6.9/10
64
7 user 13 critic

Casting About (2005)

Not Rated | | Documentary | 11 May 2007 (USA)
Trailer
2:40 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $2.00 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
A lyrical documentary about the experience of casting actresses for a dramatic film.

Director:

1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
...
Herself
...
Herself
Jeannette Arndt ...
Herself
Solveig August ...
Herself
Nina Bagusat ...
Herself
Kristina Bangert ...
Herself
Silvana Bayer ...
Herself
...
Herself
Amalie Bizer ...
Herself
...
Herself
...
Herself
Hannah Bourne ...
Herself
...
Herself
...
Herself
Julia Bremermann ...
Herself
Edit

Storyline

A lyrical documentary about the experience of casting actresses for a dramatic film.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

Not Rated
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

| |

Release Date:

11 May 2007 (USA)  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$893 (USA) (11 May 2007)

Gross:

$6,922 (USA) (10 August 2007)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
audition nerve
11 May 2007 | by (Sydney, Australia) – See all my reviews

I had a negative reaction to this film and submit an opinion that may be unpopular, but I think still valid based on the fact that I have auditioned a lot of actors in my time.

I think Mr Hershey errs in ways that for me make the film a painful experience. He misrepresents what it is to film an actors audition in any standard industry fashion, by using inappropriate and counter-productive camera-work.

Most film and TV is shot in long and medium shots. Close-ups are used, but extreme close-ups rarely. Why then does Mr Hershey shoot these actors in extreme close-up? By doing so it robs the actor the opportunity to present themselves in a practical way, and refocuses the attention to the camera and the director. This technique also obliterates any pretense of an objective documentary. One would think that the very nature of observing an audition would allow for an easy objectivity. If ever a film-maker needed to use simple photography, it is here. You just want to be able to see the actor act. One is reminded of what Fred Astaire demanded - that his movement only be filmed in long shot. But Mr Hershey fails us.

This technique is particularly shoddy when the actors are asked to move. I've seen certain actors perform with their backs to the camera, effectively, but you have to be darned good to do it. And have a darned good director. But to show someone acting in extreme close-up in an audition becomes a laughable device. One can imagine the footage being reviewed and the question raised - Who's ear was that, again?! I also reacted against a montage of hand gestures, robbed of their context, unnecessary shots of cleavage and teeth and hair, and footage of actors preparing to act. The latter is particularly disturbing because it is something that directors are not privy to and should not be privy to, because it is ultimately irrelevant to the result. Yet expressions of anxiety, bravado, examination of the text, and the natural dislike of the monologue form to audition with are presented as if to score points off individuals.

I would like to think that Mr Hershey's motives were noble, and that he did not intend to deliberately mistreat the actors that had agreed to show their work to him. He could have been accused of being naive, if not for the fact that this is not his first credited directing job. But intended or not, he does these women a disservice, in my opinion. To be fair, I point out that the person I saw this film with did not have the same reaction as me, though that person is someone who has never held auditions.


4 of 7 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Recent Posts
gross OnewayOut
Discuss Casting About (2005) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page