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Kirsten Dunst Talks Wedding Planning with Fiancé Jesse Plemons (She Has a Pinterest Board!)

12 September 2017 1:35 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Kirsten Dunst and Jesse Plemons are “having a really good time” planning their upcoming nuptials.

News of the Fargo costars’ engagement surfaced in January when Dunst, 35, was spotted with what appeared to be an engagement ring at the Golden Globe Awards. Although the actress told People in June that she’s “not in any rush” to plan their wedding, they’re now brainstorming ideas — and using a very popular website to do so!

“I never thought I was that person who’d have a Pinterest board. I like doing all of that pinning things,” Dunst told Kelly Ripa and Ryan Seacrest »

- Natalie Stone

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‘Game of Thrones’: 8 Films to Watch If You’re Already Missing the Fantastical Series

28 August 2017 10:20 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Winter is indeed upon us, as “Game of Thrones” has just wrapped its truncated seventh season with a jaw-dropping finale that moves plenty of pieces (most of them terrifying, ice-cold, and dragon-aided) into place for a game-changer of a final season…that won’t come until sometime in 2018. It’s the Long Night, all over again (and, if those gently falling snowflakes during some of the finale’s last moments are any indication, fans of the HBO series aren’t the only ones headed for a chilling, unforgiving few months).

In order to keep diehard viewers sated until its last episodes hit the small screen, here are some ideas for films that might help ease the pain, from classic Westerns to underseen historical dramas, all with that special “Thrones” touch (murderous, political, bloody, and at least partially beholden to mythical beasts).

Read More:‘Game of Thrones’ Review: Finale ‘The Dragon »

- Kate Erbland

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Guest Post: Why the Lack of Women-Made Films in the National Film Registry Is a Problem — and How…

25 August 2017 7:01 AM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Guest Post: Why the Lack of Women-Made Films in the National Film Registry Is a Problem — and How We Can Fix ItDirector Gina Prince-Bythewood and star Sanaa Lathan on the set of “Love and Basketball”: New Line Cinema. “Love and Basketball” is one of Wifv’s nominations for the National Film Registry.

Guest Post by Maya Pearson

New strides towards equality are being made every year for women in Hollywood. This summer “Wonder Woman” shattered box office records and glass ceilings alike, in no small part thanks to director Patty Jenkins. And one can hope that films like “Atomic Blonde” will inspire more female-led action films in the coming years. While it is important that we celebrate the groundbreaking achievements of women filmmakers today, we also have a responsibility to pay tribute to the trailblazing women who have helped us get where we are.

One way to aid this effort is by nominating films to the Library of Congress’ National Film Registry (Nfr). Every year the Nfr accepts 25 films that are at least 10 years old and considered to be “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” to preserve. While the registry is conscious of the importance of female filmmakers, women-made films are still highly underrepresented in the registry. Out of 700 films archived as of 2016, only 40 — or roughly 5.7 percent — are directed by women. While severely lacking in representation for female filmmakers, the National Film Registry has found room for controversial films helmed by men over the years. For example, the notoriously racist “Birth of a Nation” (1915) was inducted in 1992.

For decades women have worked to effect change from both behind and in front of the camera. The importance of ensuring that their filmmaking contributions are not lost cannot be understated. The Nfr includes what are considered to be some of the most significant American films ever made. By ensuring that women-made films are among these ranks, we demonstrate that we value these works, stories, and experiences to the same degree as those created by men.

Women in Film and Video of Washington, D.C. (Wifv) selects several films written and directed by women to endorse for the National Film Registry every year. These are our suggestions:

He’S Only Missing (1978), written and directed by Robin Smith, is a highly personal documentary which follows the families of American soldiers attempting to track down their loved ones during and after the Vietnam War.Sleepless In Seattle (1993) is one of the most well-known films of writer-director Nora Ephron’s career. She directed the film and co-wrote the screenplay with David S. Ward and Jeff Arch.Eve’S Bayou (1997) centers on an African-American family in the 1960s. The film, written and directed by Kasi Lemmons, intertwines fraying relationships with elements of magical realism.Boys Don’T Cry (1999), written and directed by Kimberly Peirce, depicts the true story of Brandon Teena, who fell victim to an anti-transgender hate crime.Bring It On (2000), written by Jessica Bendinger, is a cult classic that highlights female friendships and rivalries in high school cheerleading.Love & Basketball (2000), writer-director Gina Prince-Bythewood’s revered feature debut, presents a unique hybridization of the sports and romance genres.Stranger With A Camera (2000) is a haunting documentary from Elizabeth Barret which, by looking into the murder of filmmaker Hugh O’Conner, examines moral questions about documentary filmmaking itself.Jesus Camp (2006) was directed by Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady, and provides an unprecedented, objective look at evangelical Christianity in America through the eyes of children.Marie Antoinette (2006) was written and directed by Sofia Coppola and provides an atypical, female-driven take on the collapse of the monarchy leading up to the French Revolution.Juno (2007) was written by Diablo Cody and provides an unusual look at pregnancy from the perspective of its witty teenage protagonist.

