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No Trifling with Love (1910)

On ne badine pas avec l'amour (original title)
The Baron intends to marry his son Perdican to his niece Camille, who has just left the convent. The two young people meet again after ten years of separation in the manor where they have ... See full summary »

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Berthe Bovy ...
Nelly Cormon ...
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Storyline

The Baron intends to marry his son Perdican to his niece Camille, who has just left the convent. The two young people meet again after ten years of separation in the manor where they have grown, played and loved each other. The trouble is that Camille, indoctrinated by the nurses, distrusts all men, including Perdican, and wishes to devote herself to God. She therefore rejects her cousin's advances. Perdican is desperate but after a while he thinks he has found a way out: he will seduce Rosette, a young farm girl and Camille's foster sister, and arouse the jealousy of his cousin. But is flirting with love such a good idea? Written by Guy Bellinger

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Genres:

Short | Comedy

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Release Date:

25 March 1910 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

No Trifling with Love  »

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(150 m in color)|

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Trivia

Released in the US as a split reel along with The Banks of the Ganges (1910). See more »

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One's nerves become tense under the strains
1 April 2015 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A strongly dramatic representation of the results of a man's duplicity when he makes love to one girl for the purpose of arousing jealousy in another and thereby shaking her purpose to enter a convent. The acting is sympathetic, and one's nerves become tense under the strains of the acting of Rosette as she lushes toward the lake and throws herself in. And there is another dramatic scene when her body is discovered and vain attempts are made to resuscitate her. The picture is a tragedy, depicting very clearly the terrible results of a man trifling with such a serious matter as an affair of the heart. - The Moving Picture World, April 9, 1910


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