...So Goes the Nation (2006) - News Poster

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IFC Films to Stream Content Through Netflix

  • MovieWeb
In a move designed to increase the reach of independent cinema, IFC Entertainment, one of the leading distributors of independent and foreign films, and Netflix, the world's largest online movie rental service, today announced a partnership that gives Netflix U.S. rights to 53 unique titles from IFC Entertainment. Through this agreement select titles from IFC Entertainment's eclectic library of independent films will become available to be streamed instantly to televisions and computers via the Netflix service. The deal was announced jointly by Lisa Schwartz, executive vice president for IFC Entertainment, and Robert Kyncl, vice president of content acquisition for Netflix.

The partnership gives Netflix members on an unlimited plan the opportunity to instantly watch the newly acquired films on their computers or TVs through a range of Netflix ready devices. Those devices include Netflix ready Blu-ray disc players and new Internet TVs from LG Electronics; Blu-ray disc players from Samsung
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So Goes the Nation

IFC First Take

NEW YORK -- While there has been no recent shortage of politically themed documentaries, this effort from co-directors James D. Stern and Adam Del Deo distinguishes itself with its clearheaded approach and (mostly) lack of bias. An examination of the 2004 presidential election centering on the controversial race in Ohio, So Goes the Nation is particularly valuable for its insightful and ultimately depressing portrait of political machinations.

Not since The War Room has a film gone into such depth as to the nuts and bolts of a political campaign. Incorporating interviews with campaign strategists from both sides, it examines the contrasting methods of the Democrats and the Republicans, with the latter, not surprisingly, coming out far ahead in terms of effectiveness.

The central figures interviewed include Edward Gillespie and Terry McAuliffe (chairmen of the Republican and Democratic national committees, respectively), Ken Mehlman and Mary Beth Cahill (President Bush and John Kerry's respective campaign managers), Matthew Dowd and Tad Devine (their campaign strategists), Mark McKinnon (Bush's media strategist) and Paul Begala (senior Democrat adviser).

But the film also looks at various unknown figures in the campaign, including several of the thousands of volunteers on both sides whose work would figure so prominently in the election.

There is one thing that both sides clearly agree on: The Republicans ran the superior campaign. While Bush was playing to his strengths and mustering support from his own base, Kerry's team was looking to appeal to the swing voter, with little success.

The contrasting messages of the two candidates are scrutinized as well. Bush's team emphasized the war on terrorism above all else, to great effect. Meanwhile Kerry, according to Begala, ineffectively tried to cover all bases with a strategy awkwardly shortened to JHOS (jobs, health, oil and security).

The film vividly and credibly makes the sad case that current presidential elections are decided not so much on the basis of the issues involved or the comparative attributes of the candidates, but rather by which party has the best marketing team.

'Journals' makes point as Toronto's fest opener

'Journals' makes point as Toronto's fest opener
TORONTO -- The Toronto International Film Festival got off to a brave start Thursday night with the kickoff gala screening of The Journals of Knud Rasmussen, a Inuktitut- and Danish-language drama about Canada's Inuit people being stripped of their traditions by Christianity. Business also got under way as IFC First Take announced it has picked up all North American distribution rights to ... So Goes the Nation, a documentary uncovering election manipulation in Ohio during the 2004 U.S. presidential race. Nation is scheduled to have its world premiere at the festival Thursday. At the fest's opening, the strains of native throat-singing and drum-beating opened the proceedings at Roy Thomson Hall as co-directors Zacharias Kunuk and Norman Cohn introduced a cast of unknown Inuit actors to about 4,000 guests.

'Journals' makes point as Toronto's fest opener

'Journals' makes point as Toronto's fest opener
TORONTO -- The Toronto International Film Festival got off to a brave start Thursday night with the kickoff gala screening of The Journals of Knud Rasmussen, a Inuktitut- and Danish-language drama about Canada's Inuit people being stripped of their traditions by Christianity. Business also got under way as IFC First Take announced it has picked up all North American distribution rights to ... So Goes the Nation, a documentary uncovering election manipulation in Ohio during the 2004 U.S. presidential race. Nation is scheduled to have its world premiere at the festival Thursday. At the fest's opening, the strains of native throat-singing and drum-beating opened the proceedings at Roy Thomson Hall as co-directors Zacharias Kunuk and Norman Cohn introduced a cast of unknown Inuit actors to about 4,000 guests.

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