6.4/10
18,760
106 user 116 critic

Factory Girl (2006)

Based on the rise and fall of socialite Edie Sedgwick, concentrating on her relationships with Andy Warhol and a folk singer.

Writers:

(screenplay), (story) | 2 more credits »

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From $0.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Musician
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Storyline

A beautiful, wealthy young party girl drops out of Radcliffe in 1965 and heads to New York to become Holly Golightly. When she meets a hungry young artist named Andy Warhol, he promises to make her the star she always wanted to be. And like a super nova she explodes on the New York scene only to find herself slowly lose grip on reality... Written by Richard Golub

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

When Andy met Edie, life imitated art. See more »

Genres:

Biography | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for pervasive drug use, strong sexual content, nudity and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

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Release Date:

16 February 2007 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Fábrica de sueños  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$7,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$195,698 (USA) (9 February 2007)

Gross:

$1,654,367 (USA) (16 March 2007)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(unrated)

Sound Mix:

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Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Bob Dylan threatened to sue the producers for defamation, claiming that the film portrayed him as responsible for Edie Sedgwick's death. Thus, any mention of Dylan was omitted from the script and Hayden Christensen is called Billy Quinn in dialogue and billed in the credits only as "Musician." See more »

Goofs

When Sam first points out Edie Sedgwick to Andy Warhol, Gerard Malanga stands between Sam and Andy with a video camera. In the next shot, Gerard is standing right in front of Edie videotaping her. A couple of shots later you see Gerard standing between Sam and Andy again. See more »

Quotes

Syd Pepperman: [regarding Edie] What do you want me to do?
Billy Quinn: I dunno. See if she needs anything...
[walks away]
Billy Quinn: I'd help her if I could.
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Soundtracks

Le Responsable
Written by Jacques Lanzmann and Jacques Dutronc
Performed by Jacques Dutronc
Courtesy of Sony BMG Music Entertainment France
By Arrangement with Sony BMG Music Entertainment
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
You're the Boss, Applesauce
11 February 2007 | by (Dallas, Texas) – See all my reviews

Greetings again from the darkness. Andy Warhol and The Factory poses quite the challenge to any filmmaker attempting to capture the look, feel and pain of that world unto itself. Director George Hickenlooper's best work has been "Mayor of Sunset Strip" and "Dogtown", neither of which drew much of an audience. "Factory Girl" probably has little hope of attracting much attention from movie-goers as well.

While we do spend a good portion of the film in The Factory, this is more the tragic story of Edie, rather than an insightful look at Warhol's art. Edie was really the first to make being famous a job ... think Paris Hilton today. No real talent herself, her name, family money and looks got her inside the art world and exceptionally close to Warhol. Of course, those things were not enough to carve out any real territory and the ending, while tragic, is not at all surprising.

The film is overly choppy in attempting to find the right look and feel and yet with Jagger, Velvet Underground and the Dylanesque Hayden Christensen, the importance and power of music for this era is clearly established. Aussie Guy Pearce does a nice impersonation of Warhol and Jimmy Fallon has his first serious role. Other support comes from Mena Suvari as Edie's friend, Beth Grant as Warhol's mom, Don Novello (Father Guido from early SNL), and Illeana Douglas as Diana Vreeland.

By far the best part of this project is the performance of Sienna Miller as Edie Sedgwick. Even her vocal cadence is remarkable. The physical and emotional turmoil seems very real as Edie goes from top of world to desperation for life. Ms. Miller will at some point break out and become the film star she is destined to become. That role has just not quite happened yet. It could be later this year when she re-teams with her "Layer Cake" director. Let's hope so. Her talent is undeniable and although it is a pleasure to see her performance as Edie, she deserves a much wider audience.

The weakness of the film is best shown by the interviews over the closing credits. Attempting to explain what we had just watched is a pure indication that the job had not been done well.


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