A Bear Named Winnie (2004) - News Poster

(2004 TV Movie)

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Film Review: ‘Goodbye Christopher Robin’

Film Review: ‘Goodbye Christopher Robin’
There was no such thing as a “Pooh” until A.A. Milne made it so, although walking, talking teddy bear Winnie’s companion, Christopher Robin, wasn’t just some character the English novelist invented, but a boy based on Milne’s own son, who grew up to resent how the success of “Winnie-the-Pooh” wrecked his childhood. That’s just one of the behind-the-scenes revelations the predictably handsome, predictably stuffy literary biopic “Goodbye Christopher Robin” has in store for those who adore Milne’s novels — consistently voted among the most popular kidlit creations of all time — but who haven’t necessarily heard how they came to be.

Milne wouldn’t be the first teller of children’s stories to be something of a brute when it came to dealing with the little nippers in person (“Alice” creator Charles Dodgson also comes to mind), although the movie doesn’t feel unreasonably tough in the way it holds Milne accountable for
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Brett Ratner Making Winnie the Pooh Origin Story

Brett Ratner's RatPac Entertainment has acquired movie rights to a new picture book, called "Finding Winnie," written by Lindsay Mattick, the great-granddaughter of Lieutenant Harry Colebourn, who owned a bear that would become the inspiration for Winnie the Pooh. The book centers on how Colebourn bought an orphaned bear cub for $20 in Ontario as he was about to leave for duty in Europe during World War I. He nicknamed the cub "Winnie" after his hometown of Winnipeg and took her to Europe, where she became the unofficial mascot of a regiment in England. While Colebourn served in France, he kept Winnie at the London Zoo and eventually donated her to the zoo. AA Milne eventually created the character Winnie the Pooh, after his son, Christopher Robin Milne, named his teddy bear after the bear who he often saw at the zoo. A 2004 TV movie based on the story, "A Bear Named Winnie,
See full article at Worst Previews »

Winnie the Pooh Gets An Origin Story

"Winnie the Pooh" gets a "Batman Begins" style reboot? Not quite.

Brett Ratner's RatPac Entertainment has scored the film rights to Lindsay Mattick and Sophie Blackall's upcoming book "Finding Winnie" with plans for a feature adaptation.

Mattick's great-grandfather, Harry Colebourn, bought an orphaned bear cub in Ontario as he was about to be posted to Europe during Wwi. Nicknaming the animal Winnie because Colebourn came from Winnipeg, he took the cub to England where she served as the mascot for his regiment.

Colebourn was posted to France, so he left her in the care of London Zoo. It's there that author A. A. Milne encountered her and came up with the classic character. Ratner will produce the story, though the project is in very early stages at present.

A TV movie adaptation of the story entitled "A Bear Named Winnie" was made in 2004 and starred Michael Fassbender as Colebourn
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Winnie the Pooh Origin Story Developing at RatPac

The story of the bear that the Winnie the Pooh character was named for is in development at RatPac Entertainment.

The company has acquired movie rights to the forthcoming picture book “Finding Winnie,” written by Lindsay Mattick and illustrated by Sophie Blackall.

RatPac Entertainment’s John Cheng and Agustine Calderon will oversee “Finding Winnie” for RatPac.

The book centers on how Lieutenant Harry Colebourn – Mattick’s great-grandfather – bought an orphaned bear cub for $20 in Ontario as he was about to leave for duty in Europe during World War I.

Colebourn nicknamed the cub “Winnie” after his hometown of Winnipeg and took her to Europe, where she became the unofficial mascot of a regiment in England. While Coleburn served in France, he kept Winnie at the London Zoo and eventually donated her to the zoo.

The bear served as inspiration for A.A. Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh character since his son, Christopher Robin Milne,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

[Now Streaming] Your ‘Harry Potter,’ ‘Winnie the Pooh’ & ‘Tabloid’ Alternatives

Each week within this column we strive to pair the latest in theatrical releases to the worthwhile titles currently available on Netflix Instant Watch.

It’s a thrilling week in movies! Hordes of Potterheads will mob theaters at midnight to see the much-anticipated Battle of Hogwarts, while a silly old bear tumbles back with a new tale from the Hundred Acre Wood, and a master documentarian brings a twisted true tale to light. To take the excitement home, screen this selection of streaming features from the comfort of your couch.



Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2

In the final film of the world-thrilling film series, The Boy Who Lived (Daniel Radcliffe) prepares for the final showdown with He Who Must Not Be Named (Ralph Fiennes). But come on, you knew that! Emma Watson, Rupert Grint and Alan Rickman co-star.

For more tales of magic and mayhem, try this
See full article at The Film Stage »

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