IMDb > Punk: Attitude (2005) (TV)

Punk: Attitude (2005) (TV) More at IMDbPro »

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Punk: Attitude -- Redefining popular music and fashion, it threatened the establishment and legitimized an independent, do-it-yourself attitude. Punk inspired an entire generation of filmmakers, poets, photographers, fashion designers and graphic artists.

Overview

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Release Date:
4 July 2005 (USA) See more »
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Plot:
A documentary on the music, performers, attitude and distinctive look that made up punk rock. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
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User Reviews:
Nostalgic Film, Which is a Totally Un-Punk Thing See more (25 total) »

Cast

 

K.K. Barrett ... Himself
Roberta Bayley ... Herself
Jello Biafra ... Himself
Glenn Branca ... Musician, Composer
John Cale ... Himself
Bob Gruen ... Himself

Mary Harron ... Herself
John Holmstrom ... Himself

Chrissie Hynde ... Herself

Jim Jarmusch ... Himself
Darryl Jenifer ... Himself

David Johansen ... Himself
Mick Jones ... Himself

Wayne Kramer ... Himself
Glen Matlock ... Himself
Legs McNeil ... Himself
Thurston Moore ... Himself

Tommy Ramone ... Himself

Henry Rollins ... Himself
Captain Sensible ... Himself
Paul Simonon ... Himself
Siouxsie Sioux ... Herself
Pat Smear ... Himself

Poly Styrene ... Herself
Ari Up ... Herself

Directed by
Don Letts 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Don Letts 

Produced by
Alison Palmer Bourke .... executive producer: IFC
Allison Dore .... line producer
Anouk Fontaine .... producer
Julie Goldman .... executive producer: Cactus Three
Susan Heimbeinder .... supervising producer: IFC
Andrew Higgie .... executive producer
Pete Kalhan .... executive producer
Krysanne Katsoolis .... executive producer: Cactus Three
Dominic Saville .... executive producer
Henry Scott-Irvine .... archive producer
Evan Shapiro .... executive producer: IFC
Caroline Stevens .... executive producer: Cactus Three
Laura Traill .... executive producer: Metropolis
Lara von Ahlefeldt .... executive producer: 3DD
 
Cinematography by
Louis Mulvey 
 
Film Editing by
Steve Miller (off-line editor)
 
Makeup Department
Jo Frost .... make up
 
Production Management
Diana Hunter .... production manager: Los Angeles unit
Dan Snyder .... production manager: New York unit
Maggie Swinfen .... production manager
 
Sound Department
Nick Fry .... audio
Nick Fry .... dubbing mixer
Chris Reynolds .... sound recordist
Marc Stewart .... sound recordist: Los Angeles unit
Alex Sullivan .... sound recordist: New York unit
 
Visual Effects by
Barney Jordan .... effects
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Ken Morse .... rostrum
 
Editorial Department
Tim Ellison .... on-line editor
Merlin Hogarth .... assistant editor
Sonny Sheridan .... colourist
 
Music Department
Martyn LeNoble .... composer: songs "All Fall Down", "I Wanna" and "Tramp"
 
Other crew
Steve Blackwell .... runner
Sophie Evans .... publicist
Steve Gordon .... legal
Jess Gorick .... title sequence
Lisa Hernandez .... runner
Hazel Holtham .... production coordinator
Hazel Holtham .... researcher
Star Sawyer .... production coordinator: Los Angeles unit
Dan Snyder .... location manager: New York unit
 
Thanks
Terence Dackombe .... very special thanks
 

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Additional Details

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Runtime:
90 min
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Did You Know?

Quotes:
Tommy Ramone:What happened, though, was that because we were playing so fast, the three-minute songs became one-and-a-half-minute songs.See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Rewind This! (2013)See more »

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9 out of 17 people found the following review useful.
Nostalgic Film, Which is a Totally Un-Punk Thing, 9 July 2005
Author: Matt Wall from Somewhere in Soho

I have no doubt that future cultural historians and music cognoscenti will appreciate this competent and fairly broad-sweeping history of the original punk "movement" of the 1970s. But I have to say, as a forty-something who was "there" at the end of the 1970s, there's something unnerving and vaguely depressing to seeing a bunch of fifty- and sixty- somethings waxing nostalgically about their great good old days. I mean, my god, weren't we making fun of the hippies for growing up and going mainstream back in the day? There's nothing more unpunkrock in some ways than a documentary film about punk.

Come to think of it, I think punk may be safely said to have died the instant they started filming it, and Letts' own 'The Punk Rock Movie" was the original culprit. Taking the DIY attitude and transforming it into the mindscreen of the cinema, with all its implications for mass consumption, is a way not so much of preserving the original punk spirit as diluting it.

This is to say, that if anybody has a right to make a film about the scene way-back-when, it's the old-school Letts. (Although it was a bit awkward when he manages to let some of his interviewees refer to him in the third person.) As a documentary, it's a standard mix of stand-up interviews and old stills and footage from the period, which tells the "story" with the reflective blinkers of thirty years of hindsight. So I can't fault this as a movie qua movie.

Whoever takes credit for originating the phrase, "Talking about music is like dancing about architecture", they had it right. I had a hard time finishing watching this movie not because it was a poor telling of the tale -- far from it, my memories coincide with it exactly -- but because it seemed like a far better use of my time to dust off the vinyl of my collection and just listen to the music. Or maybe, even better, go out and find some new music by the current generation of snot-nosed rebels, which will prevent me from wallowing in nostalgia and kick my rear into gear. There's something about the genre of the film documentary that seems to add layers of dust to music and music culture, or sprays them with a preservative that may keep them for future generations but which seems stale as a living thing.

The one moment I loved above all in the flick was the appearance of the now-middle-aged and delicious Poly Styrene, who manages to come off as honest and fresh as she did in X-Ray Spex. But in general the shock of seeing virtually all the (surviving) great bands of the era in paunchy, balding, reflective -- dare I say, mature? -- late middle age made me wince. In about 2015, there'll be a similar documentary about old-school rap, followed ten years later by nostalgic flashbacks about techno and ecstasy...and so on.

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