7.6/10
195,373
326 user 238 critic

Thank You for Smoking (2005)

R | | Comedy, Drama | 14 April 2006 (USA)
Satirical comedy follows the machinations of Big Tobacco's chief spokesman, Nick Naylor, who spins on behalf of cigarettes while trying to remain a role model for his twelve-year-old son.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (novel)
Reviews
Popularity
3,393 ( 505)

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ON DISC
Nominated for 2 Golden Globes. Another 12 wins & 30 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Eric Haberman ...
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Sue Maclean
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Ron Goode
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Kidnapper
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BR
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Teacher
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Alex Diaz ...
Kid #1
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Kid #2
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Kid #3 (as Courtney Burness)
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Kid #4 (as Jordan Orr)
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Storyline

The chief spokesperson and lobbyist Nick Naylor is the Vice-President of the Academy of Tobacco Studies. He is talented in speaking and spins argument to defend the cigarette industry in the most difficult situations. His best friends are Polly Bailey that works in the Moderation Council in alcohol business, and Bobby Jay Bliss of the gun business own advisory group SAFETY. They frequently meet each other in a bar and they self-entitle the Mod Squad a.k.a. Merchants of Death, disputing which industry has killed more people. Nick's greatest enemy is Vermont's Senator Ortolan Finistirre, who defends in the Senate the use a skull and crossed bones in the cigarette packs. Nick's son Joey Naylor lives with his mother, and has the chance to know his father in a business trip. When the ambitious reporter Heather Holloway betrays Nick disclosing confidences he had in bed with her, his life turns upside-down. But Nick is good in what he does for the mortgage. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

America is living in spin See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language and some sexual content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

14 April 2006 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Gracias por fumar  »

Box Office

Budget:

$6,500,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$262,923 (USA) (17 March 2006)

Gross:

$24,792,061 (USA) (8 September 2006)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

A few characters in this film have alliterative names: Nick Naylor, Heather Holloway, Bobby Jay Bliss, and Lorne Lutch (aka Marlboro Man). This is similar to the naming customs for certain comic book heroes, particularly the Marvel gang (Peter Parker, Bruce Banner, Reed Richards, etc.), which is a noteworthy coincidence because many of this movie's actors have been in comic book based movies or TV shows (including cartoon voices): Katie Holmes in Batman Begins (2005), Aaron Eckhart in that movie's sequel, The Dark Knight (2008), J.K. Simmons in three "Spider-Man" movies, Maria Bello in A History of Violence (2005), William H. Macy in Mystery Men (1999) and Superman: Where There's Smoke (1998) (which, as a further coincidence, has a title similar to this movie), Sam Elliott in Hulk (2003) and Ghost Rider (2007), Cameron Bright in X-Men: The Last Stand (2006), Melora Hardin in The Rocketeer (1991), Todd Louiso in Iron Man: Iron Man, on the Inside (1995), Marianne Muellerleile in Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman: The People vs. Lois Lane (1996), and in Kim Dickens in Fear the Walking Dead (2015). In addition, Marc Scizak (one of the ski masked men) had performed stunts in several such productions. See more »

Goofs

When Bobby Jay Bliss enters a National Guard recruiting office in 1971, modern cars are reflected in the door. See more »

Quotes

Bobby Jay Bliss: [in a restaurant] Did you know that you can fool the breathalizer test by chewing on activated charcoal tablets?
Polly Bailey: Well, maybe we should change our slogan to "If you must drink and drive, suck charcoal."
Nick Naylor: Won't the police ask about the charcoal in your mouth?
Bobby Jay Bliss: There's not a law against charcoal.
Polly BaileyNick Naylor: Yet.
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Crazy Credits

The opening credits are styled to appear as cigarette boxes. See more »

Connections

References Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939) See more »

Soundtracks

Greenback Dollar
Written by Hoyt Axton and Kenneth Ramsey (as Ken Ramsey)
Performed by The Kingston Trio
Courtesy of Capitol Records
Under license from EMI Film & Television Music
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

"Thank You" for a good satire!
25 March 2006 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

First of all, sorry for the cheesy title. I couldn't help myself. Second of all, "Thank You for Smoking" is, in fact, a darn good satire

  • one of the best I've seen since "Election". Aaron Eckhart holds the


picture together with a witty, charismatic performance as a tobacco lobbyist. The film is basically about his profession as he spins the news, pitches a movie idea, dodges a subpoena, has an affair with a reporter (Katie Holmes), tries to spend time with his son (Cameron Bright), and has lunch with an alcohol lobbyist (Maria Bello) and a firearms rep (David Koechner) - where they literally compare body counts. The performances are excellent across the board, from William H. Macy's crusading Senator to Rob Lowe's smirking Hollywood agent who struts around his office in a kimono. Even Adam Brody is enjoyable as Lowe's hyperactive assistant whose in-joke with a co-worker earned one of the biggest laughs of the movie.

The majority of the credit, however, needs to go to first-time feature director Jason (son of Ivan) Reitman. Adapting from Christopher Buckley's novel, Reitman has fashioned an enormously clever script, consistent and strong in character, yet not forgetting to be incredibly funny. The style is also perfect - brisk, light-hearted, with impeccable timing marred only by a tangental subplot including Sam Elliott that is, sadly, not very funny. Overall, however, the pace is fast enough where the laughs keep coming.

Reitman also does the unthinkable: he keeps the satire dark and funny to the very end. While most comedies stray blindly into the sentimental, "Thank You" avoids unnecessary emotional tripe and - thankfully - avoids sermonizing about the dangers of smoking or of the flaws of the political process. Eckhart's flawless performance and Reitman's wonderful screenplay anchor an uncommonly perceptive comedy, provided you take yours black. If you need a little cream and sugar, "Fun with Dick and Jane" might still be at the dollar theater.


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