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Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan (2006) Poster

Trivia

The police were called on Sacha Baron Cohen 92 times during the production of this film.
Jump to: Spoilers (1)
Borat is based on a Russian doctor Sacha Baron Cohen once met. He said the doctor was completely hilarious, but it was unintentional.
Seth Rogen and Patton Oswalt made uncredited writing contributions.
Johnny Depp, George Clooney and Steve Martin, all of whom are huge fans of Sacha Baron Cohen, contacted him about having a cameo in the movie. But Baron Cohen refused because it would have ruined some of the gags if they knew what was going on.
The suit Sacha Baron Cohen wears when playing Borat has deliberately never been cleaned.
When Sacha Baron Cohen speaks Kazakh it is mostly Hebrew disguised by a heavy fake Eastern European accent. The Hebrew is quite understandable and contains many in-jokes. Baron Cohen admitted this in a rare "out of character" radio interview on National Public Radio in the USA.
Rupert Murdoch announced in early February 2007 that Sacha Baron Cohen had signed on to do another Borat film with FOX. This was contradicted, however, by an interview with Cohen himself stating that Borat was to be discontinued, as he was now too well known to avoid detection as he did in the film and on Da Ali G Show (2003). A spokesman for FOX later stated that it was too early to begin planning such a film, although they still remain open to the idea. Cohen subsequently announced that he was "killing off" the characters of Borat and Ali G because they were now so famous he could no longer trick people.
The name of Borat's neighbor, Nursultan Tuyakbay, is a cross between the names of Kazakh President Nursultan Nazarbayev and opposition politician Zharmakhan Tuyakbay.
This film broke Fahrenheit 9/11 (2004)'s record for the biggest box office opening weekend ever for any film that opened in fewer than a thousand theaters.
The character of "Borat" was heavily criticized by the Kazakh Government, "being a concoction of bad taste and ill manners which is incompatible with the ethics and civilized behavior of Kazakhstan's people". Sacha Baron Cohen aka "Borat" gave a faked press conference at the White House gates on 29 September 2006, just one day before an official visit of Kazakhstan's president. The Kazakh government hired two Western public relations firms to counter Borat's claims, running a four-page advertisement in The New York Times implicitly rebutting many of the claims made by Borat. Kazahkstan has since changed their strategy by playing along, going so far as inviting Borat to visit Kazahkstan.
The Region 1 and 2 DVDs are made to look like pirated versions of the film. They come on "Demorez" brand discs with the slogan: "Is life? No. Demorez.". The "Demorez" fake brand and slogan are meant to be spoofs of the real-life "Memorex" blank recordable DVDs, whose slogan was "Is it live? No, it's Memorex."
The subtitles in Borat are Cyrillic subtitles. Most of these subtitles are real Cyrillic, but they contain many errors, mostly the incorrect use of Cyrillic letters. Some subtitles make no sense, for example the gay pride parade subtitle reads "Meal Society of the 'Magnolia' manor". Some subtitles are nothing more than a random stream of Cyrillic letters, for example the title of the Kazakh TV channel at the beginning of the movie, and the supposedly Kazakh title of the movie later. The geographical names on the maps are almost all gibberish, except for the names in the largest print, such as "America" or "London". Ironically, the Cyrillic text used for the names that appear during the end credits is quite correct.
Original director Todd Phillips left the production after shooting the rodeo/"Star Spangled Banner" scene, citing "creative differences".
Azamat Bagatov is actually speaking Armenian. Ken Davitian is of Armenian descent.
Most of the footage from the Kazakh national anthem segment at the end of the film is made up of 1980's era Estonian TV commercials. It also features a number of political figures, the current president of Azerbaijan, Ilham Aliyev among them.
Borat's greeting "Jak sie masz!" is a common Polish greeting, roughly translated to "How are you?" Other phrases in Polish used by Borat are "dzien dobry" (good morning) and "dziekuje" (thank you).
The European Center for Antiziganism Research, which works against negative attitudes against Roma and Sinti people, accused the producers of defamation and inciting violence against the ethnic group. Thus, it filed a complaint with prosecutors in Germany (October 2006).
The unusual route that Borat takes to fly from Kazakhstan to America makes the following stops: Moscow, Northern Turkey, Central Algeria, Kiev (Ukraine), Southwestern Russia (possibly Rostov or Sochi--the latter soon to host the 2014 Winter Olympics), Helsinki (Finland), Southern Greenland, and finally to John F. Kennedy Airport in New York City.
The turboprop aircraft in which Borat is depicted as flying, is apparently wearing livery that includes Cyrillic-looking letters. The airplane is a Lockheed L-188 Electra, wearing Eastern Airlines livery of the late 1950's to early 1960's, and the image is reversed. Airlines then considered it important to trumpet using any turbine-powered engines as "jets". Thus the letters on the fuselage read, "FLY-EASTERN AIRLINES PROP-JET ELECTRA".
The A in "BORAT" on the DVD cover is actually the letter D in the Cyrillic alphabet. Also on the inside DVD cover, the R in "BORAT" is backwards, which is actually the character "Ya" in Cyrillic.

Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

When Azamat opens the fridge at his apartment in Hollywood, you can see the head of Oxanna the bear.

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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