Rize (2005) - News Poster

(2005)

News

Netflix Picks Up 12 New Anime Series Projects and Godzilla Movie; Watch Some Trailers!

Netflix is going all in on anime as they add the eagerly anticipated Godzilla movie and 12 other projects to their slate of upcoming programming. Deadline says in addition to the series the network is also overseeing the development of Cannon Busters, Devilman Crybaby, B: The Beginning, and Knights Of The Zodiac: Saint Seiya just to name a few.

The Godzilla and Saint Seiya grabs really show that Netflix is working to grab their Western audience who loves anime, but with competitors like Crunchyroll and Funimation (who was recently bought by Sony) in the mix, who knows if they'll be able to compete on that front. Time will tell, but the addition of so many projects seems promising for the future of anime on the platform.

Below you'll find details photos and some trailer for the anime projects that Netflix has picked up!

Cannon Busters

Created, directed and executive produced
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Film Review: ‘Kiki’

Film Review: ‘Kiki’
It takes balls to come out as gay or transgender in New York City today, especially for teens of color — which is exactly what the so-called “Kiki” scene sprung up to provide. A quarter century after “Paris Is Burning,” the fire still rages with Lgbtq youth, as seen in Sara Jordeno’s brash and empowering feature debut, which celebrates how the Big Apple’s ballroom scene — that vibrant subculture of competitive dance-offs from which “vogueing” was born — has inspired a new generation. Encouragingly enough, these obstreperous African-American teens are carrying the torch for more than just wild drag performances (if anything, the documentary is disappointingly light on actual ball footage); they have also advanced the fight for visibility, equality and all-around inclusion. In a context where “face” matters, “Kiki” introduces a number that audiences won’t soon forget.

Faced with daunting HIV infection statistics that suggest as many as three
See full article at Variety - Film News »

David Lachapelle: 'Fashion, beauty and glamour are the mark of civilisation'

For years David Lachapelle was the go-to photographer for the world's biggest stars. But in 2006 he ditched fashion for fine art. As an exhibition of his work opens in London, he talks to Elizabeth Day about death, divas and decadence

David Lachapelle is running late. Though the term "running" doesn't quite describe it. "He's sleeping," says one of Lachapelle's assistants, peering at me languidly through those ironic-retro spectacles that seem to be de rigueur for arty types. "People are working on it." Working on what, I wonder? Getting him out of his pyjamas?

The assistant explains that Lachapelle flew in from his home on the Hawaiian island of Maui yesterday and is still jet-lagged. This is why we've had to change the interview location at the last minute and congregate in the lobby of a chintzy five-star hotel just off Sloane Square in London. Besides, he's not that used to
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Super Shorts: Sparrow Songs

Sometimes, when it comes to art, you have to give yourself deadlines. The collaborators behind Sparrow Songs, cinematographer Michael Totten (who worked on the beautiful-looking doc Rize) and Alex Jablonski (whose short, Blue Boy, played at the 2009 Tribeca Film Festival), have used this principle to produce one short documentary a month. It's a fascinating project, and it's taken them around America, from a donut shop to porn star karaoke to the circus to minor league ball, with every scenario shot in the most elegant and beautiful way by Totten's camera. As disparate as the topics may be, the shorts are all united in their humanity and gentleness, the respect and empathy that they show towards each subject. Their latest short, The Farm, would make a nice starter for Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck's Sugar - both films take a hard look at what it takes to be a minor league baseball player,
See full article at Tribeca Film »

Caravaggio: how he influenced my art | feature

From Martin Scorsese to Peter Doig, film-makers, photographers and artists explain how Caravaggio's prophetically cinematic paintings inspired them

David Lachapelle – Photographer and film director

Caravaggio is often called the most modern of the old masters – there's a newness, a contemporary feel to his work that painting prior to him just didn't have. It's like when [fashion designer Alexander] McQueen came on the scene, everything else [in the fashion world] suddenly looked old. Caravaggio used light like a photographer and his pictures are cropped like photographs. One that sticks in my mind is Boy Bitten By a Lizard. That's a beautiful example of the one-source light that we identify Caravaggio with, that he pioneered, but it's also a wonderful captured moment, this boy's sort of feminine reaction to the lizard's bite. It's a photograph before photography.

