Familia (2005) - News Poster

(2005)

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Canada Picks ‘Gabrielle’ as Foreign-Language Oscar Entry

Canada Picks ‘Gabrielle’ as Foreign-Language Oscar Entry
Gabrielle,” Quebec director Louise Archambault’s drama about a developmentally disabled music prodigy who finds love with a fellow choir member, will represent Canada for consideration as a best foreign-language film Oscar nominee, it was announced Tuesday by Telefilm Canada, which chairs the pan-Canadian Oscar selection committee.

The film, which stars Gabrielle Marion-Rivard, won the audience award at the Locarno film festival this past summer, and also screened at the Toronto Film Festival earlier this month.

This marks the third time a film produced by Luc Dery and Kim McGraw of Micro_scope has been selected to represent Canada; the Montreal prodco’s previous titles Philipp Falardeau’s “Monsieur Lazhar” and Denis Villeneuve’s “Incendies” both went on to receive a nomination in the foreign-language category.

“Over the last several years, Canada’s film industry has done our country proud with three nomination for Best Foreign Language Film three years running,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Locarno Film Review: ‘Gabrielle’

Locarno Film Review: ‘Gabrielle’
Two developmentally disabled members of a Montreal choir want to exert independence and consummate their love in Louise Archambault’s predictably sweet “Gabrielle.” Fitting into the solid market for well-made, uplifting stories about individuals with special needs fighting the odds and coming into their own, the pic can also be seen as a manipulative heart-tugger directed at self-satisfied audiences who enjoy rooting for those less fortunate than themselves. “Gabrielle” makes nice use of the expressive qualities of group singing, and Archambault generally avoids the Afterschool Special feel associated with such themes. Locarno’s public prize and healthy international sales presage popular embrace.

No doubt producer Luc Dery is hoping for a trajectory of success similar to that of his “Monsieur Lazhar,” another Locarno entry that went on to be shortlisted for the 2011 foreign Oscar. Both French-Canadian productions are high on mass appeal and feel-good emotion, aiming for a mainstream constituency
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Possible Words: Sydney’s Canadian Film Festival

[/link]: Canadian Film Festival kicks off, and it promises to be quite a week of cinema. It was a surprise to me to learn that it is the first Canadian Film Festival in Sydney as there has been an abundance of annual minor festivals of national cinema popping up over the last ten years. The festival will be taking place at the city’s recently revitalised art house cinema, the Chauvel. What really separates the Canadian Film Festival from other national cinema festival are the events lined up to accompany the program. The opening night film, Familia, a drama that won ‘Best Canadian First Feature’ at the 2005 Toronto International Film Festival, is being screened with a Q & A with director Louise Archambault. Archambault is also doing a Q & A with the festival’s program ‘Shorts: Award Winners’ as her short Atomic Sake
See full article at ioncinema »

Genie people madly vote for 'C.R.A.Z.Y.'

TORONTO -- Quebec films continued their dominance of the Canadian movie industry Wednesday as Jean-Marc Vallee's C.R.A.Z.Y. picked up 12 nominations for the 2006 Genies, the nation's top film awards. C.R.A.Z.Y, a drama about a gay man coming of age in Catholic Quebec during the 1970s and Canada's Oscar contender in the best foreign-language category, brought Vallee nominations for best film, best direction and best original screenplay. Other Quebec contenders included Luc Picard's L'Audition, a drama about a bill collector who delves into his childhood to prepare for his first movie audition, and Louise Archambault's Familia. Both grabbed seven Genie nominations.

Genie people madly vote for 'C.R.A.Z.Y.'

Genie people madly vote for 'C.R.A.Z.Y.'
TORONTO -- Quebec films continued their dominance of the Canadian movie industry Wednesday as Jean-Marc Vallee's C.R.A.Z.Y. picked up 12 nominations for the 2006 Genies, the nation's top film awards. C.R.A.Z.Y, a drama about a gay man coming of age in Catholic Quebec during the 1970s and Canada's Oscar contender in the best foreign-language category, brought Vallee nominations for best film, best direction and best original screenplay. Other Quebec contenders included Luc Picard's L'Audition, a drama about a bill collector who delves into his childhood to prepare for his first movie audition, and Louise Archambault's Familia. Both grabbed seven Genie nominations.

