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Sophie Scholl: The Final Days (2005) Poster

Trivia

This film's opening prologue states: "This film is based on historical facts, as yet unpublished transcripts, and new interviews with witnesses."
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The Stadelheim prison in Munich's Giesing district, where the execution of Sophie Scholl and many others (at least 1,035) took place during the Third Reich, is still in use as a prison as of 2014. Adolf Hitler had also been imprisoned here for a month in 1922.
As the end credits roll, pictures of the real Sophie Scholl, her brother Hans and Christoph Probst are shown.
In January 2014, the guillotine which was used to behead Sophie Scholl and other opponents of the regime, was rediscovered in the basement of the Bavaria National Museum in Munich. It had been locked away due to its gruesome nature and could be identified without a doubt. The last remaining member of the White Rose group, Franz Josef Müller, 89 years old at the time of the discovery, is against public exhibition of the guillotine, which he thinks to be entertainment.
The film takes place from February 17 to February 22, 1943.
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The film was shot in chronological order.
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Some scenes were filmed at the University of Munich, the original location where Sophie and Hans Scholl had been arrested. The square in front of the university's main building is called "Geschwister-Scholl-Platz".
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The execution scene was, ironically, shot in a morgue. "It was a shock, especially the smell," recalls Julia Jentsch. "I'd never smelled that before. I was very uncomfortable. But the team is there, and someone eats a sandwich... It's grotesque."
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In Tatort: Bitteres Brot (2004) Julia Jentsch plays the daughter of Lena Stolze's character, who played Sophie Scholl in Fünf letzte Tage (1982) and in The White Rose (1982).
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This film's final afterword states: "Thanks to Helmut von Moltke, the 6th leaflet of the White Rose was taken to England vis Scandinavia. In mid-1943, millions of copies were dropped by Allied planes over Germany. They now bore the title: 'A German Leaflet, Manifesto of the Students of Munich'."
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This film's closing epilogue states: "The so-called People's Court imposed the death sentence on . . . [seven] . . . members of the White Rose . . . Harsh sentences were imposed on . . . [twelve members] . . . Other members of the White Rose suffered draconian punishments."
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Jörg Hube (Robert Scholl) previously played an Oberregierungsrat in The White Rose (1982), another Sophie Scholl biopic.
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