Needs 5 Ratings

A Western Prince Charming (1912)

Mrs. Hindemiller, a widow with five young children, the eldest of whom, Lena, is only eleven years old, finds that the struggle to keep the wolf from the door is becoming too great and ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
Bliss Milford ...
Mrs. Hindemiller
Edna Hammel ...
Lena Hindemiller - the Oldest Child (as Edna May Hammel)
...
Fritz - the Stage Driver
Louise Sydmeth ...
Mrs. Maloney - Hotel Operator
...
Robert Emmett Tansey ...
Little Tommy (as Robert Tansey)
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Storyline

Mrs. Hindemiller, a widow with five young children, the eldest of whom, Lena, is only eleven years old, finds that the struggle to keep the wolf from the door is becoming too great and decides to send Lena into service. To this end she arranges to send her to Mrs. Maloney who runs the Quarry Hotel. Lena is placed in charge of Fritz, the old stage driver and, amid the tears of her family, is whirled away to her new home, tightly clasping to her breast her one treasure, a thumb-worn copy of Grimm's Fairy Tales. Arrived at the Quarry Hotel, Lena is at once put to work. From daylight until long after dark Mrs. Maloney drives her from task to task. The hard work, the rough men and Mrs. Maloney's constant abuse, do not tend to cure little Lena of her home-sickness. Her only consolation is her book of fairy tales, which she keeps hidden under her cot in the garret. Here, after her day's work, she manages to steal a few sweet moments poring over the trials of poor Cinderella and the Prince. ... Written by Moving Picture World synopsis

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Genres:

Drama | Short

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Release Date:

25 May 1912 (USA)  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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User Reviews

It awakens our sympathy for a little girl
22 November 2016 | by (Chicago) – See all my reviews

This is from one of O. Henry's stories and one that has been very widely read; for it appeared in the syndicated, or "patent insides" of thousands of little country weeklies. Perhaps the stories of no other man so readily serve as moving picture scenarios; one might almost suspect that O. Henry learned to write in the nickelodeons. Perhaps it is because his appeal, being distinctly to the unsophisticated part of us, parallels the appeal of the most popular pictures. This picture surely will be popular. It awakens our sympathy for a little girl, drudging as help in a rough Western boarding house, and then satisfies the child's dream of romance for us. In doing this, he makes use of nothing that is not found in common, ordinary life. It is a picture with cowboys in it; but by no means a cowboy picture. It is a comedy; but not one that will make many laughs. Its effect is to warm the heart with sympathy. It is the kind of picture that very unobtrusively stirs a feeling that, by suggesting a wide human bond of sympathy, consoles. The whole cast acts excellently and the photography and every other element in the picture is praiseworthy. - The Moving Picture World, June 8, 1912


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