Col. Scott does not approve of either Lieut. Wilbur or Jim Virden, who spend most of their time in the company of his daughters, Genie and Jessie. The colonel faces ruination through his ... See full summary »

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(as Frank E. Montgomery)

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(scenario)
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Cast

Cast overview:
Frank Richardson ...
Colonel Scott
Frank Clark ...
Count Orloff
...
Lieutenant Wibur
...
Jim Virden
...
Jessie Scott
Count Alberti ...
Servant
Iva Shepard ...
Genie Scott
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Storyline

Col. Scott does not approve of either Lieut. Wilbur or Jim Virden, who spend most of their time in the company of his daughters, Genie and Jessie. The colonel faces ruination through his gambling losses with Count Orloff. The count proposes to return his winnings if the colonel will supply him with plans of certain fortifications. Forced to it, the colonel agrees. Jim overhears the bargain and steals the plans himself. The count then proposes that the colonel give him his daughter Genie in place of the plans. The girl is about to sacrifice herself to save her father's honor, when the lieutenant and Jim intercept the count in the act of stealing a telegram, which has just arrived, notifying the colonel of a fair-sized fortune which awaits him. The count is disposed of in short order, and the plans returned. The colonel is so happy that he willingly consents to a double marriage. Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Short

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Release Date:

22 January 1912 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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The story outrages human probability, common sense and even decency
20 August 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

A melodrama in which a United States colonel who has charge of fortifications loses at cards more than he can pay to a Russian count who is a spy and wants to get plans of the fortress. The count loves the colonel's older daughter. The colonel in despair, compromises with his honor and, rather than give him the daughter, prepares to hand over to him what he thinks is the plan of the fort. His younger daughter and her lover, however, have eavesdropped and change the papers. The other daughter also discovers the trouble and tells her father that she'll marry the count to save his honor. At the climax, the frustrated count snatches the envelope and hurries away. He finds worthless papers in it. The story outrages human probability, common sense and even decency. There were some very uncritical members of the audience who seemed to like it. It is well photographed. The scenes m several instances are very pretty. - The Moving Picture World, February 10, 1912


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