You can learn more about each of these films and how to nominate them here. You can nominate up to 50 films before the September 15, 2017 deadline.

We can’t change the amount of female representation in the past, but by nominating films for the Nfr, we can help ensure that the contributions of female filmmakers are preserved for the future.

Maya Pearson is an intern at Women in Film and Video of Washington, D.C. She is studying Radio/Television/Film at Northwestern University.

Guest Post: Why the Lack of Women-Made Films in the National Film Registry Is a Problem — and How… was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Women and Hollywood

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‘A Ghost Story’ and ‘The Big Sick’ Sustain Indie Box Office Surge

9 July 2017 10:23 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

A Ghost Story” (A24) joined the recent surge of strong limited openers. Boasting top reviews, David Lowery’s offbeat Sundance hit nabbed a wider than usual arthouse audience. A24 is terrific with the right project at casting a wider specialized market net, so this should join several recent titles led by “The Big Sick” (Amazon Studios/Lionsgate) and “The Beguiled” (Focus Features) that have found wider interest as they expand.

This weekend, as breakout “The Big Sick” reaches a wider audience, it’s on its way to becoming the biggest specialized release of 2017 so far — and Amazon’s biggest grosser to date. It looks perfectly positioned for its nationwide break this Friday.

Syria documentary, likely Oscar-contender “City of Ghosts” (IFC) opened in New York only, landing high-end reviews for a reality-based theatrical release.

Opening

A Ghost Story (A24) – Metacritic: 87; Festivals include: Sundance, Seattle, Bam 2017

$108,067 in 4 theaters; PTA (per theater average »

- Tom Brueggemann

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Why Sofia Coppola Should Not Make a Studio Movie

7 July 2017 12:27 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Girl Talk is a weekly look at women in film — past, present, and future.

Armed with an Oscar and a distinctive filmmaking sensibility, Sofia Coppola may seem like the sort of filmmaker primed to make the jump to big studio movies. Who wouldn’t want more money and a bigger stage to spend it on? Well, Coppola doesn’t — and she’s right to stay away.

A recent article in Variety questioned if Coppola “may be trapping herself in a boutique bubble of her own,” asking if “perhaps her next move should be to work on a larger scale, to mix it up in some way, to shake herself out of her comfort zone.” Yet the filmmaker has roundly rejected such demands to somehow inflate her portfolio in the name of “growth,” balking at blockbusters and sequels, and resisting the notion that her projects should primarily exist to make a lot of money. »

- Kate Erbland

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Who are the contemporary Masters of Cinema?

3 July 2017 6:15 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Anghus Houvouras on the contemporary Masters of Cinema…

Sometimes a good movie conversation can lead you to interesting places. Take the discussion around the wildly overpraised Baby Driver; a good movie that’s being called a ‘masterpiece’ (it’s not). During the discussion my friend Simon Columb posted this on Twitter:

Edgar Wright ain't no "master". Bloomin' eck pic.twitter.com/4HJzn2sS8X

— Simon Columb (@screeninsight) July 2, 2017

I love Edgar Wright. I’ve watched the entire catalog of his work many, many times. Hell, I’ve watched the two series of Spaced At Least a dozen times. The man has an amazing sense of style and kinetic storytelling that feels uniquely his own. But even with a gun to my head I would not list him among the modern contemporary masters of cinema (even one that shoots cars). But, thanks to that hyperbolic burst of circle-jerk fandom, a thought came to mind? »

- Anghus Houvouras

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The Beguiled movie review: horror of manners

30 June 2017 2:36 PM, PDT | www.flickfilosopher.com | See recent FlickFilosopher news »

MaryAnn’s quick take… If Jane Austen wrote a horror movie. An almost serene sinisterness infuses female-gazey carnal intrigue… but it could be even more feminist than it is. I’m “biast” (pro): I’m desperate for stories about women; love the cast

I’m “biast” (con): nothing

(what is this about? see my critic’s minifesto)

So who is — or are — the beguiled of The Beguiled? Is it the badly wounded Union soldier taken in by the girls and women of a Virginia seminary school in 1864 while the Civil War rages nearby? Does he feel the need to enchant his captor-nurses so thoroughly that they wouldn’t dream of turning him over to the Confederate army as a prisoner of war? (He does indeed attempt this.) Or is it those few students and teachers remaining at the otherwise abandoned school, so secluded, so bereft of charming male companionship? »

- MaryAnn Johanson

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It’s a Coppola World: Inside the Filmmaking Co-Op That is Sofia, Eleanor, Roman, and Francis

24 June 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Sofia Coppola is the promotional circuit with “The Beguiled” (June 23, Focus Features). So is her 81-year-old mother, Eleanor, who wrote and directed her first narrative feature, the romantic road movie “Paris Can Wait;” Sony Pictures Classics is releasing it around the country to strong reviews and box office. Mother and daughter will meet, with their films, at this week’s Munich International Film Festival, where they’ll be joined by the man who began the family film dynasty, Francis Ford Coppola.

