Steve runs away from home, having argued with his father, and hides in a slate mine where his friend Paul finds him and brings him back. However, on returning to their village the two boys ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview:
Jayne Collins ...
Maureen Rogers
Andrew Ashby ...
Paul Jenkins
Toby Bridge ...
Steve Rogers
Dudley Sutton ...
Mike Ellis
John Forgeham ...
Sam Rogers
John Barcroft ...
Peter Jenkins
Ann Windsor ...
Hilda Jenkins
Mike Lewin ...
PC Edwards
Morris Perry ...
Professor Stonely
Frederick Treves ...
Supeintendent Parry
Hazel McBride ...
Jean
Roger Llewellyn ...
PC Morgan
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Storyline

Steve runs away from home, having argued with his father, and hides in a slate mine where his friend Paul finds him and brings him back. However, on returning to their village the two boys find the place completely deserted. Or so they think. Written by Simon Arnold

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1976 (UK)  »

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A ripping yarn, but what about the Welsh?
4 August 2015 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

The film focuses on two boys, one of whom has got into trouble with the police after he is accused of an act of vandalism which he did not commit, but in which he has taken too much interest. After his father tells him to await punishment, he runs away, and his friend tracks him down. Both boys' parents are employed at a certain type of power station which is in danger of meltdown - the obvious word beginning with 'n' is never used during the film. When the boys return home they find the whole area deserted, but still do not know why. The film focuses on the boys' struggle for survival once they realise what is happening.

This film was shot in the north west Wales region of Gwynnedd - mainly in Trawsfynydd and Porthmadog, with a few scenes in Blaenau Ffestiniog and the surrounding roads, and the facility in question is the now defunct Trawsfynydd power station. Even allowing for the fact that the nuclear power industry in the 1970s will have employed people from all over the UK, whose default language will have been English, the shortage of Welsh characters and the almost total lack of Welsh signs in one of the most Welsh parts of "Welsh Wales" is still somewhat jarring. The only exception on screen is a police station with a sign reading "Heddlu - Police", presumably because the building was also a police station in real life.

These concerns aside, the film is full of action throughout. Notably, the final scene is reminiscent of spy thrillers except that it was shot in Blaenau rather than Berlin. To know more it will be necessary to watch the film, and I recommend that course of action.


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