6.3/10
598
35 user 36 critic

Cavite (2005)

Not Rated | | Thriller | 12 March 2005 (USA)
Flying back to his home country, an American man is informed that his mother and sister have been kidnapped and will be killed if he doesn't comply with certain demands.

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
4 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Cast overview:
Ian Gamazon ...
Adam
Edwin Lagda ...
Running Man - Adam's Dad / Alleyway Victim
Edgar Tancangco ...
Adam's Father
Norma Tancangco ...
Adam's Mother
Quynn Ton ...
Little Sister
Mariza Levario ...
Arguing Voice (voice)
Neill Dela Llana ...
Arguing Voice / Alleyway Assassin
Dominique Gonzalez ...
Dana
Ryan Lagda ...
Little Boy Thief / Kidnapped Kid
Nestor B. Casilis ...
Terrorist with Gun
Rico V. Lagda ...
Kidnapped Kid
Robert Sanque ...
Thug in Bathroom
Joven F. Abrenica ...
Thug in Bathroom
Solita R. Nadal ...
Woman on Cell Phone
Edit

Storyline

Adam, a security guard, travels from California to the Philippines, his native land, for his father's funeral. He arrives in Manila. As he waits, a phone rings in his backpack; he answers it, and a male voice tells him that his mother and sister are captives and will be killed if Adam doesn't cooperate. Over the next hour, the voice sends Adam by bus, taxi, motorized tricycle, and on foot through an urban landscape of busy streets, cramped apartments, a fetid squatters' camp, a bank, a cockfighting arena, and a church. Adam's conversations with the voice cover murder, Islam, jihad, rebellion in Mindanao, and his family. What is it Adam will be commanded to do? Will he acquiesce? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Deliver unspeakable terror or lose everyone you love...

Genres:

Thriller

Certificate:

Not Rated
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

|

Language:

| |

Release Date:

12 March 2005 (USA)  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Budget:

$7,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$16,124 (USA) (26 May 2006)

Gross:

$70,071 (USA) (4 August 2006)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Color:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Featured in 2006 Independent Spirit Awards (2006) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Terrorism gets personalized when a Filipino émigré must free his kidnapped family by using himself as the ransom!
12 March 2006 | by (NYC) – See all my reviews

Whatever superlative film-making skills co-director Ian Gamazon has attained over the years are quickly diminished by his average acting ability portraying 'Adam', the lead role of "Cavite." It also makes one wonder just how shallow the Filipino-American acting pool is in this country.

That said, this story is basically an extension of the Hollywood movie "Phone Booth" where a voice on the telephone forces the person on the other end to capitulate to their demands. Of course, "Cavite" takes it one step further by allowing the caller to be a well-known terrorist who not only has Adam's cellphone number but his victim's mother and sister too (after having already executed the father).

The cellphone also allows the action to travel which is technically more visually interesting than watching Colin Farrell sweat it out in one spot (a la "Phone Booth"). Although the voice on the phone purports to be Muslim terrorist leader, the political thriller elements are muted for the most part with the primary action revolving around the making audience watching Adam saunter his way through the city of Cavite (near Manila) on foot until he reaches the point of no return.

The terrorist's final request is the ultimate decision of the Adam's life: be a suicide bomber for the Abu Sayyaf and complete the mission or listen to the sound of your family being killed over the cellphone.

Of course, it'll cost you the price of admission to find out which choice he opted for, but for those not used to cinema verite this may be a hard film to watch. Almost all of the action is shot from either the Adam's POV (self-held camera) or the POV of the cameraman (also hand-held) gamely following behind him. Not for all tastes, but this low-budgeter shows you don't have to have millions of dollars to create suspense, but a better lead actor would have been worth a fortune.


12 of 16 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?