Sofia and her older brother, director and screenwriter Roman Coppola, also own San Francisco production company American Zoetrope, which their father launched in 1979; Roman runs it day to day. “They seek each other’s help when it’s needed,” said long-time family producer and casting guru Fred Roos.

Roos has been Francis Ford’s producer and casting director since “The Godfather.” And from the beginning of Sofia’s career, »

- Anne Thompson

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It’s a Coppola World: Inside the Filmmaking Co-Op That is Sofia, Eleanor, Roman, and Francis

24 June 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Sofia Coppola is the promotional circuit with “The Beguiled” (June 23, Focus Features). So is her 81-year-old mother, Eleanor, who wrote and directed her first narrative feature, the romantic road movie “Paris Can Wait;” Sony Pictures Classics is releasing it around the country to strong reviews and box office. Mother and daughter will meet, with their films, at this week’s Munich International Film Festival, where they’ll be joined by the man who began the family film dynasty, Francis Ford Coppola.

Sofia and her older brother, director and screenwriter Roman Coppola, also own San Francisco production company American Zoetrope, which their father launched in 1979; Roman runs it day to day. “They seek each other’s help when it’s needed,” said long-time family producer and casting guru Fred Roos.

Roos has been Francis Ford’s producer and casting director since “The Godfather.” And from the beginning of Sofia’s career, »

- Anne Thompson

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Sofia Coppola: The Specific Touch of Femininity