Familia

Familia
Louise Archambault's Familia is a refreshing and insightful look at the relationships of two sets of three generations of women that contemplates the question of whether or not women are genetically bound to be like their mothers.

Steering well clear of soap opera, the film offers a slice of life that women will surely recognize and men would no doubt benefit from seeing. Only the lack of a clear point of view may keep it from having wide appeal.

Flighty aerobics instructor Michele (Sylvie Moreau), a single mother with a 14-year-old daughter, has a bad gambling habit that leaves her broke and homeless so she turns to her old friend Janine for help.

Janine (Macha Grenon) is an accomplished interior designer who has a beautiful home that she manages impeccably; overseeing her two children while her broadcaster husband is frequently away.

Michele's daughter Marguerite (Mylene St-Sauveur) is a free spirit like her mom while Janine's daughter Gabrielle (Juliette Gosselin) maintains a straight-laced demeanor to please her mom.

As Janine's brother is Marguerite's father and Michele's mother has a new boyfriend of her own, family gatherings are always an adventure but the kids calmly explain to their friends who's who.

Janine gives Michele a job and allows her old friend and her daughter to stay with her, but Michele's gambling habit gets worse and Janine's fussiness increases as she comes to believe that her husband is having an affair.

When the two daughters start to behave as adolescents will, Michele and Janine react in ways not dissimilar from how their own mothers respond when they turn to them for help.

The storyline is held together by a neat, if cruel, act of vengeance and there is much biting wit along the way. The acting is outstanding and the film suffers only from being book-ended by a speculative narration that leaves the drama unfulfilled.

Toronto film fest picks local fare

Toronto film fest picks local fare
TORONTO -- Rolling out the lineup of Canadian films for the 30th edition of the Toronto International Film Festival, organizers Tuesday announced world premieres for Thom Fitzgerald's 3 Needles and Beowulf & Grendel, the latest work from Sturla Gunnarsson. Also, short-filmmaker Louise Archambault's feature film debut, Familia, will open the second edition of Canada First, a showcase for emerging Canadian directors. 3 Needles stars Chloe Sevigny, Sandra Oh, Olympia Dukakis, Stockard Channing and Lucy Liu in a drama about AIDS that spans three continents. Beowulf & Grendel, a drama about a Norse hero's battle with a murderous monster loosely based on the ninth century Anglo-Saxon epic poem, is set for the festival's Special Presentations sidebar.

Toronto film fest picks local fare

Toronto film fest picks local fare
TORONTO -- Rolling out the lineup of Canadian films for the 30th edition of the Toronto International Film Festival, organizers Tuesday announced world premieres for Thom Fitzgerald's 3 Needles and Beowulf & Grendel, the latest work from Sturla Gunnarsson. Also, short-filmmaker Louise Archambault's feature film debut, Familia, will open the second edition of Canada First, a showcase for emerging Canadian directors. 3 Needles stars Chloe Sevigny, Sandra Oh, Olympia Dukakis, Stockard Channing and Lucy Liu in a drama about AIDS that spans three continents. Beowulf & Grendel, a drama about a Norse hero's battle with a murderous monster loosely based on the ninth century Anglo-Saxon epic poem, is set for the festival's Special Presentations sidebar.

Sarandon to receive honor at Locarno fest

Sarandon to receive honor at Locarno fest
ROME -- Two more titles were added Wednesday to this year's lineup of films in competition for the Locarno International Film Festival's Golden Leopard prize. They are Canadian director Louise Archambault's Familia and Yvan Le Moine's Vendredi ou un Autre Jour, a Belgium-France-Italy co-production. The new titles join 15 others announced last week. Festival organizers also said that Susan Sarandon will be on hand to receive an excellence award and that the opening film in the Piazza Grande will be Ketan Mehta's The Rising -- Ballad of Mangal Pandey. The festival runs Aug. 3-13.

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