5.9/10
11
1 user 1 critic

Harlem Blues (2003)

R | | Drama | Video 14 January 2003
When Ishmael is released from prison, he is forced to return to the life on the streets that he thought he had left behind. Determined to survive, he trains as a professional fighter, and ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Steven Beckford ...
Officer Vasko
Yvonne Delano ...
Baby Dee
Andy Diaz ...
Puma
Deena Diaz ...
Miriam
Magic Juan ...
Bo
Matt Ostroff ...
Ishmael Malone
Chelsi Ruiz ...
Daughter
Sadat X ...
Bumpy
...
Trainer
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Storyline

When Ishmael is released from prison, he is forced to return to the life on the streets that he thought he had left behind. Determined to survive, he trains as a professional fighter, and struggles to stay out of the world of gangs, drugs and turf war. Written by Andy Diaz

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These streets are taken

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, some violence and brief drug content
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Release Date:

14 January 2003 (USA)  »

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User Reviews

Great Film. A must see for independent filmmakers!
22 February 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This movie was an interesting look at the pitfalls that a kid can face growing up in uptown Manhattan. One catches a glimpse of the hard knock life through the eyes of a young boxer, ex-felon punk who is struggling to put his life in order after doing time, and try to make things go right in his new life when everything around him seems to push him in the wrong direction. Idealism and unfocused dreams, as well as unrealistic expectations and bad decisions about love seem to plague the hero and send him ultimately to desperate actions. Some of the highlights of the movie besides acting are some interesting edits and music. Although this seems to be independent director Andy Diaz's first attempt at film making, one can see he has already begun to develop a style all his own and one would hope to see future releases that show this sort of realism and intelligent insight into life and hard times of life in New York. Bravo.


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