The flower in the boy's hair and the blouse coming off his shoulders I think signify that the boy is a male prostitute.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

1st Look: Planet B-Boy Poster

[/link]'s Rize - a docu on the dance movement called 'Clowning' that had only a niche following, Planet B-Boy looks at a retro (we are talking 80's here folks) revamped form of breaking moves that has a surprising global reach. Premiered at the past Tribeca, independent NY-based production house Elephant Eye Films are continuing the grassroots campaign - handling distribution of Benson Lee's four corner of the globes documentary with a nationwide release on March 21, 2008. We've got your first look at the poster image below (click on it for a larger version) and as usual have included the synopsis for your use... A vibrant and infectious look at the global resurgence of break-dancing, Planet B-boy weaves spectacular dance footage with poignant personal stories. From the outskirts of Paris to the suburbs of Seoul, Korea, Lee’s film deftly spotlights how young men of such
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

'Penguins' on docu Oscar short list

'Penguins' on docu Oscar short list
The indie blockbuster March of the Penguins is among the 15 documentaries that have made the cut for consideration for the best feature documentary Oscar at the 78th annual Academy Awards. The short-listed candidates -- drawn from 82 films that were eligible -- include After Innocence, The Boys of Baraka, Darwin's Nightmare, The Devil and Daniel Johnston, Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, Favela Rising, Mad Hot Ballroom, March of the Penguins, Murderball, Occupation: Dreamland, On Native Soil: The Documentary of the 9/11 Commission Report, Rize, Street Fight, 39 Pounds of Love and Unknown White Male, the Academy said Tuesday. Eligible documentaries were screened by the documentary branch screening committee, made up of members of the branch who serve on a volunteer basis. The above films were chosen after a preliminary round of screenings. The nominated films will be announced along with nominations in 24 other categories on Jan. 31. The Academy Awards will be presented March 5 at the Kodak Theatre at Hollywood & Highland, televised live by ABC.

'Penguins' on docu Oscar short list

The indie blockbuster March of the Penguins is among the 15 documentaries that have made the cut for consideration for the best feature documentary Oscar at the 78th annual Academy Awards. The short-listed candidates -- drawn from 82 films that were eligible -- include After Innocence, The Boys of Baraka, Darwin's Nightmare, The Devil and Daniel Johnston, Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room, Favela Rising, Mad Hot Ballroom, March of the Penguins, Murderball, Occupation: Dreamland, On Native Soil: The Documentary of the 9/11 Commission Report, Rize, Street Fight, 39 Pounds of Love and Unknown White Male, the Academy said Tuesday. Eligible documentaries were screened by the documentary branch screening committee, made up of members of the branch who serve on a volunteer basis. The above films were chosen after a preliminary round of screenings. The nominated films will be announced along with nominations in 24 other categories on Jan. 31. The Academy Awards will be presented March 5 at the Kodak Theatre at Hollywood & Highland, televised live by ABC.

Rize

Rize
An exhilarating portrait of a groundbreaking, up-from-the-L.A.-streets strain of athleticism as performance art, Rize would make a provocative companion piece to skateboard documentary Dogtown and Z-Boys. In contrast to the latter's retrospective look at the creation of a cutting-edge, beach-infused sensibility, stylemaker David LaChapelle's first docu feature, centering on L.A.'s more landlocked stretches, pulses with an of-the-moment urgency. Strong reviews and word-of-mouth should make it one of the best-performing nonfiction films of the year.

Rize looks at practitioners of rubber-limbed, freestyle clown dancing and its fiercer spinoff, krumping, which burst forth in predominantly black, low-income areas of South Central such as Watts, Inglewood and Compton. Clown dancing arose in response to the Rodney King riots of '92, when a one-time drug dealer who had discovered his inner entertainer turned himself into Tommy the Clown, whose birthday parties for kids and Hip-Hop Clown Academy spawned a generation of clown dancers and krumpers. With his rainbow wig and painted face, Tommy, a father figure to kids in need, turns the Bozo template into an unlikely expression of dignity.

The dancers LaChapelle profiles testify to the surrogate-family aspect of dance groups, which number upward of 50 and provide a vital alternative to gangs. That's a lot to offer in economically ravaged neighborhoods where there are no after-school arts programs. Exuberant in their wild beauty and physics-defying speed, clown dancing and the harder-edged krumping give form to a self-affirming, primal fury. One dancer speaks of krump as innate, and in an extraordinary sequence LaChapelle intercuts the L.A. performers with scenes of strikingly similar African tribal dance rituals.

Fashion photographer/music video director LaChapelle closes Rize by indulging in a redundant dance sequence that, however visually impressive, zaps some of the film's cumulative force. And after some of the subjects have proclaimed their determination to resist commercial, MTV-style co-optation, it feels antithetical.