23 June 2017 8:15 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The Virgin SuicidesIn 2015, three significant films were released: Deniz Gamze Ergüven’s Mustang, Mélanie Laurent’s Breathe and Céline Sciamma Girlhood. All three are female stories devoid of the faux candor associated with many male-directed ‘women’s stories.’ There is an astonishing amount of authenticity in these wildly different films, each playing with explorations of the teenage girl psyche with wildly differing results. In Mustang, we met girls whose spirits could never be broken, no matter the odds or imprisonments they faced, from societal to literal, when they’re confined in their home. In Girlhood, we learned these imprisonments could be as psychological and socially constructed as the physical bars placed on their windows in Ergüven’s feature. And in Laurent’s psycho-drama, we face the realities and interplay of teenage cruelty and intimacy found in female friendships in that developmental stage. These films aren’t playing to strictly a female audience, but they feel refreshingly tailor-made to do so. They’re offering up honest and raw depictions of girlhood and femininity on the creative landscape and it was often beautiful, sometimes tragic and all together worth celebrating. It’s something that filmmaker Sofia Coppola has been doing her entire career, and her latest release, the remake of The Beguiled, drives home this point further.Over the course of her career Coppola has developed a distinctive approach to her filmmaking. Her distinct style utilizes—and nearly favors—visuals as a means of storytelling (I’d argue she could tell the same stories in silence with her visual finesse). Along the way she’s also developed an unabashed feminine perspective that, combined with her eye for stylish filmmaking, has set her apart from her male contemporaries. She isn’t just telling stories about women but imbuing them with a sense of femininity.It starts with color, building a point of view from a vibrant palette and the way in which the cinematography capture each female character. A common complaint in current cinema—particularly in blockbusters and tentpole films—has been the gray color grading. Movies that should pop ultimately end up blending in with their background. Coppola defies this expectation, relishing in the pinks of the hats Marie Antoinette or in Scarlett Johansson’s wig in Lost in Translation. She finds color in the yellows of the kitchen in Somewhere—the sunlight radiating through the shades covering a window—or in the baby blues of the sky whizzing past Antoinette. We see the blues that swallow Elle Fanning whole in Somewhere as she hosts a tea party beneath the surface of a pool. She utilizes stark whites in Antoinette's lavish, daisy-infested fields and the sun-bleached morning-after in The Virgin Suicides. Her color palette is distinctive and gives her films a fantastical atmosphere, adding to their unabashed femininity. Her colors aren’t loud and vibrant or muted and hollow, serving as much of a purpose as her storytelling.Her films’ image subvert the male gaze by never allowing the female characters to be exploited as they view her cinematic universe instead through a female friendly lens. We watch the sisters of The Virgin Suicides from afar, sure, and Johansson is sometimes looked at through the eyes of Bill Murray, but more often than not we’re given looks into the worlds of female characters born into male-dominated spaces. Their inclusion is worthy of curiosity, judgement, disdain or damaging admiration. As Roger Ebert once said in a review for Marie Antoinette:“This is Sofia Coppola’s third film centering on the loneliness of being female and surrounded by a world that knows how to use you but not how to value and understand you. [...] Every criticism I have read of this film would alter its fragile magic and reduce its romantic and tragic poignancy to the level of an instructional film. ”When we meet most of Coppola’s delicate, youthful characters in moments of severe isolation—be it on a lonesome carriage ride through a foggy morning, alone in an expansive hotel room meant for two, or in a household where rules are inflicted to keep its inhabitants sheltered and painfully lonely. From The Virgin Suicides to this year's The Beguiled, Coppola has depicted isolation as one of her major themes, approached particularly through the specific point of view.The femininity comes from Coppola’s understanding of these women beyond their psychological or physical cages. So often in films about women, the female characters exist without any sense of female identity; they’re simply judged on their actions, their features or what a wider audience can relate to. Movies about weddings, having children and being mothers and girlfriends play on tropes of what it means “to be a woman” without exploring what it means to be a woman. Coppola, typically working from a place of interested in adolescents mature beyond their years, shows rather than tells us aspects of being a woman through all historical settings and walks of life. Throughout much of cinema’s mainstream history we’ve been told just exactly what it means “to be a man,” definitions that may have changed throughout the decades but have still been firmly covered in a layer of masculine attitude. We have films that dedicate their stories from a male character's birth to their death, detailing the ins and outs of what makes that particular guy tic. For women that sort of nuance through different time periods is much more difficult to come across, and it’s why voices such as Coppola’s are so poignant; they reach and grab hold of those looking for stories they can relate to, that mirror who they are or were in certain periods of their lives. (Until this point, she has had little to no diversity in her films and is mainly showcasing white femininity. Hopefully this is something she’ll change in the future.)All of this makes her directing The Beguiled remake so fascinating. Originally filmed by Don Siegel, adapted from Thomas P. Cullinan’s novel, and starring Clint Eastwood as Corporal John ‘McBee’ McBurney, this is a man’s story: after being wounded during the Civil War, McBurney is taken in by a Southern all-girls boarding school. The female characters are more sinister and less sympathetic. In Coppola’s version there are similar tropes of the mighty headmistress and the school’s young seductress, but yet again, we’re given these depictions through the female point of view; these women have increased agency as we see the story unfold from their worldview. As is the case with The Virgin Suicides, the girls of the boarding house are kept inside and isolated for their own safety, making them curious about and isolated from the outside world. Like with Marie Antoinette, it’s women living amidst the mess men have made, thrown into a society that has displaced them. Coppola’s themes are undoubtedly recurring, flexible and timeless enough to be able to encompass all walks of life that women can identify with, spread wide across history.Coppola’s films are full to the brim with unabashed and gleeful femininity. It’s shown in the way Fanning's role of the daughter in Somewhere is polished and poised, showcasing the wisdom girls possess from a young age as she helps her father (Stephen Dorff) out of his jaded shell. It’s in the naiveté of the sisters of The Virgin Suicides, but also in their world weariness in the face of boyish neighbors who take interest in the reclusive girls. Coppola dismantles the idea of depicting mysterious and shielded women as enigmas rather than humans. We see it in casual shots of modern Converse shoes scattered amongst decadent heels in Marie Antoinette, or in its titular character enjoying the pleasures of sex at her own pace. It is in Johansson’s unyielding gaze and youthful yearning in Lost in Translation and hell, even Emma Watson’s self-absorption in The Bling Ring. To be a female character in Coppola’s film is more than presenting a gender or a trope but instead the director makes the “radical” decision to depict women in all of their grace, kindness, misery and determination in ways that feel very honest. »

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How ‘The Beguiled’ Star Kirsten Dunst Took Control of Her Career by Owning Her Taste for Depressives, Smart Directors, and Powerful TV

22 June 2017 3:03 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Kirsten Dunst, who steals the show from Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell in Cannes director-winner Sofia Coppola’s Civil War potboiler “The Beguiled” (June 23, Focus Features). It’s her fourth collaboration with Coppola.

Bottom Line: Dunst steered toward playing strong women from an early age, with films that include political comedy “Dick” with Michelle Williams, John Stockwell’s “Crazy/Beautiful” with Jay Hernandez, and Peyton Reed and Jessica Bendinger’s cheerleader sleeper “Bring It On,” shot the year she graduated from Los Angeles’ Catholic high school Notre Dame. She has never settled for The Girlfriend or romantic lead, although she made a memorable Mary Jane Watson in the “Spider-Man” franchise. “Looking back, I’m proud of the choices that I’ve made,” she said. “A »

- Anne Thompson

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How ‘The Beguiled’ Star Kirsten Dunst Took Control of Her Career by Owning Her Taste for Depressives, Smart Directors, and Powerful TV

22 June 2017 3:03 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Kirsten Dunst, who steals the show from Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell in Cannes director-winner Sofia Coppola’s Civil War potboiler “The Beguiled” (June 23, Focus Features). It’s her fourth collaboration with Coppola.

