6.4/10
19,078
107 user 118 critic

Factory Girl (2006)

Based on the rise and fall of socialite Edie Sedgwick, concentrating on her relationships with Andy Warhol and a folk singer.

Writers:

(screenplay), (story) | 2 more credits »
Reviews
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4,373 ( 883)

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1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Storyline

A beautiful, wealthy young party girl drops out of Radcliffe in 1965 and heads to New York to become Holly Golightly. When she meets a hungry young artist named Andy Warhol, he promises to make her the star she always wanted to be. And like a super nova she explodes on the New York scene only to find herself slowly lose grip on reality... Written by Richard Golub

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Fame. The Spotlight. The Scandal. The Party's About To Begin. See more »

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for pervasive drug use, strong sexual content, nudity and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

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Release Date:

16 February 2007 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Fábrica de sueños  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$7,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$195,698 (USA) (9 February 2007)

Gross:

$1,654,367 (USA) (16 March 2007)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(unrated)

Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Mary-Kate Olsen's first project without her sister, Ashley Olsen. She appears in a party scene, in the background, but her scenes were deleted from the final cut. See more »

Goofs

Edie Sedgwick's opening lines state that her "great-great-great-great uncle was a signer of the Declaration of Independence...". It was in fact her great-great-great uncle, William Ellery who was the signatory of the United States Declaration of Independence in 1776. See more »

Quotes

Andy Warhol: I think I'll quit my painting, and... just make Edie a big star.
See more »

Connections

References Popeye the Sailor (1960) See more »

Soundtracks

Fever
Written by Eddie Cooley and Otis Blackwell (as John Davenport)
Performed by The McCoys
Courtesy of Epic Records
By Arrangement with Sony BMG Music Entertainment
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Superficial superstars
20 August 2009 | by (London) – See all my reviews

It's not a documentary.

Just in case you read some of the rather hysterical comments and garner the impression that it's supposed to be about real people, it's not. Andy Warhol was never a real person, just a performance.

Guy Pearce presents Andy Warhol as the superficial creature he undoubtedly was. The original art-as-business creator, the very God at whose altar such modern day charlatans as Damien Hirst worship. Pearce's performance is riveting, his Andy Warhol is as empty as his crapulous art; just a two-dimensional diagram of someone who leaves no shadow. A cartoon.

Sienna Miller's performance as Edie Sedgewick is the best thing she's ever done. Caught in the strobe lights of Warhol's strangely sterile world of non-sexual sex and sofas still in their plastic wrappers, Edie becomes the focus of his short attention span for a while. She flashes across the screen like a speeded up Holly Golighty, while Warhol's voyeuristic viewfinder traps her in it's leering stare. The camera loves her and so does Warhol. But we know it's going to end in tears.

Nothing in the movie has much depth, none of the characters are developed beyond what we already know about them and the whole sixties New York scene is represented by a series of iconic "things". The Chelsea Hotel, the Velvet Underground, a soundtrack of songs that sound right but which actually don't fit at all. For instance, "Leavin' here" by The Birds, a British group in which Ronnie Wood was the guitarist, was recorded in 1966 but was never released in America. However, there it is on the soundtrack being played in the factory sometime in 1965.

But no matter.

The movie pretty much captures the shallow, transient and utterly facile world of Warhol in the sixties and in another way it sums up the emptiness and tragedy of the Hollywood dream machine too. But it doesn't ask any deep questions nor does it pretend to be something it's not. It's entertaining and worth watching for two very good performances by Guy Pearce and Sienna Miller.

It's not art, it's just a movie, albeit a superficial one.


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