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The Wrath of Osaka (1913)

Kobe, the father of Miro, is a grouch. Miro is beloved of Osaka, a poor man, whose suit is rudely rejected by Kobe, who, in a drunken orgy, offers his daughter to the highest bidder among ... See full summary »

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Cast

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Miro
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Kobe - Miro's Father
Stephen Smith
Doris Thompson ...
Suzi (as Mrs. William V. Ranous)
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Storyline

Kobe, the father of Miro, is a grouch. Miro is beloved of Osaka, a poor man, whose suit is rudely rejected by Kobe, who, in a drunken orgy, offers his daughter to the highest bidder among his friends. She is won by Okyto, a rich profligate, who takes her away with him to his summer palace, refusing to allow even her faithful servant, Suzi, to accompany her. Suzi tells Osaka of the marriage, and when he attempts to speak with her, he is rudely beaten off by Okyto's attendants. Osaka then goes' to Kobe and tells him that if harm comes to his daughter Miro, his life shall pay the forfeit. After reaching the palace with her husband, Okyto, Miro is treated shamefully. On one occasion, she is rudely pushed aside in favor of geisha girl. Miro flees into the garden and drops unconscious, where she is found by Suzi. Okyto presently seeks her and again handles her roughly. Osaka sees him, forces his way into the palace grounds, approaches him and a terrific struggle takes place between the two ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Drama | Short

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8 May 1913 (USA)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Trivia

According to Kevin Brownlow, this film and Jack's Chrysanthemum (1913) were directed by James Young and shot on location near Yokohama, Japan. See more »

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User Reviews

Maurice Costello looks anything but Japanese
4 September 2017 | by See all my reviews

A story by Gene Mullin, taken in Japan by the traveling Vitagraph company. It is intended to be a tragedy, but, at least in the early scenes, it fails of being tragic, because of its players who, as Japanese, are comical. Maurice Costello looks anything but Japanese in his costume, and there was some laughter. The women are passable Japs, but none of the men get by. The backgrounds are as interesting as could be, but the picture, as a dramatic offering, is weak. - The Moving Picture World, May 24, 1913


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