Bottom Line: Dunst steered toward playing strong women from an early age, with films that include political comedy “Dick” with Michelle Williams, John Stockwell’s “Crazy/Beautiful” with Jay Hernandez, and Peyton Reed and Jessica Bendinger’s cheerleader sleeper “Bring It On,” shot the year she graduated from Los Angeles’ Catholic high school Notre Dame. She has never settled for The Girlfriend or romantic lead, although she made a memorable Mary Jane Watson in the “Spider-Man” franchise. “Looking back, I’m proud of the choices that I’ve made,” she said. “A long career is up to you. It’s your barometer of taste and the choices you make as an actress inform how other people look at you and if they want you in their movies. So you have to be wise.”

Career Peaks: A model from the age of three, the child actress shot out of a cannon when she won a worldwide search for 11-year-old Claudia, starring opposite Tom Cruise and Brad Pitt in “Interview with the Vampire,” Neil Jordan’s fabulously kinky 1994 take on the Anne Rice classic. Dunst has long leaned into women’s subjects and directors, from Gillian Armstrong and Robin Swicord’s “Little Women” and Leslye Hedland’s raucous “Bachelorette,” to Coppola’s Cannes breakout “The Virgin Suicides,” shot when she was 16.

That film marked her segue to more adult roles. “I was sexualized,” Dunst told me, “but through her lens, which was such a wonderful way to be transitioned. There was nothing grotesque, even though I was doing things in that film that I was uncomfortable doing. I’d stress out about ‘Oh, I have to make out with that boy on the roof,’ but Sofia would just have me nuzzle into the side of their face. Even though I was blossoming, it was not something I was comfortable with yet. She really opened that door for me.”

Dunst went on to star for Coppola as a coquettish queen in the title role “Marie Antoinette,” and cameoed in “The Bling Ring.”

Assets: Beyond sexual allure, Dunst brings depth and mystery. She can play the girl next door (“Spider-Man”), a drunk bride peeing on the lawn in the moonlight in her wedding dress (“Melancholia”), an imperious 18th-century queen (“Marie Antoinette”), or a racist Nasa administrator (“Hidden Figures”). She has a steely edge, as well as a wicked sense of humor. Her career pivot came before 2010 Ryan Gosling two-hander “All Good Things,” when she started to meet with acting coach/therapist Greta Seacat (who also works with Coppola).

While Dunst always picks projects based on directors, she credits Seacat with a total game change “in terms of acting and how I approach things,” said Dunst. “And now it’s all about me. It’s cathartic for me. It’s my thing, it’s my experience, it’s nothing about pleasing anyone else but myself. And it all comes from me, so I have so much more control than anybody else; it’s all about my own inner life. By the time I get to set, I’m so prepared no one needs to direct me. No one needs to tell me anything. I feel so powerful with what I have to bring, that making movies is for myself now and it’s like getting rid of poisons. Like if you went to a therapist all the time, but I get to do it by acting out anything I want to, so that’s a powerful tool.”

She draws the line at too much nudity, and turned down a sexy role in another Lars von Trier movie. “I would work with him again,” she said. “It just depends on the part because he loves exposing… like Charlotte Gainsbourg, she has a less curvaceous body, so it’s less assaulting to see than if someone with larger breasts and more womanly-shaped did some of the things she did in movies.”

Biggest Problem: As she has come into a strong sense of her own identity, Dunst is making career choices for herself, not her fans. She’s not looking to please anyone else or playing the movie-star game, as evidenced by her maverick choices, from “Melancholia” to “Fargo.” “Only Lars and Pedro Almodovar write these incredible, messy roles for women,” she has said.

Awards Attention: She won Best Actress at Cannes for her hilariously depressed bride in Lars von Trier’s comedic end-of-the-world tragedy, “Melancholia,” after being quick enough on her feet to survive a disastrous Cannes press conference when her director went off the rails. While she earned plaudits and a Golden Globe nomination for Season Two of “Fargo” as the deeply flawed murderess Peggy Blumquist, she’s never earned an Oscar nomination. “The Beguiled” could be her first — she’s earning raves across the board.

Next page: Dunst scribes her character in “The Beguiled”: “Edwina would be me at my worst, working on a film that I don’t want to be on.”

Related storiesHow Controversies Can Hurt Movies Before They're Released -- IndieWire's Movie Podcast (Screen Talk Episode 154)'The Beguiled' Exclusive: Here's What It's Like to Work On A Sofia Coppola Set -- WatchSofia Coppola Explains Why She Left Her Ambitious Take on 'The Little Mermaid' »

- Anne Thompson

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Kirsten Dunst Says She’s ‘Very Happy’ with Jesse Plemons — but ‘Not in Any Rush’ to Plan Their Wedding

22 June 2017 11:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Kirsten Dunst and Jesse Plemons may have already played husband and wife on television, but in real life the engaged couple are taking it slow when it comes to taking on those roles.

