IMDb > Grizzly Man (2005)
Grizzly Man
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Grizzly Man (2005) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 22 | slideshow) Videos (see all 5)
Grizzly Man -- A devastating and heartrending take on grizzly bear activists Timothy Treadwell and Amie Huguenard, who were killed in October of 2003 while living among grizzlies in Alaska.
Grizzly Man -- Clip: The Precipice of Death
Grizzly Man -- Werner Herzog discusses Wayne Coyne's reaction to a scene in Grizzly Man
Grizzly Man -- Clip: He's Lost Sight

Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   34,374 votes »
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Director:
Writer:
Werner Herzog (written by)
Contact:
View company contact information for Grizzly Man on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
27 October 2005 (Portugal) See more »
Tagline:
In nature, there are boundaries. See more »
Plot:
A devastating and heartrending take on grizzly bear activists Timothy Treadwell and Amie Huguenard, who were killed in October of 2003 while living among grizzlies in Alaska. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
21 wins & 8 nominations See more »
NewsDesk:
(312 articles)
Missi's Oscar Night Memoir
 (From FilmExperience. 15 December 2014, 10:33 AM, PST)

PopWatch Prescription: Movies the whole family can enjoy (really!)
 (From EW.com - PopWatch. 25 November 2014, 8:55 AM, PST)

The X Factor 2014: week six live blog as it happened
 (From The Guardian - TV News. 16 November 2014, 12:58 PM, PST)

User Reviews:
A life both tragic and silly See more (379 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Werner Herzog ... Himself / Narrator / Interviewer (voice)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Carol Dexter ... Herself - Treadwell's Mother
Val Dexter ... Himself - Treadwell's Father
Sam Egli ... Himself - Egli Air Haul
Franc G. Fallico ... Himself - Coroner
Willy Fulton ... Himself - Pilot
Marc Gaede ... Himself - Ecologist
Marnie Gaede ... Herself - Ecologist
Sven Haakanson Jr. ... Himself - Alutiiq Museum Director
Amie Huguenard ... Herself (archive footage)

David Letterman ... Himself (archive footage)

Jewel Palovak ... Herself
Kathleen Parker ... Herself - Close Friend

Warren Queeney ... Himself - Actor and Close Friend

Timothy Treadwell ... Himself (archive footage)
Larry Van Daele ... Himself - Bear Biologist

Directed by
Werner Herzog 
 
Writing credits
Werner Herzog (written by)

Produced by
Kevin L. Beggs .... executive producer (as Kevin Beggs)
Alana Berry .... associate producer
Billy Campbell .... executive producer
Phil Fairclough .... executive producer
Andrea Meditch .... executive producer
Erik Nelson .... executive producer
Erik Nelson .... producer
Tom Ortenberg .... executive producer
Jewel Palovak .... co-executive producer
 
Original Music by
Richard Thompson (music composed by)
 
Cinematography by
Peter Zeitlinger (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Joe Bini 
 
Production Management
Don Baer .... executive in charge of production: Discovery Channel Inc.
Randall M. Boyd .... post-production supervisor (as Randall Boyd)
Jessica DeJong .... production manager (as Jessica Dejong)
Dave Harding .... executive in charge of production
Tom Koykka .... production manager
Jane Root .... executive in charge of production: Discovery Channel Inc.
 
Sound Department
Ken King .... audio
Michael Klinger .... post-production audio
Spencer Palermo .... audio (as Spence Palermo)
D.D. Stenehjem .... post-production audio
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Erik Söllner .... assistant camera operator (as Erik Sollner)
Amie Huguenard .... camera operator: archive footage (uncredited)
Timothy Treadwell .... camera operator: archive footage (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Michael Anthony Brown .... editorial assistant
Herrianne Cayabyab .... on-line editor
Colin Hatton .... editorial assistant
Maya Hawke .... assistant editor
Adarsh Kaushal .... editorial assistant
Brian Patterson .... editorial assistant
David W. Ryan .... editorial assistant
Chris Camerote .... assistant editor (uncredited)
David Foulk .... editorial assistant (uncredited)
Spencer Hecox .... on-line editor (uncredited)
David Taylor .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Danielle DeGruttola .... musician: cello
John Hanes .... musician: percussion and drums
Stephen Hart .... music recording engineer
Henry Kaiser .... music producer
Jim O'Rourke .... musician: piano and guitar
Damon Smith .... musician: acoustic bass
Richard Thompson .... music arranger
Richard Thompson .... musician: guitar and bass
Rebecca Rienks .... music coordinator (uncredited)
 
Thanks
Carol Dexter .... acknowledgment: photos/footage provided by
Val Dexter .... acknowledgment: photos/footage provided by (as Val)
Sam Egli .... acknowledgment: photos/footage provided by
Willy Fulton .... acknowledgment: photos/footage provided by
Sue Houghton .... special thanks
Anna Rogers .... acknowledgment: photos/footage provided by
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
MPAA:
Rated R for language
Runtime:
USA:103 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
In the DVD's extra-feature section about the documentary's music-recording sessions with Richard Thompson and fellow musicians, Werner Herzog explains his vision for the material he asked the musicians to improvise. For instance, underneath the slow fight of two bears, cello and the upright bass are heard menacing. Also when Treadwell swims near a bear, Herzog explains that this is not the kind of harmony it appears to be, but instead it's a situation of dangerous foreshadowing.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Timothy Treadwell:I'm out in the prime cut of big green. Behind me is Ed and Rowdy, members of an up-and-coming sub-adult gang. They're challenging everything, including me. Goes with the territory. If I show weakness, if I retreat, I may be hurt, I may be killed. I must hold my own if I'm gonna stay within this land. For once there is weakness they will exploit it, they will take me out, they will decapitate me, they will chop me into bits and pieces. I'm dead. But so far, I persevere. Persevere.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Spoofed in Sheep Man (2006)See more »
Soundtrack:
CoyotesSee more »

