7.3/10
548
10 user 31 critic

Touch the Sound: A Sound Journey with Evelyn Glennie (2004)

A documentary which explores the connections among sound, rhythm, time, and the body by following percussionist Evelyn Glennie, who is nearly deaf.

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ON DISC
5 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Credited cast:
Evelyn Glennie ...
Herself
Fred Frith ...
Himself
Roxane Butterfly ...
Performer (as Roxanne Butterfly)
Horacio 'Negro' Hernández ...
Performer (as Horazio 'El Negro' Hernandez)
Ondekoza ...
Performer (as Za Ondekoza)
This Misa Saikou ...
Performer
Jason the Fogmaster ...
Performer
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Roger Glennie
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Storyline

While still a student, Evelyn Glennie learned that she was going deaf. Rather than abandon her study of music, in which she had shown such talent, she instead turned her focus toward percussion instruments and developed her ability to feel the sound through her body. This documentary follows her as she performs in New York, Germany and Tokyo, sharing her insights into the nature of music and the ways in which we experience it. Written by Jean-Marc Rocher <rocher@fiberbit.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

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Language:

Release Date:

4 November 2004 (Germany)  »

Also Known As:

Aggixe ton iho  »

Filming Locations:


Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$8,435 (USA) (9 September 2005)

Gross:

$176,051 (USA) (26 May 2006)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Quotes

Fred Frith: In a way, improvisation - the narrative involved in improvisation - is your whole life up to that point.
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User Reviews

 
Contemplative and beautiful.
6 June 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Thomas Redelsheimer's beautifully crafted documentary is patient, precise, and exquisitely tuned into the subject matter. It's so refreshing to see a masterfully shot and thoughtfully edited documentary, especially after sitting through such overrated, uninspiring, and clumsily shot and edited mediocrities like Control Room and Born into Brothels. Redelsheimer is, like Errol Morris, one of the few documentary filmmakers today who seem to truly care about the art of non-fiction cinema. He also believes an audience can make intuitive leaps, guided by sound and images, that bring them so much closer to the soul of his subject. In this case, Evelyn Glennie, a deaf master percussionist, invites the director and his crew into her meditative world that allows her to literally "hear" with her body. Redelsheimer captures some unbelievably beautiful natural moments of picture and sound, and juxtaposes them with his own soulful artistic skill. A must-see for lovers of documentaries who appreciate the potential of the genre.


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