Though The Beguiled actress is “very happy” with her former Fargo costar-turned-fiancé, she tells People she’s “not in any rush” to plan their wedding.

“I’m very relaxed when it comes to those kinds of things,” Dunst says, adding, “I’m going to get married at some point!”

News of the engagement surfaced in January when Dunst, 35, was spotted with what appeared to be an engagement »

- Kara Warner and Brianne Tracy

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Review: The Beguiled, Sofia Coppola's Gorgeous and Campy Romp

22 June 2017 9:00 AM, PDT | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Sofia Coppola is a filmmaker whose work I've appreciated from a distance. I know she's a great director, but apart from Marie Antoinette, her stories of rich white people and their troubles has held little interest for me. But as a fan of the gothic, horror, and period film, The Beguiled certainly would seem to fit in my wheelhouse of film love. And while not without some problems of gender representation, the film is a gorgeous and campy romp, disguising itself as a period piece with just the right touch of horror. Three years into the Us Civil War in the Virginia countryside, Martha Farnsworth (Nicole Kidman) maintains what little normalcy she can at her school, with her five young charges and teacher Edwina Dabney (Kirsten...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

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The Beguiled’s Sofia Coppola Talks ‘Sisterly’ Bond with Kirsten Dunst and Flipping the Script on the Classic

22 June 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Sofia Coppola’s latest film, The Beguiled, wowed audiences at this year’s Cannes Film Festival and Coppola took home the festival’s coveted Best Director honors in addition to a shower of positive reviews.

Sitting down with People at the festival in May, Coppola opened up about her award-winning project, especially her relationship with lead actress Kirsten Dunst, 35, with whom she shares a storied history.

“I’ve known Kirsten since she was 16,” said Coppola, “It was fun to see play a part that was so different for her. She plays a very quiet, repressed woman. It’s so the opposite of her personality. »

- Liam Berry

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'The Beguiled': How Sofia Coppola Reimagined a Macho Seventies War Film

22 June 2017 5:38 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Up until a few years ago, Sofia Coppola swore she would never do a remake. Then her production designer, Anne Ross, brought Don Siegel's 1971 pulp classic The Beguiled to her attention – and the director saw a film ripe for retelling. A group of Southern belles are holed up at an all-girls school during the Civil War; suddenly, the young women and their headmistress have their isolated existence disrupted by a wounded Union soldier. Nearly half a century ago, Clint Eastwood's Corporal John McBurney behaved as if he had arrived at a brothel, »

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More Cannes Winners: Diane Kruger to Become the New Isabelle Huppert + Best Director Coppola Oscar Chances?

