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The Kite Runner (2007)

PG-13 | | Drama | 11 January 2008 (USA)
After spending years in California, Amir returns to his homeland in Afghanistan to help his old friend Hassan, whose son is in trouble.

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Writers:

(screenplay), (novel)
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4,606 ( 633)

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Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 6 wins & 22 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Sayed Jafar Masihullah Gharibzada ...
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Mir Mahmood Shah Hashimi ...
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Nabi Tanha ...
Ali
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Bahram Ehsas ...
Wali
Tamim Nawabi ...
Kamal
Mohamad Nabi Attai ...
Uncle Saifo the Kite Seller
Mohamad Nadir Sarwari ...
Spice Merchant
...
Party Worker
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Storyline

In the 70's in Afghanistan, the Pushtun boy Amir and the Hazara boy Hassan, who is his loyal friend and son of their Hazara servant Ali, are raised together in Amir's father house, playing and kiting on the streets of a peaceful Kabul. Amir feels that his wise and good father Baba blames him for the death of his mother in the delivery, and also that his father loves and prefers Hassan to him. In return, Amir feels a great respect for his father's best friend Rahim Khan, who supports his intention to become a writer. After Amir winning a competition of kiting, Hassan runs to bring a kite to Amir, but he is beaten and raped by the brutal Assef in an empty street to protect Amir's kite; the coward Amir witness the assault but does not help the loyal Hassam. On the day after his birthday party, Amir hides his new watch in Hassam's bed to frame the boy as a thief and force his father to fire Ali, releasing his conscience from recalling his cowardice and betrayal. In 1979, the Russians ... Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

There is a way to be good again.

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for strong thematic material including the rape of a child, violence and brief strong language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Language:

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Release Date:

11 January 2008 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Cometas en el cielo  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$20,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$471,713 (USA) (14 December 2007)

Gross:

$15,797,907 (USA) (11 April 2008)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

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Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Assef's character is white with blond hair in the book, but is brown with black hair in the movie. See more »

Goofs

During a 1988 scene in San Francisco, modern-day gas pumps are clearly visible. See more »

Quotes

Baba: [regarding the mullahs, who teach that drinking alcohol is a sin] I piss on the beards of all those self-righteous monkeys.
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Connections

References Bullitt (1968) See more »

Soundtracks

Paloma Blanca
Written by Johannes Bouwens
Performed by George Baker Selection
Courtesy of EMI Music Netherlands BV
Under license from EMI Film & Television Music
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User Reviews

I hope Afghanistan shares a similar fate.
17 December 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

After seeing the prosthetic legs dropping from the sky by parachute in Kandahar (2001), one of the most memorable images in all of cinema, I wondered why there weren't more stories coming out of such a tumultuous country, tied to Americans forever by 9/11. And now I think I know why.

Such a beautifully-wrought adaptation of the wildly-popular novel of the same name, The Kite Runner is a model of fine film-making in almost all respects except one: It's too pat. So maybe Charlie Wilson's War will show me that films about Afghanistan will not revolve around formulae and clichés.

The redemption of the protagonist, Amir (Khalid Abdalla), has been told forever in literature and film, just not in Afghanistan. So no matter how tear-jerking the film may be, it is still a story told many times of a man who commits an egregious sin as a child but redeems himself in the end with an act of courage. Meanwhile, director Marc Forster and screenwriter David Beniof lace the film with the major motif, kite running, to such an ingenious extent that it not only ties in the hero's youth with his maturity, it also provides a figurative way of showing the desolation and hope of the country mixed of course with contradictory elements such as cutting string and blessed artificial legs.

Thus the film as metaphor is a success in showing the dismal past of a struggling country and its hopeful future. The cinematic images also emphasize this duality: The vistas with snow capped mountains and endless plains deflect the vision of a barren land where trees that manage to grow have been cut down by invaders, in this case 1979 Russia. The titular activity flourishes in large part because the arid, stony land offers few other possibilities. When the land is revisited in 2000, the limited country seems almost completely bereft of color and resources, a gray prison that parades adulterers to be stoned in the soccer stadium and little boys abused by an out-of-control Taliban.

But true to the formula, Amir has a second chance. I hope Afghanistan shares a similar fate.


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