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Alpha to Omega: Exposing 'The Osterman Weekend' (2004)

Testimony of the cast, the producers and other participants of the shootings of "The Osterman Weekend".

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Cast

Cast overview:
William N. Panzer ...
Himself (as Bill Panzer)
Peter S. Davis ...
Himself (as Peter Davis)
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Himself
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Himself
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Herself
Nick Redman ...
Himself / Narrator
Martin Baum ...
Himself
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Himself
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Herself
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Himself
...
Herself
Edward M. Abroms ...
Himself (as Ed Abroms)
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Himself
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Storyline

In 2004, this documentary was released to celebrate twenty-years of "The Osterman Weekend". This movie was the last work of the great director Sam Peckinpah, who had been in the ostracism for five years in Hollywood. With the testimony of the cast (Meg Foster, Rutger Hauer, Craig T. Nelson, Chris Sarandon, Helen Shaver, Cassie Yates), the producers and other participants of the shootings, many interesting information, some of them funny, other sad, about the film and mainly about the situation of Sam Peckinpah in those times, are disclosed to the viewer. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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23 March 2004 (USA)  »

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1.78 : 1
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Trivia

This feature-length documentary is featured on the 2-Disc Commemorative Edition DVD for The Osterman Weekend (1983), released in 2004. See more »

Connections

References Blade Runner (1982) See more »

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Sam he was
8 April 2008 | by (Denmark) – See all my reviews

This is a feature-length(!) behind-the-scenes type documentary on The Osterman Weekend, found on the second disc of the 2-Disc Commemorative Edition of said production, released in 2004, two decades after the death of Peckinpah. It's perhaps more about him than the title, but I'm not complaining. There is some analysis of him, and the seemingly obligatory love-fest-type comments, as well as several anecdotes from the entire thing. It's mainly made up of obviously quite new interview bits, a few looks at the locations and the like, with a handful of clips of the film itself, as well as stills from both the product itself and the making of. It's all edited together well, with so little use of gimmicks and flash that it never gets to be over the top. They talk about the message of the film, and how relevant it is today. Each gets a fine amount of on-screen time, and you never get to the point where you're tired of listening to any of them, nor really feel that any were favored over the rest. At about 78 minutes, this is really only half an hour shorter than the movie it is about, but it never loses your interest during its run. I recommend this to anyone who liked The Osterman Weekend, and Sam Peckinpah in general, as well as anyone who wants to know more about either or both. 7/10


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