20 June 2017 8:05 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'In the Fade' with Diane Kruger: Fatih Akin's German-language Avenging Woman drama may give its star the chance to become next awards season Isabelle Huppert. Diane Kruger: 2017–2018 awards season's Isabelle Huppert? The 2003 Cannes Film Festival's Female Revelation Chopard Trophy winner, Diane Kruger was Cannes' 2017 Best Actress winner for Fatih Akin's In the Fade / Aus dem Nichts. If Akin's German drama finds a U.S. distributor before the end of the year, Kruger could theoretically become the Isabelle Huppert of the 2017–2018 awards season – that is, in case the former does become a U.S. critics favorite while we stretch things a bit regarding the Kruger-Huppert commonalities. Just a bit, as both are European-born Best Actress Cannes winners who have been around for a while (in Huppert's case, for quite a while). Perhaps most importantly, like Huppert in Paul Verhoeven's Elle, Kruger plays a woman out for revenge in In the Fade. Diane Kruger-Isabelle Huppert 'differences' There is, however, one key difference between the two characters: in Elle, Huppert wants to avenge her own rape; in In the Fade, Kruger wants to avenge the death of her Turkish husband (Numan Acar) and their son (Rafael Santana) at the hands of white supremacist terrorists. Another key difference, this time about the Kruger-Huppert Cannes Film Festival connection: although Isabelle Huppert became a U.S. critics favorite – and later a Best Actress Oscar nominee – for her performance in Elle, her (unanimous) Best Actress Cannes win was for another movie, Michael Haneke's The Piano Teacher / La pianiste back in 2001. At that time, Huppert also became a U.S. critics favorite (winning Best Actress honors in San Diego and San Francisco; a runner-up in Los Angeles and New York), but, perhaps because of the psychological drama's sexually charged nature, she failed to receive a matching Oscar nod. Last year's Cannes Best Actress, by the way, was Jaclyn Jose for Brillante Mendoza's Philippine drama Ma' Rosa. Huppert had been in contention as well, as Elle was in the running for the Palme d'Or. Diane Kruger Best Actress Oscar nomination chances? A Best Actress nomination for Diane Kruger at the German Academy Awards (a.k.a. Lolas) – for her first German-language starring role – is all but guaranteed. Curiously, that would be her first. As for a Best Actress Oscar nod, that's less certain. For starters, unlike the mostly well-reviewed Elle, In the Fade has sharply divided critics. The Hollywood Reporter, for one, summarized Akin's film as a “thriller made riveting by an emotional performance from Diane Kruger,” while The Guardian's Peter Bradshaw called it a “mediocre revenge drama” with “a not particularly good” star turn. Besides, since the year 2000 just one “individual” Best Actress Cannes winner has gone on to receive an Oscar nomination for the same performance: Rooney Mara*, who, though one of the two leads in Todd Haynes' Carol (2011), was shortlisted in the Oscars' Best Supporting Actress category so as not to compete with her co-star and eventual Best Actress nominee Cate Blanchett. Then there's the special case of Penélope Cruz; the 2006 Best Actress Oscar nominee – for Pedro Almodóvar's Volver – was a Cannes winner as part of that family comedy-drama ensemble†. And finally, despite their Cannes Best Actress win for performances in (at least partly) English-language films, no less than seven other actresses have failed to be shortlisted for the Academy Awards this century. Björk, Dancer in the Dark (2000). Maggie Cheung, Clean (2004). Hanna Laslo, Free Zone (2005). Charlotte Gainsbourg, Antichrist (2009). Juliette Binoche, Certified Copy (2010). Kirsten Dunst, Melancholia (2011). Julianne Moore, Maps to the Stars (2014). Coincidentally, that same year Moore starred in Still Alice, which eventually earned her the Best Actress Oscar. Warner Bros. will be distributing In the Fade in Germany later this year. Regarding the Oscars, whether late in 2017 or late in 2018, seems like it would be helpful if Diane Kruger got a hold of Isabelle Huppert's – and/or Marion Cotillard's and Jean Dujardin's – U.S.-based awards season publicists. * Rooney Mara shared the 2011 Cannes Film Festival Best Actress Award with Emmanuelle Bercot for My King / Mon roi. † Also in the Cannes-winning Volver ensemble: Carmen Maura, Lola Dueñas, Blanca Portillo, Chus Lampreave, and Yohana Cobo. 'The Beguiled' trailer: Colin Farrell cast in the old Clint Eastwood role in Sofia Coppola's readaptation of Civil War-set, lust & circumstance drama. Sofia Coppola ends Cannes female drought About 13 years ago, Sofia Coppola became the first American woman to be shortlisted for the Best Director Academy Award – for the Tokyo-set drama Lost in Translation, starring Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson. Coppola eventually lost in that category to Peter Jackson for the blockbuster The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, but she did take home that year's Best Original Screenplay Oscar statuette. There haven't been any other Oscar nominations since, but her father-daughter drama Somewhere, toplining Stephen Dorff and Elle Fanning, was the controversial Golden Lion winner at the 2010 Venice Film Festival. This year, Coppola has become only the second woman to win the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award – for The Beguiled, an American Civil War-set drama based on Thomas P. Cullinan's 1966 novel of the same name (originally published as A Painted Devil). With shades of Rumer Godden's Black Narcissus, The Beguiled follows a wounded Union soldier as he finds refuge at a girls' boarding school in Virginia. Sexual tension and assorted forms of pathological behavior ensue. Tenuous Cannes-Oscar Best Director connection From 2000 to 2016, 20 filmmakers† have taken home the Cannes Film Festival's Best Director Award. Of these, only four have gone on to receive matching Best Director Oscar nominations – but no wins: David Lynch, Mulholland Dr. (2001). Alejandro González Iñárritu, Babel (2006). Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007). Bennett Miller, Foxcatcher (2014). Four other Cannes Best Director winners were bypassed by the Academy even though their movies featured – at least a sizable chunk of – English-language dialogue: Joel Coen, The Man Who Wasn't There§ (2001). Paul Thomas Anderson, Punch-Drunk Love (2002). Gus Van Sant, Elephant (2004). Nicolas Winding Refn, Drive (2011). In other words, a Best Director Cannes Film Festival win is no guarantee of a Best Director Academy Award nomination. Ultimately, Sofia Coppola's chances of an Oscar nod in the Best Director category depend on how well The Beguiled is received among Los Angeles and New York film circles, and how commercially successful – for an “arthouse movie” – it turns out to be. † During that period, there were three Cannes Film Festival Best Director ties: 2001: Joel Coen for The Man Who Wasn't There§ & David Lynch for Mulholland Dr. 2002: Im Kwon-taek for Painted Fire & Paul Thomas Anderson for Punch-Drunk Love. 2016: Cristian Mungiu for Graduation & Olivier Assayas for Personal Shopper. Both films opened in the U.S. in spring 2017 and may thus be eligible for the upcoming awards season. § Ethan Coen co-directed The Man Who Wasn't There, but didn't receive credit in that capacity. 'The Beguiled' with Nicole Kidman. The Best Actress Oscar winner ('The Hours,' 2002) had two movies in the Cannes Film Festival's Official Competition; the other one was 'The Killing of the Secret Deer,' also with Colin Farrell. Moreover, Kidman was the recipient of Cannes' special 70th Anniversary Prize. 'Sly' & 'elegant' Also adapted by Sofia Coppola, The Beguiled will be distributed in the U.S. by Oscar veteran Focus Features (Brokeback Mountain, The Danish Girl). The film has generally received positive notices – e.g., “sly” and “elegant” in the words of Time magazine's Stephanie Zacharek – and could well become a strong awards season contender in various categories. The cast includes The Killing of a Sacred Deer actors Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell, in addition to Kirsten Dunst (the star of Coppola's Marie Antoinette), Somewhere actress Elle Fanning, Oona Laurence, Addison Riecke, Angourie Rice, and Emma Howard. As an aside, Cullinan's novel also served as the basis for Don Siegel's The Beguiled (1971), a Southern Gothic effort adapted by Irene Kamp and former Hollywood Ten member Albert Maltz. In the cast of what turned out to be a major box office flop: Clint Eastwood, Geraldine Page, Elizabeth Hartman, and Jo Ann Harris. Women directors at Cannes & the Oscars For the record, Soviet filmmaker Yuliya Solntseva was the Cannes Film Festival's first Best Director winner, for The Story of the Flaming Years back in 1961. The only woman to have directed a Palme d'Or winner is Jane Campion, for The Piano (1993). Early in 1994, Campion became the second woman to be shortlisted for an Academy Award in the Best Director category. The first one was Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties (1976). 'A Gentle Night' & 'Montparnasse Bienvenue' Qiu Yang's short film Palme d'Or winner A Gentle Night should be automatically eligible for the 2018 Academy Awards. But competition, as usual, will be fierce. In the last decade, the only short film Palme d'Or winner to have received an Oscar nomination is Juanjo Giménez Peña's Timecode (2016), in the Best Live Action Short Film category. This article was originally published at Alt Film Guide (http://www.altfg.com/). »

