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A Tardy Recognition (1913)

Florence Aldrich is disinherited because she marries James Harrold against her father's wishes. Mr. Aldrich then gives all his money to his other children, John and Maud, who, after getting... See full summary »

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(as George A. Lessey)

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Cast

Cast overview:
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Thomas Aldrich
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John Aldrich
Edna Flugrath ...
Maud Aldrich
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Florence Aldrich
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James' Harrold - Florence's Husband
Edna Hammel ...
Alice - The Harrold Child
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Storyline

Florence Aldrich is disinherited because she marries James Harrold against her father's wishes. Mr. Aldrich then gives all his money to his other children, John and Maud, who, after getting possession of it, neglect the old man shamefully. In the meantime and later, through the acquaintanceship formed by their little daughter with an old man whom she always meets in the park, and who turns out to be the father, the estranged daughter and her husband are reconciled to their aged parent. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Short | Drama

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Release Date:

21 July 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Edison Company production number 7375. See more »

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The story is human and fairly believable
8 October 2017 | by See all my reviews

On a day when there are no very strong offerings among the regular releases, this seems to be the best. Its theme is old and it makes some difference, even though it is acted and produced fairly well. There are three unnecessarily crude moments in it; when it is to be shown that the old father is being neglected, a newspaper is snatched out of his hands. He is seated at the table and his daughter doesn't like to see the paper and, like many other wives and daughters, in pictures, snatches it. Her refusing to pour the coffee a bit later changed from the character who would snatch the paper; it would have been better to have had the old man want to pour for himself and have had her make a fuss. Then the emotion natural to the climax was lost by the leading woman's turning back to her husband when she has recognized her father whom she has not seen for years and lost track of. That tourist's hat didn't pass at once for a park workman's hat. The story is human and fairly believable. The characters are, for the most part, natural and .the photography of the interior is clear. The author is Charles M. Seay. - The Moving Picture World, August 2, 1913


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