6.8/10
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Driving Lessons (2006)

PG-13 | | Comedy, Drama | 13 October 2006 (USA)
A coming of age story about a shy teenage boy trying to escape from the influence of his domineering mother. His world changes when he begins to work for a retired actress.

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ON DISC
3 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Ben
Fay Cohen ...
Old Lady 1
Ruby Mortlock ...
Old Lady 2
Don Wetherhead ...
Old Man
...
...
Peter
...
...
Robert
...
Mr. Fincham
...
Evie
Chandra Ruegg ...
Chandra
...
Tough Looking Man
Rupert Holliday-Evans ...
Store Manager (as Rupert Holiday Evans)
Harriet Brock ...
Child at Campsite
James Brock ...
Child at Campsite
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Storyline

A coming of age story about a shy teenage boy trying to escape from the influence of his domineering mother. His world changes when he begins to work for a retired actress.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

All Ben wanted was a job. All Evie needed was a friend. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for language, sexual content and some thematic material | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

13 October 2006 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Driving Lessons - Mit Vollgas ins Leben  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$22,603 (USA) (13 October 2006)

Gross:

$238,774 (USA) (26 January 2007)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Julie Walters and Rupert Grint play mother and son in the Harry Potter movie series. See more »

Goofs

During the initial Edinburgh scenes, the background changes from raining to cloudy to almost clear, to rainy, all basically within the same shot. See more »

Quotes

Robert Marshall: [talking about Laura] I think it's better this way.
Ben: How can you say that? After all the shit she put you through, how can you say that to me? You're my dad! You're meant to stand up for yourself! You should've divorced her! You should've told her to bloody well fuck off!
Robert Marshall: I did. It was me who asked for the divorce.
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Crazy Credits

Dedication: "For Rod Hall, 1951-2004". See more »

Connections

References One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975) See more »

Soundtracks

Lord of All Hopefulness
by Jan Struther
Arranged by Philip Pope
Courtesy of Oxford University Press
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User Reviews

 
Moral and highly enjoyable
17 December 2006 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

"Driving Lessons" sees two middle class quintessential British families meet head on, when Grint's character comes into contact with Evee, (Walters), a slightly deranged out-of-touch actress with an ego. Grint betrays his overpowering, and over-Christian mother, (Linney), and goes off travelling with Evee to Scotland, to accompany her on a trip to participate in a Poetry reading, something she claims could be her last, due to an illness.

Grint's portrayal of a caged youngster, brainwashed by an overbearing, and even hypocritical mother, is the masterpiece of this film. His portrayal of a downtrodden teen in search of his true morals, and happiness, is captivating to watch unfold throughout. The film is sharply shot, and well paced, with very few moments leaving you tired, an achievement, particularly considering the nature of the plot. Walters really grabs hold of her character with both hands, and successfully brings the audience to her side of things, emphasising Linney's ironic immorality throughout. Her role in "Driving Lessons" is enjoyable and memorable in every sense.

The plot develops nicely, leaving the audience cheering on Grint as he chases back to Evee's place during his lunch break during his stint at a local bookshop to apologise for his wrongdoings. The values in the piece are continued and brought out thoroughly up until the final drag, in a very consistent way. The overbearing, (and relieving), main idea being that religion doesn't lead to happiness, and certainly doesn't lead to morality.

The audience are left sympathising with the radical but lovable Evee, with her and Grint making an irresistible partnership on the big screen, transferred directly from their debut in the "Harry Potter" series. Charismatic and beautiful acting together with a tight and fact paced script make this a must-see this Christmas.


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