The time would have been better spent listening to the dancers -- like 18-year-old Swoop, who started clown dancing at 12 and says he would have been a "bad person" without it. Or the eloquent Dragon, whose story is a testament to inner strength and resilience. Given their landscape of deprivation, addiction, incarceration and violence, anything these spirited survivors have to say is well worth hearing.

Rize

Rize
An exhilarating portrait of a groundbreaking, up-from-the-L.A.-streets strain of athleticism as performance art, Rize would make a provocative companion piece to skateboard documentary Dogtown and Z-Boys. In contrast to the latter's retrospective look at the creation of a cutting-edge, beach-infused sensibility, stylemaker David LaChapelle's first docu feature, centering on L.A.'s more landlocked stretches, pulses with an of-the-moment urgency. Strong reviews and word-of-mouth should make it one of the best-performing nonfiction films of the year.

Rize looks at practitioners of rubber-limbed, freestyle clown dancing and its fiercer spinoff, krumping, which burst forth in predominantly black, low-income areas of South Central such as Watts, Inglewood and Compton. Clown dancing arose in response to the Rodney King riots of '92, when a one-time drug dealer who had discovered his inner entertainer turned himself into Tommy the Clown, whose birthday parties for kids and Hip-Hop Clown Academy spawned a generation of clown dancers and krumpers. With his rainbow wig and painted face, Tommy, a father figure to kids in need, turns the Bozo template into an unlikely expression of dignity.

The dancers LaChapelle profiles testify to the surrogate-family aspect of dance groups, which number upward of 50 and provide a vital alternative to gangs. That's a lot to offer in economically ravaged neighborhoods where there are no after-school arts programs. Exuberant in their wild beauty and physics-defying speed, clown dancing and the harder-edged krumping give form to a self-affirming, primal fury. One dancer speaks of krump as innate, and in an extraordinary sequence LaChapelle intercuts the L.A. performers with scenes of strikingly similar African tribal dance rituals.

Fashion photographer/music video director LaChapelle closes Rize by indulging in a redundant dance sequence that, however visually impressive, zaps some of the film's cumulative force. And after some of the subjects have proclaimed their determination to resist commercial, MTV-style co-optation, it feels antithetical.

The time would have been better spent listening to the dancers -- like 18-year-old Swoop, who started clown dancing at 12 and says he would have been a "bad person" without it. Or the eloquent Dragon, whose story is a testament to inner strength and resilience. Given their landscape of deprivation, addiction, incarceration and violence, anything these spirited survivors have to say is well worth hearing.

IFP plans outdoor summer film series

IFP is set to program an outdoor film series at Rockefeller Center in midtown this summer, it was announced Thursday. The program, "Drive-In Movies at the Rock" will run from June 14-17 and screen Lions Gate's Rize and IFC Films' The Baxter prior to their theatrical release. It is the second year the series has run. The slate also includes films still seeking distribution: the Rosanna Arquette documentary All We Are Saying and the doc Show Business. The film Alchemy, which is also seeking distribution, will be screened on June 18 outside of the branded slate. Cast and filmmakers from each film (including Arquette and Baxter director Michael Showalter) are scheduled to introduce each screening. "Drive-In Movies at the Rock" is presented by Target and sponsored by Bank of America.

Lions Gate leads second buying wave

Lions Gate leads second buying wave
PARK CITY -- With the Sundance Film Festival's first, frenzied weekend over, no deal the magnitude of the $16 million Hustle & Flow sale to Paramount/MTV Films appears in sight, but acquisitions activity is heating up. On Monday, Lions Gate Films paid slightly less than $1 million to purchase worldwide rights to Rize, David LaChapelle's dance documentary about the krump craze in South Central Los Angeles. Paramount Pictures Classics, Palm Pictures and the Samuel Goldwyn Films chased the energetic picture, but Lions Gate won the prize. "This film has a unique voice and brilliantly captures the spirit of this community," Lions Gate Films Releasing president Tom Ortenberg said. "We plan to work hard to bring this film to audiences across the country."

'Rize' beaming to fest for peak performance

'Rize' beaming to fest for peak performance
In a worldwide first, a select audience at the Sundance Film Festival on Saturday will have the opportunity to watch a movie streamed over a high-speed wireless link. Intel, working with Alavarion and Mountain Wireless, chose David LaChapelle's new feature-length documentary Rize to demonstrate the potential of the technology known as WiMax. Rize has been digitized for the occasion. Intel will stream the movie from its facilities in Oregon over the Internet to Salt Lake City. From there, LaChapelle's documentary will be sent over a wireless microwave network to Park City and then to the Empire Lodge at Deer Valley -- 12,000 feet up in the mountains. Audiences at that venue will see Rize on a full-size cinema screen.

See also

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