Colonel Fairfax, in answer to his grandson's question as to why he does not like to hear the bell in the old church tower ring, tells the young man that nearly forty years ago he had ... See full summary »

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Cast

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Mrs. Fairfax
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The Grandson
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Col. Fairfax (ret.) (as Benjamin F. Wilson)
Marion Weeks ...
The Granddaughter
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The Mayor of the Village
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Storyline

Colonel Fairfax, in answer to his grandson's question as to why he does not like to hear the bell in the old church tower ring, tells the young man that nearly forty years ago he had ascended the old tower to remove the muffling that had been placed on the huge clapper for a funeral when the sexton began to pull the rope frantically in order to warn the countryside of the approach of British soldiers. Fairfax goes on to tell his grandson how he was imprisoned underneath the swinging bell, the roar of which drove him almost crazy. His cries for help were drowned by the clanging of the clapper, and he lay that way until one of the young girls, who had seen him go into the belfry in the morning, ordered the sexton to stop ringing the bell while she ascended the steps to the bell tower, where she rescued Fairfax, whose hair had turned snow white from fright, rage and exhaustion. In the meantime the villagers had succeeded in routing the Britishers and the countryside soon became as ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Short | Drama

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Release Date:

30 June 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Edison Company production number 7358. See more »

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Good, well-chosen scenes
22 September 2017 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

An offering giving a story of Revolutionary times with much to commend it. The story interests and has been made clear. We find good, well- chosen scenes and backgrounds which carry the action and naturally suggests the period. The costuming is also good. Perhaps the photography, which is fair, yet without that clear-cut quality that looks like real life, keeps it from seeming wholly natural and there are also moments, now and then, when it fails to convince; for instance, an ordinary person could have squirmed out from under the bell as it hung swinging in the picture. It was produced by Walter Edwin. - The Moving Picture World, July 12, 1913


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