- Steph Mont.

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'The Beguiled' Review: Sofia Coppola's Southern Gothic Is Pure Estrogenic Bliss

20 June 2017 5:13 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

When a shirtless Clint Eastwood starred in The Beguiled in 1971 – he played a wounded Yankee soldier who finds refuge from the Civil War on the grounds of a Southern girls school – he was the boss rooster in a henhouse.

That was then. Now writer-director Sofia Coppola has reshaped that film, based on the 1966 novel by Thomas Cullinan, into a Southern Gothic that simmers with violent undercurrents and dark, subversive wit. Laughs? You bet, though a few of them will stick in your throat.

Coppola, who last month won the directing prize at Cannes, »

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Sofia Coppola Movies Ranked Worst to Best

19 June 2017 10:57 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Sofia Coppola movies are defined by desolate landscapes, lonely characters, a wry sense of humor, and painterly compositions. For fans of this aesthetic, it’s pretty hard to get it wrong, and Coppola’s nearly 20-year track record attests to the consistency of her talent. From her feature-length debut “The Virgin Suicides” through her latest endeavor, “The Beguiled,” Coppola’s dreamlike visuals and deadpan tone have remained a distinctive voice in American cinema, one filled with gentle, forlorn faces and a world that always seems as though it’s on on the verge of devouring them whole. (If there isn’t already a Reddit forum theorizing that all Coppola movies exist in a single universe governed by the laws of sadness, someone should kick it up.)

While Coppola’s career was set in motion to some degree by the influence of a very famous father, her filmmaking capabilities are hardly dictated by Francis’ accomplishments. »

- Eric Kohn

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Sofia Coppola delivers a top notch remake in “The Beguiled”

19 June 2017 3:31 AM, PDT | Hollywoodnews.com | See recent Hollywoodnews.com news »

Remakes are often dismissed out of hand. Most of the time, they’re unnecessary at best and unwatchable at worst. Every so often, however, a worthwhile one comes down the pike and is worth celebrating. This week, we have one to take notice of and actually fete in Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled. After a successful debut at the Cannes Film Festival, it heads stateside to try and further its chances at sticking around until the precursor season begins. In a somewhat light year for Oscar friendly titles (really, this is the only one, besides The Hero), The Beguiled has at least a fighting chance. The film is, as mentioned above, a remake of the 1971 Don Siegel movie of the same name, which essentially was a Clint Eastwood star vehicle. Set during the Civil War in Virginia, much of the action takes place at a secluded all girls school, one »

- Joey Magidson

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