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Domino (2005) Poster

(2005)

Trivia

Domino Harvey died from an accidental overdose of fentanyl on 27 June 2005, months before the release of the film, which was subsequently dedicated to her. Tony Scott and Mickey Rourke were among the people who attended her funeral.
The first words heard in the film, "Heads, you live. Tails, you die.", are spoken by the real life Domino Harvey.
Jacqueline Bisset, who plays Domino's mother (renamed Sophie Wynn in the film), actually knew Domino Harvey's real life mother Paulene Stone. They knew each other from their time as models and had worked together.
Thanks to Gusmano Cesaretti, Michael Mann's regular collaborator, Tony Scott managed to get on screen real-life gang bangers from 18th Street Gang in East Los Angeles.
Mickey Rourke initially turned down the role of Ed as he felt the script was weak and wanted to take part in Guy Ritchie's Revolver (2005), which was shooting at the same time. However, he gave in when director Tony Scott re-wrote the part with Rourke specifically in mind.
Édgar Ramírez wanted to meet Gerard Quiocho, the real life 'Choco', but according to Ramírez, Tony Scott had mistakenly been told that Quiocho was dead. Scott later found out through Domino Harvey that Quiocho was alive.
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During filming of the scene where Domino is firing two machine guns, one of the blank shells, which were hot, hit Keira Knightley on the neck, and stuck, giving her second-degree burns.
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The scene where Domino, Ed, and Choco are standing outside Claremont's office with their guns is a reference to a photo of Domino Harvey and Ed Martinez outside Celes King III's office, that was in the newspaper article where Tony Scott first heard about Domino. The photo was also printed on the cover page of all drafts of the film's shooting script.
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For Domino's Reality TV Show in the movie, the producers created a promo poster of the three hunters with Domino on the far right. Domino's mother said they'd only go for it if Domino was in the center. The final movie poster is the same as the reality poster, with Domino in the center.
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Tony Scott claimed that the frenetic filming and editing style of the picture is reflective of the high usage of cocaine amongst real bounty hunters he consulted while researching the film.
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Mickey Rourke's character, Ed Moseby, is based on real-life bounty hunter Ed Martinez, while Delroy Lindo's character, Claremont Williams III, is based on real-life bail-bondsman Celes King III, Domino Harvey's real boss. Both men were used as technical advisors on the film.
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The rights to Domino Harvey's life story was secured at the price of $500K.
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The word "fuck" and all of its derivatives are said 123 times in the movie.
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Tony Scott first thought of Keira Knightley for the role of Domino after seeing her in Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003).
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The character of Alf was inspired by the real life driver of Domino Harvey, Ed Martinez and Choco. According to Harvey, he was a man from Afghanistan whom they referred to as 'The Afghani' as they could not pronounce his name.
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Ron Jeremy appeared in one scene as a bail jumping drug dealer who was chased by Domino and Ed, but was cut from the film.
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Ed, Choco, and Domino use Vietnam War era flak jackets. These were notorious among combat troops for providing very little if any, actual protection from small arms fire.
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Richard Kelly's script included notes on the intended title sequence. It would have involved the camera following a trail of falling dominos along several southern California roads. As the dominos fall, they would spell out the credits. The last domino would fall and land at the base of the Stratosphere. In a script review for Aint It Cool News, the title sequence was singled out as one of the creative highlights. Ultimately budget concerns forced a more conventional title sequence to be created.
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Tony Scott met Domino ten years previously to make a movie of her life but only nailed the script when Richard Kelly came on board in 2002, creating the whole DMV plot to tie everything together.
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Multiple key off-screen lines of dialog are actually voiced by picture editor Tony Ciccone. Ciccone recorded the lines while editing in post production. Director Tony Scott was impressed enough with the performances of the one-time actor to keep them in the final film.
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Tony Scott first heard about Domino Harvey when his business manager Neville Shulman sent him an article about her from the British newspaper 'The Mail on Sunday'.
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The inspiration for Domino's goldfish Sammy came from actress Dakota Fanning, who told Tony Scott during the making of Man on Fire (2004) about her goldfish who had died.
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At one point in the 1990s, Sharon Stone was attached to play Domino.
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During the lengthy development period, Tony Scott commissioned several script drafts from Pulp Fiction (1994) coauthor Roger Avary. When Richard Kelly was brought on board, he discarded all prior drafts and started from scratch. None of Avary's material made it to the final film.
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According to Tony Scott on the commentary, he utilized Michael Mann's clout to cast the gang members seen early in the film as well as advice in using digital cameras.
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Richard Kelly was asked to write the screenplay after Tony Scott read the script for Southland Tales (2006).
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Charles Paraventi originally auditioned for the role of Raul Chavez. Tony Scott did not think he was right for the part and instead cast him as Howie Stein.
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Tony Scott came up with the idea to set the climax of the film at the Stratosphere tower after shooting Beat the Devil (2002) in Las Vegas.
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Amanda Foreman played a college counselor but was cut from the film. Her scene is among the deleted scenes included on the DVD.
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During production the film was given the good-natured nickname, "Man on Blowtorch" by picture editor Tony Ciccone in homage to the progression of a visual style Tony Scott incorporated on his prior film).
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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