isn’t the typical go-to reference […]

The post ‘Logan’ Images: X-23 Unleashes the Fury appeared first on /Film. »

- Jack Giroux

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Amazon Scraps ‘Highston’ Comedy Series From Bob Nelson & Sacha Baron Cohen

23 January 2017 10:50 PM, PST | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Amazon has opted not to proceed with the new comedy series Highston. The streaming service picked up to series the pilot — written by Oscar-nominee Bob Nelson (Nebraska), directed by Little Miss Sunshine helmers Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris, and executive produced by Sacha Baron Cohen — in December 2015. But it was never scheduled, and tonight, after co-star Curtis Armstrong tweeted that the show was dead, the development was confirmed by Amazon. "We love Bob, Jon… »

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Sacha Baron Cohen Comedy Series 'Highston' Scrapped at Amazon

23 January 2017 9:22 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter - TV News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - TV News news »

Amazon is no longer moving forward with comedy series Highston.

More than a year after it handed out a six-episode series order to the comedy exec produced by Borat's Sacha Baron Cohen, the streaming service has abandoned the project, The Hollywood Reporter has confirmed.

Written by Bob Nelson (Nebraska) and directed by Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris (Little Miss Sunshine), family comedy Highston centered around 19-year-old Highston Liggetts (Lewis Pullman), who has a number of celebrity friends that only he can see. His parents, played by Mary Lynn Rajskub and Chris Parnell, force him to get psychiatric help, but his Uncle Billy (Curtis Armstrong) thinks he's fine. »

- Lesley Goldberg

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Wolverine And X-23 Get Their Claws Out In These Awesome New Logan Stills

23 January 2017 5:22 PM, PST | ComicBookMovie.com | See recent ComicBookMovie news »

We brought you guys a first look at Empire Magazine's subscribers cover earlier on, and now we have 4 brand new stills from James Mangold's Logan. They mainly focus on young Dafne Keen as Laura/X-23, but there's also a stunning new shot of Hugh Jackman's iconic former X-Man standing in the forest with his claws bared. In a new interview, Jackman describes Logan as "a darker version of Little Miss Sunshine", and tells an amusingly profane story about shooting a scene in which his character loses his temper with Laura. “I just yelled, ‘Shut The Fuck Up!’” says the Aussie star. “At the end of 40 minutes of this I went up to Maria, Dafne’s mum, and I said, ‘Maria, I’ve got an 11-year-old and I’m just really sorry.’ Maria said, ‘Aw, don’t worry, she just called you a c*nt. In Spanish.’” Lovely! Check out »

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X-23 is finally unleashed in these new hi-res images from Logan

23 January 2017 4:29 PM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Josh Wilding

The recently released trailer made it clear that Logan looks set to be something special, and now a new batch of hi-res images have been released which offer another tease of what’s to come in the movie. Excitingly, they give us our first proper look at X-23 in action as the claws finally come out and the future Wolverine finally leaps into action alongside Logan.

Talking about reuniting with The Wolverine director James Mangold, Hugh Jackman found a unique way to describe the movie in a recent chat with Empire Magazine. “It’s a darker version of Little Miss Sunshine, with the three of us on the road.“Slightly more violence!”

Talking about X-23 (Dafne Keen), the actor then went on to recall what sounds like a tense scene between her and Wolverine. “I just yelled, ‘Shut The Fuck Up!’ At the end of 40 minutes of »

- Josh Wilding

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James Mangold Talks Logan at 20th Century Fox’s Genre Showcase, Read Our Impressions of the First 42 Minutes

23 January 2017 9:52 AM, PST | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

In December at their 2017 Genre Showcase event, 20th Century Fox previewed the first 42 minutes of Logan, the eagerly awaited final chapter of the Wolverine saga. Daily Dead was in attendance at the event, and to give readers a big idea of what to expect, we have highlights from director James Mangold’s comments at the event, as well as our impressions of the intense footage that was shown.

After appearing as the character in now nine films (including his X-Men: First Class cameo) Hugh Jackman teams up once again with director James Mangold to bring his run as the “Mutant Formerly Known As Weapon X” to an end.

The two last brought the character to the screen in 2013 with The Wolverine, when original director Darren Aronofsky bowed out after a lengthy pre-production phase. The results were mostly positive, but moments felt hamstrung by superhero movie clichés, such as the out-of-place »

- Jason Alvino

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Logan Helmer James Mangold Sets The Record Straight Regarding Film’s Timeline; Empire Pics Emerge

23 January 2017 9:38 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

See Full Gallery Here

In typical tongue-in-cheek fashion, it was Ryan Reynolds’ Merc With a Mouth that once labeled the X-Men series as a difficult butterfly to pin (“McAvoy or Stewart? These timelines are so confusing.”), and given that Fox’s franchise now spans multiple movies across many different eras, you can hardly blame him.