FAQ

Do we hear the recording of the attack?
Is this film real? Is this a mockumentary?
David Letterman is credited on IMDb but I didn't see him in the film, where was he?
See more »
224 out of 261 people found the following review useful.
A life both tragic and silly, 24 August 2005
Author: Chris Knipp from Berkeley, California

For thirteen years "grizzly man" Timothy Treadwell went to an Alaskan wildlife refuge on Kodiak Island and pitched his tent alone -- and the last couple of times with a girlfriend (Amy Huguenard) -- spending the summers among huge grizzly bears. The rest of the year he went to schools and "free of charge" showed his films of the bears and his exploits. When the last of his summers drew to a close he and his girlfriend died among the grizzlies as he'd always known -- and even David Letterman had pointed out -- that he might. Filmmaker Werner Herzog, longtime student of crazy eccentric loners on heroic doomed quests, has taken on Treadwell's life and personality as the subject of a rare and powerful documentary.

At the heart of "Grizzly Man" are Herzog's selective cullings from film Treadwell left behind chronicling both the bears and his own demons. Herzog has added interviews with women in Treadwell's life, with his parents, with the pilot who took him to and from his campgrounds and later found his and his girlfriend's remains, and with Franc Fallico, the unusually sympathetic and sensitive -- and perhaps a bit looney -- coroner who examined these. The director has bound it all together with his own frank and idiosyncratic narration. The result is a rare sober look at the more delusional aspects of man's relations to wild animals.

At times Herzog by implication sympathetically links Treadwell with his former principle star and sparring partner, the late mad eccentric actor Klaus Kinski. Like Kinski Treadwell had tantrums on a film set. But his set was the outdoors and there was no director to spar with; his sparring partners were nature and his own troubled psyche. Nature contained, of course, living witnesses, chief among them the grizzly bears he knows can kill him. He repeatedly tells the camera how much he loves them. He loves the gentler, smaller foxes near whose dens he pitches his tents during the second halves of his summer sojourns. He tells the camera you must be firm with the bears, and he says he knows how to handle them, even though he also repeatedly says he knows he may die there. He is a gambler. Is he a complex man, or merely a confused one? Is he brave, or just foolhardy? What is his purpose in spending all this time among the grizzlies? Is he gathering information, or taking refuge among creatures he need not please, only keep a safe distance from (though he continually comes closer to bears than the park rules and good sense require)? He has a soft sissified manner and voice and even says he wishes he were gay. But he also rants and rages embarrassingly and tiresomely against unseen enemies, poachers, sightseers, rangers, hunters, park officials, the whole urban settled world he runs from to this world he idealizes and blindly sees as perfect. As Herzog notes, Treadwell sought to disregard nature's cruelty, and any time it was in his face -- as when the bears were starving in a dry spell and began eating their own young -- he sought to manipulate nature to eliminate the ugliness. He faults not the bears but the rain gods.

Young Timothy according to his parents was an ordinary boy who loved animals from childhood and got a diving scholarship to college. But he injured his back and quit college and he drank and when he went to LA to act and didn't get a part on Cheers he "spiraled down." He never had a lasting relationship with a woman and the drinking became serious and constant. In vain he tried programs, meetings, self-discipline -- but the drinking went on and was killing him. Finally he got sober for the grizzlies and the foxes. He decided to devote his life to them and he pledged to them that he would be clean and healthy. It was a miracle. Yet he remained not only manic-depressive but passive-aggressive, as his alternations between gentle declarations of love of the animals and his spewing of vitriol against the civilized world attest.

Treadwell's soft-voiced declarations of love and sweetness among the grizzlies would be beautiful -- if such behavior, in a world of extreme physical risk, surrounded by limber lumbering beasts with great teeth and long claws, while preening for the camera with caps and bandanas and golden locks in a dozen alternate takes -- were not criminally silly and irresponsible. Herzog hides none of this in his portrait, which is both sympathetic and ruthless.

As the years passed the Grizzly Man found transitions back to civilization harder and harder to make. On the last occasion, an airport official infuriated him by questioning the validity of his ticket and he turned around with his girlfriend -- who was afraid of bears! -- and returned to the "maze," the most dangerous of his summer campgrounds because it wasn't in the open where the bears could see him and steer clear but among their burrows and the brush. It was later than he ever stayed and the bears he knew and had names for were hibernating now, replaced by new unknown and more hostile and nasty animals. He must also have been more desperate, perhaps more careless? We see the bear that probably devoured him and the woman.

Herzog has access to everything, even an audio-only tape of Timothy and Amy's truly grizzly death. He spares us, though.

As Herzog begins his film by stating, Timothy Treadwell crossed a line between wild animal and human that should never be crossed. This is a line so many other touchy-feely "nature" and "wildlife" films cross. See "The March of the Penguins" and you'll have a prime example. "Grizzly Man" isn't meant to be about grizzlies. It's about men who cross that line -- who willfully misunderstand nature for their own misguided reasons, to serve their own dysfunctional needs.

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How exactly did he help the bears? ZombieLuvMachine
Could he have suffered Munchausen by proxy? Angus-8
Anyone else really hate him by the end? AndrewBlackie
Closet Homosexual aakash-karkare
The real tragedy in this movie ... uncltravlinmatt
anyone know of any crime scene pics? (GRAPHIC IMAGE) AgentSekhmet
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