But with Logan, a dystopian road flick set in the year 2029, writer-director James Mangold has consciously carved out a corner of the universe that is far removed from any other X-Men movie. It’s a decision that lends both Mangold and his team enough creative freedom to craft Wolverine’s final chapter as intended – “clear of existing entanglements,” as the director himself so aptly put.

That being said, there’s been some lingering confusion over Logan‘s timeline and, specifically, where it fits into the overarching universe. Lead star Hugh Jackman recently hinted that Wolverine »

- Michael Briers

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Plan B’s Dede Gardner and Jeremy Kleiner Tell Sundance Producers to Look ‘Beyond Dollars and Cents’ (Exclusive)

22 January 2017 12:00 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editors’s Note: Earlier today, producers and Plan B co-presidents Jeremy Kleiner and Dede Gardner were honored at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival’s Producers Lunch. Below is Kleiner’s keynote speech in its entirety.]

Dede Gardner and I want to thank Michelle Satter and Anne Lai. It is extremely humbling to have this opportunity and to follow in a tradition of producers we respect and admire, speaking to their peers in a spirit of solidarity – producers being the boundary-less, restless misfits who clearly do not fit into any other facet of civilized society.

Read More: How ‘Moonlight’ Beat the Odds to Reach Theaters In African-American Neighborhoods

We want to thank Sundance Institute. Standing on the precipice of mass conglomeration, the disruption of the theatrical distribution business, and peak television, all this uncertainty, it is very hard to overstate what Sundance Institute, and the Sundance Film Festival, have given all of us all of these years.

I remember January 1999 like it was yesterday. This is the height of the Clinton impeachment proceedings. I was working an assistant job fresh out of college. I was very passionate about film, »

- Graham Winfrey

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Sundance: Kumail and Emily retell their distinctive love story in a wonderful new comedy

21 January 2017 12:27 PM, PST | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

When a critic describes something as a “Sundance movie,” they usually mean it disparagingly. (Sometimes they just mean a “movie that played at Sundance,” but that’s not what I’m talking about.) The expression has become a lazy but admittedly useful shorthand, a way to identify a particular kind of film that traditionally goes over like gangbusters in Park City. These are cheerful crowd-pleasers that don’t push their audiences too hard. They tend to mix comedy and drama, sometimes in a way not so different than what a Very Special Episode of a network sitcom might offer. They star well known actors. They often get picked up by Fox Searchlight and get slapped with a bright yellow poster. Little Miss Sunshine is the quintessential Sundance movie, by dint of its aggressive mediocrity and the fact that it both sold for and made a boatload of money.

I’m »

- A.A. Dowd

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Buyer or Seller, Selling a Movie At Sundance 2017 Is More Complicated Than Ever

21 January 2017 10:50 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

On Friday in Park City, the bidding wars opened for business. Fox Searchlight co-president Nancy Utley began and ended her day at the Eccles Theatre, where the Sundance premieres culminated with the big acquisition title, “The Big Sick,” directed by Michael Showalter and produced by Judd Apatow. Appetites remain high for Sundance titles, but last year proved to be a teachable moment for indie distribution: There’s a big difference between being able to compete for a title, and successfully gauging what will work in the marketplace.

“The marketplace is always changing, but now it is changing more rapidly, both on the production and consumer side,” said Searchlight co-president Stephen Gilula. “The bar for theatrical viability keeps going up. While we are talking about other models, Searchlight is still a global, theatrically driven company, trying to make money on each individual title. We haven’t changed our acquisition calculus, but »

- Anne Thompson, Chris O'Falt and Graham Winfrey

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Buyer or Seller, Selling a Movie At Sundance 2017 Is More Complicated Than Ever

21 January 2017 10:50 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

On Friday in Park City, the bidding wars opened for business. Fox Searchlight co-president Nancy Utley began and ended her day at the Eccles Theatre, where the Sundance premieres culminated with the big acquisition title, “The Big Sick,” directed by Michael Showalter and produced by Judd Apatow. Appetites remain high for Sundance titles, but last year proved to be a teachable moment for indie distribution: There’s a big difference between being able to compete for a title, and successfully gauging what will work in the marketplace.

“The marketplace is always changing, but now it is changing more rapidly, both on the production and consumer side,” said Searchlight co-president Stephen Gilula. “The bar for theatrical viability keeps going up. While we are talking about other models, Searchlight is still a global, theatrically driven company, trying to make money on each individual title. We haven’t changed our acquisition calculus, but »

- Anne Thompson, Chris O'Falt and Graham Winfrey

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2004

1-20 of 24 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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